Writing Internal Memos - Deepstash

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Writing Tips for Remote Workers (And Everyone Else)

Writing Internal Memos

Company-wide emails are an opportunity to use your storytelling skills and keep things interesting and engaging to the wide audience.

  • Use active voice and sentence variations and stay with the company’s wider goals/mission.
  • Make sure there are no redundant paragraphs in your memo. If a paragraph is not conveying a good idea, remove it or incorporate it somewhere else. Place your paragraphs in chronological order, keeping your story linear.
  • Make sure the ending is satisfying and the discussion does not keep going.

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