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4 Simple Rules on How to Make a Decision

Make all important & difficult decisions on paper

It relieves pressure from the situation and allows your mind to focus on the task at hand, rather than spiraling into self-doubt and second-guessing.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Simple Rules on How to Make a Decision

4 Simple Rules on How to Make a Decision

https://www.tonyrobbins.com/leadership-impact/the-four-rules-for-decision-making/

tonyrobbins.com

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Key Ideas

Make all important & difficult decisions on paper

It relieves pressure from the situation and allows your mind to focus on the task at hand, rather than spiraling into self-doubt and second-guessing.

When making decisions, get clear about your reasons

You’ve got to get absolutely crystal clear about your outcome and your purpose. If you forget the reasons behind your decision, you won’t follow through. 

Don't let fear motivate your decision making

And don’t wait for absolute certainty because you’ll almost never get it. One of the ways to overcome this is to have a consistent process for making decisions. 

Decision making is value clarification

You’re going to have to ask yourself, “Of all these things I want, what’s really no1 for me? If you’re clear on your priorities, it will be that much easier for you to design the best outcome for your life.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Decision-making errors

Most decision-making errors boil down to:

  • logical fallacies (over-generalizations, comparing apples and oranges, circular thinking)
  • limiting beliefs (underes...
Confirmation Bias

If you already have an opinion about something before you've even tried to figure it out, chances are you'll over-value information that confirms that opinion.

Think about what kinds of information you would expect to find to support alternative outcomes.

Attribution Bias

The “fundamental attribution error,” is when we excuse our own mistakes but blame other people for theirs.

Give other people the chance to explain themselves before judging their behavior.

2 more ideas

Not Making Good Decisions
We are exposed to biases that influence our ability to make good decisions.
  • We are quick to jump to conclusions because we fail to search for information that might disprove our thoughts.
The Four Villains of Decision Making
  • Narrow framing: The tendency to define our choices in binary terms. We ask, "should I, or shouldn't I?" instead of “What are the ways I could...?”
  • Confirmation bias: People tend to select the information that supports their preexisting attitudes, beliefs, and actions. 
  • Short-term emotion: When we’ve got a difficult decision to make, our feelings occupy our minds. And this doesn't add any new information that could benefit us. 
  • Overconfidence: People often think they know more than they actually do about how the future will unfold.
Defeating Decision-Making Villains
  • Counter narrow framing by widening your options. Expand your set of choices.
  • Confirmation bias leads you to gather self-serving information. Analyze and test your assumptions to overcome the bias.
  • Short-term emotion will tempt you to make the wrong choice. So distance yourself before deciding.
  • Prepare to be wrong. Don't be overconfident about how the future will unfold.
How To Make Better Decisions
How To Make Better Decisions
  • Analyze objectively your assumptions, feelings and expectations
  • Focusing only on the problem limits options for a solution and leads to energy depletion and decisi...
Situations That Lead To Bad Choices
  • You expect the worst: We focus only on the negative outcomes without giving attention to the possibility of an unexpected positive outcome.
  • You act on impulse: We act quickly, without considering the ramifications of our actions.
  • You cling to fear: The greater fear of failure or loss outweighs the likelihood of great reward.
  • You play victim: False pride comes between higher thought and an empowering choice.
  • You obsess over being in control: The need to be in control, which comes from a deeper feeling of being out of control, directs powerless choices.
  • You ignore good advice: Ego or the identification with a false self-image limits us from receiving help from encouraging input.
  • You overlook your hidden intentions: A deeper intention of wanting to fail keeps us from having to take to take full responsibility.