deepstash

Beta

We're not going back to normal

The Shut-In Economy

Essential goods and services will be adapted to suit this new reality of a ‘Shut-in’ Economy: Gyms selling home equipment or virtual coaching; schools providing e-learning to kids.

There will be unprecedented and previously impossible changes in our lifestyles in the long run, as we avoid crowds and queues 24/7.

55 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

We're not going back to normal

We're not going back to normal

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/615370/coronavirus-pandemic-social-distancing-18-months/

technologyreview.com

6

Key Ideas

Everything Has Changed

The world is slowing realizing that to stop this deadly virus, we will have to radically change how we do... Everything. Almost every activity in our lives, be it working, exercising, socializing, shopping, managing kids and family members is suddenly and radically changed.

While social distancing is proven to work, at least to ‘flatten the curve’, we don’t know how long this will last, as even if one person is infected, the virus can replicate quickly among the population. Deferred, periodic social restrictions can also be considered.

Fighting The Pandemic

A vaccine is at least eighteen months away, provided it works, and there is a hunt for quicker solutions.

Even having large capacity hospitals to treat more people at the same time is not working if social distancing measures are not activated among the population. Also, if the measures are lifted after five months, the pandemic will most likely return.

A Different Way Of Life

Sporting events, cinemas, art galleries, concerts and any other commercial activity that involves a large gathering will take a beating in the long run. There are other issues at stake: Airline activity, public transportation, and private schools.

There is also widespread unemployment, along with a huge rise in domestic violence.

The Shut-In Economy

Essential goods and services will be adapted to suit this new reality of a ‘Shut-in’ Economy: Gyms selling home equipment or virtual coaching; schools providing e-learning to kids.

There will be unprecedented and previously impossible changes in our lifestyles in the long run, as we avoid crowds and queues 24/7.

More Surveillance

Sophisticated software will be more widely used to track people using cellphone location data, using intelligence services for facilitating contact-tracing, as is being done in Isreal and Singapore currently. The people will have to adapt to these invasive measures, just like they adapted to stringent airport security checks after 9/11.

The Poor And The Weak

The workforce, especially the poor and weak will bear the true cost of the lockdown and pandemic. Even the gig workers, from Uber drivers to freelance service people will find it difficult to survive if they don’t change their work, or pivot it accordingly.

We all will have to adapt to new ways of living, working and even forging relationships as the world moves deep into uncharted waters.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The State Of The Virus

Life around the world is changing dramatically as we practise social distancing, staying away from our friends and avoiding going to our favourite places, or even being unable to work. We already l...

Uncertain Time Frame

Top experts say the virus is going to be circulating for a year or two and can keep infecting people, causing outbreaks until there is a vaccine or treatment to stop it. If we drop the unpleasant and strict measures, the virus outbreak can know no boundaries or limits of infections. It won’t simply go away in two weeks.

Guidelines by WHO
  • Wash your hands regularly, and for at least 20 seconds.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then dispose of it properly.
  • Clean and disinfect doors, handles and objects that are touched all the time.
  • Contact a health professional if you have symptoms; fever and a dry cough are most common.
  • DON’T touch your face.
  • DON’T go out of your home.

3 more ideas

Keeping social distance

If people have to go outside, they should keep at least a 2m (6.5ft) distance from others.

People with flu-like symptoms such as a dry cough and high temperature should self-isolate at home ...

Social distancing is necessary

The new virus spreads when an infected person coughs small droplets into the air. These can be breathed in, or you can become infected when you touch a surface they have landed on, and then touch your face with unwashed hands.

  • Social distancing involves working from home if possible.
  • Avoid unnecessary travel.
  • Stay away from crowded places.
  • Avoid gatherings with friends and family.
What is allowed when social distancing
  • See family and friends if it's essential.
  • Walk your dog for some exercise is important.
  • If you have no symptoms, provide essential care for elderly relatives and neighbors.
  • Go to the shop for food and groceries.
  • Exercise at a safe distance from others.

3 more ideas

A new playbook

Growth evangelists are right when they state that severe lockdowns produce a parallel human misery of unemployment, looming bankruptcies, and extreme financial anguish. Yet, opening the economy too...

The false choice

“Save the economy or save lives” is a false choice.
A group of economists published a paper on the 1918 flu outbreak. Their findings revealed:

  • Early and aggressive interventions saved lives and triggered a faster rebound, such as job growth and banking assets.
  • Without a healthy population, there can be no healthy economy.

The hope is for a deep, short recession, to show that people have shut the economy down to limit the spread of disease.

A living wage

Asking millions of able-bodied workers to stop working creates a crisis of unemployment.

During this time, the U.S. is expanding unemployment benefits and are also delaying tax filing. In northern-European countries, the government is directly paying businesses to maintain their payrolls to avoid mass layoffs and furloughs.

2 more ideas