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What will our memories of lockdown be?

The new virus and its consequences to be remembered

The new virus and its consequences to be remembered

Humans worldwide are trying to handle, as much as possible, the current pandemic.

When all is gone, we are going to look back and mostly remember how important we found technology to be: it enabled us to communicate and keep updated with all that was happening around us.

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What will our memories of lockdown be?

What will our memories of lockdown be?

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/apr/19/what-will-our-memories-of-lockdown-be

theguardian.com

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Key Ideas

The new virus and its consequences to be remembered

Humans worldwide are trying to handle, as much as possible, the current pandemic.

When all is gone, we are going to look back and mostly remember how important we found technology to be: it enabled us to communicate and keep updated with all that was happening around us.

Future memories of the pandemic

The current period will undoubtedly leave us with more than just one memory. However, not all of them will be as important as the fact that we have all lost our sense of differentiating the days of the week, as nothing is happening anymore, or the fact of having a close person infected or even dead because of the virus. So we would better wish no memories at all instead of any bad memories to begin with.

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Historians would be compiling stuff and in the next few dec...

Oral History

Most of history is derived from government documents, transcripts, newspaper articles, and recently, from digital data. Oral history, a tradition from the old, pre-written cultures are often crucial in providing a holistic, rich, and complete picture of a historical event.

Oral histories (and even personal journals) sometimes answer questions that aren’t found in the official texts, about the inner motivations and discarded facts that may be important.

Bias In History

30 years from now, oral history collected through TV interviews and online resources will be incredibly valuable, but can also carry certain biases. Historians have to ensure that the interpretations are accurate and untainted.

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Ineffective methods

Travel bans are proving to be too late. Since the virus can incubate for 14 days, carriers can spread it before they even know they have it.
Protective gear such as masks only works if they are used correctly.
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Preventing “community spread”

In 1918, health officials from Philadelphia ignored calls for social distancing and allowed a World War I victory parade to proceed. Within three days, people were sick. Within six weeks, 12,000 were dead.

The 1918 influenza had a fatality rate of about 2,5 percent, compared to the 3,4 percent of the new virus. The best way to prevent the virus from spreading is to keep people apart.

Check-in with people

Check-in with people

If you think about the current situation too much, you might start freaking out from the pressure.
What makes this situation survivable is checking in with each other. Doing so can ease the s...

Assume good intentions

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  • Pause, breathe and consider how the other is feeling. By doing this, you can alleviate any blowups.

Think, then act

In a stressful situation, when people often fall back on instinct, deliberate action is indispensable.
So think of your life in terms of a series of "think/do think/do, think/do". It’s the absence of the "think" in the "think/do" sequence that gets people in trouble.

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