deepstash

Beta

Why Pokémon remains a cultural phenomenon 20 years on

The Pokémon Phenomenon

The Pokémon Phenomenon

The franchise of Pokémon, which ranges from movies, video games and even card games, which are after more than 20 years, is as strong as ever. It has kept evolving with new and fresh ideas (like the 'Go' version) and has incorporated new technology (like embracing smartphones) to keep the fans interested.

It is one of the few ‘brands’ to have its own magazine, which is now going strong after 28 issues.

2 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why Pokémon remains a cultural phenomenon 20 years on

Why Pokémon remains a cultural phenomenon 20 years on

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/gaming/pokemon-why-still-popular-championships-a8924756.html

independent.co.uk

3

Key Ideas

The Pokémon Phenomenon

The franchise of Pokémon, which ranges from movies, video games and even card games, which are after more than 20 years, is as strong as ever. It has kept evolving with new and fresh ideas (like the 'Go' version) and has incorporated new technology (like embracing smartphones) to keep the fans interested.

It is one of the few ‘brands’ to have its own magazine, which is now going strong after 28 issues.

Pokemon Championships

Pokémon is one of the few games to have tournaments and championships at an international scale, like the 2019 Europe Championships which happened in Berlin.

Youngsters get hooked to the world of e-sports like a gateway drug that is Pokémon.

Pokémon: The Appeal

Pokémon is an easy game to get into but is intriguing and difficult to master, whether it is consoles or trading cards. There are a lot of characters (or creatures) to know about and it is a pleasant world to get lost into.

The 2016 ‘Detective Pikachu’ movie, coming after 17 years after the original Pokémon movie, made it clear that it is still popular and has a captive audience.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Disease of More

Used in sports to explain why teams who win championships are often ultimately dethroned, not by other, better teams, but by forces from within the organization itself. The players want more: more ...

Our imagined "better"

Regardless of our external circumstances, we live in a constant state of mild-but-not-fully-satisfying happiness. Things are pretty much always fine. But they could also always be better. And that's why most of us live most of our lives constantly chasing our imagined "better".

The hedonic treadmill

It's the constant chasing of pleasure. 

People who are constantly striving for a “better life” end up expending a ton of effort only to end up in the same place.

one more idea

Incomplete information and over-estimation
Incomplete information and over-estimation
  • Much of what you need to know in life is hidden from you. You need to make decisions, but is still the victim of chance or uncertainty.
  • We tend to over-est...
Thinking probabilistically to avoid overestimating our abilities

To avoid the trap of overestimating our own skill, we need to start thinking probabilistically. That means estimating the odds and adapting your decision-making accordingly.

Even if the decision had a good outcome, we still need to objectively analyse the quality of the decision-making underneath.

Learn to deal with tilting

Tilting means realizing that your emotions are not separate from the logic of your decision making - for example, the despair that comes from bad luck, or the overconfidence that comes from a win.

You can learn to cope better by regularly checking in with yourself to see what you are feeling and how you react. Once you have identified those feelings, then try to analyse how they're influencing your judgment.

one more idea

Gambler’s Fallacy
Gambler’s Fallacy

The odds are always fifty-fifty. But most of us anticipate better odds, or better luck, after a bad streak, as if now we are due for good luck.

This ‘Gambler’s Fallacy’...

The Biggest Bluff

Maria Konnikova, in her soon to be published book The Biggest Bluff, tells us that Poker is a real game, closer to life as opposed to the modern games which try to ‘game’ our brains’ and exploit its weaknesses.

Poker pushes us out of our comfort zones and illusions and puts us where life is, unpredictable, and always with fifty-fifty odds.