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Carbon emissions are falling sharply due to lockdown. But not for long.

Long-term Outlook

On the whole, there is an unprecedented global disruption, causing a sharp drop in carbon emissions, which will affect the economy in untold ways and the effect may last a few years.

It depends on the world leaders if they restart the old ‘oil’ based energy sources, or get into the new clean energy options (like Electric Vehicles) once the pandemic is dealt with.

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Carbon emissions are falling sharply due to lockdown. But not for long.

Carbon emissions are falling sharply due to lockdown. But not for long.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/04/coronavirus-causing-carbon-emissions-to-fall-but-not-for-long/

nationalgeographic.com

3

Key Ideas

Earth On Pause

One impact of the ongoing pandemic has been the decrease in fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. This is due to factories that emit gases being shut across the world.

Experts say this is just temporary and would need to continue to have any real effect on climate change. If clean energy is not accelerated and supported by the government, the emissions will rebound.

Less Consumption Of Oil

Due to the lockdown, transit-related emissions have also decreased as people stay at home and non-essential items are no longer in demand. This has also reduced power and natural gas demands across the globe.

Example: Passenger vehicle traffic in the U.S. is down by 38 percent.

Long-term Outlook

On the whole, there is an unprecedented global disruption, causing a sharp drop in carbon emissions, which will affect the economy in untold ways and the effect may last a few years.

It depends on the world leaders if they restart the old ‘oil’ based energy sources, or get into the new clean energy options (like Electric Vehicles) once the pandemic is dealt with.

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