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Same As It Ever Was · Collaborative Fund

Voltaire

“History never repeats itself, but man always does.”

Voltaire

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Same As It Ever Was · Collaborative Fund

Same As It Ever Was · Collaborative Fund

https://www.collaborativefund.com/blog/same-as-it-ever-was/

collaborativefund.com

9

Key Ideas

The Lessons Of History

History is a treasure-house of learning, and as many books teaching us lessons from history point out, what was true in the medieval ages is often true even now, though the circumstances, technology and society have gone through a sea of changes.

The things that are worth knowing are those which hold steady and true then and now.

Voltaire

Voltaire

“History never repeats itself, but man always does.”

1920 and 2020

1920 is a hundred years apart from 2020, yet how people think is largely unchanged. Human behaviour is still hinged on greed, fear, opportunity, scarcity, and basic instincts.

We have no idea what will happen in the future, but we do have a good idea about how human beings might behave in certain situations.

Big Risks Vs Small Risks

Small risks can sometimes combine, compound and mutate into something big. Yet the attention is always on the big stuff, and the small stuff happening around is largely ignored by all.

Example: A huge nuclear bomb that destroys entire countries is unlikely to be used preemptively, but small, precise weapons with limited range are much more likely to be used in war and in turn, can result in the big ones to be used too, eventually.

Having A Positive Outlook

Optimism helps us dumb down and decrease the pain and difficulties that the future likely holds, and provides us with hope with regards to our options.

Even now, with the state of income mobility, and the disparity in wealth, few should have reason to be optimistic, but many are, and it doesn’t feel bad to have a positive outlook no matter what the circumstances.

Pain Is Short-Term

Pain is a short-term loss, but may have some long-term gain.

Exercising can be painful or tedious for some and has great benefits if done regularly. Telling the truth can be painful, but is often the right thing to do.

Avoidance Of Pain

History shows us that people avoid pain and exertion, would lie to avoid a painful situation and would create hacks or shortcuts to skip through pain, often leading to worse problems at a later stage.

Example: A simple toothache would make people eat a painkiller tablet, which leads to many serious complications of body organs like the liver.

Life-altering Experience

A person’s behaviour, once formed, largely remains unchanged. However, a major, life-changing event, that causes hardcore stress, can undo behavioural patterns.

It’s the basis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and it makes people change or alter their behaviour, creating new, lifelong habits, scarred by the major event.

The No. 1 Constant: Disagreement

When we are ‘hit’ by something huge, and unpredictable, we tend to explain it with great force and start forecasting with greater conviction, as if we know a lot about life. Someone who hasn’t experienced the earth-shattering event will not be on the same page.

Apart from selfishness, self-centeredness and stupidly, a majority of people do not agree with each other due to them having different experiences.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Seven universal plots
Seven universal plots

There are only seven plots that are so fundamental to the way we tell stories that every storyteller uses one of them: Overcoming Monsters, Rags to Riches, The Quest, Voyage and Return Rebirth,...

Economic history

Looking for a few universal plot patterns reveals things fundamental to how all people think, which are likely to be repeated in the future and relevant to your own situation. This idea also applies to how the economy works.

Economic history can seem complicated because it's part of politics, psychology, sociology, criminology, biology, military, technology, education, finance, etc. But within all that complexity is a lot of similarities.

The lens to look through
  • People seem to want the same economic things – security, power, admiration, fulfillment.
  • They tend to use the same tactics to acquire those things - work, risk, incentives, persuasion, theft, control.
  • They tend to fall for the same flaws pursuing those things - overconfidence, pessimism, underestimating how fast things can change, etc.

Although economic history may seem complicated, there are only a small number of broad story plots throughout the world and throughout time.

8 more ideas

Knowledge And Wisdom

  • Knowledge is the factual information, the awareness, and understanding of a subject. It is basically information about something that comes from learning facts.
The Time Factor

More time means that a person can attain more knowledge, but as knowledge is a passive acquisition of facts and data, having more knowledge does not mean having wisdom.

Wisdom tends to be less affected by time, as it requires additional steps of applying judgement, drawing conclusions and adapting one’s behaviour accordingly.

Application of Knowledge and Wisdom
  • Wisdom is related to knowledge, just as practice is related to theory. Wisdom is intrinsic whereas knowledge comes from external sources.
  • Application of wisdom requires more than facts and data, like speculations, feelings, moral and ethical values. Applying knowledge is a much simpler and more linear process.

Example: Development of nuclear weapons requires knowledge, but during wartime, using nuclear weapons on a country requires wisdom.

Brainshift: how our perceptions alter

Under particular circumstances (involving high anxiety or a major reward) our brains cause us to perceive the world around us in ways that contradict and distort objective reality. It's when we'...

Why we stick to bad decisions

Psychologists call this “the anchoring bias.”

After we’ve made a decision, even an illogical one, we tend to cling to it. That is, we filter out dissenting information while seeking data that confirms our original viewpoints.

How to avoid brainshift
  • Be aware that we are all vulnerable to the consequences of brainshift, regardless of our ethics, social status, or IQ.
  • Know the situations that stoke your fears and desires: Those involving money, sex, and fame/recognition are good places to start.
  • Answer to these questions: What’s the worst thing that could happen? How would I feel if that outcome occurred?