Pomodoro/Sprints - Deepstash

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Pomodoro/Sprints

Pomodoro/Sprints

Time commitment to get started: Low

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Desperately need to get something done and have a tendency to get distracted.

What it does: Helps you maintain focus for longer by splitting your work into short bursts.

Pomodoro is the most popular variation, though there are many others. With Pomodoro you work for 25 minutes, take a five-minute break, and then repeat until you’ve completed four sprints, after which you take a longer break. It’s that simple.

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Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract, visual

Perfect for people who: Need to prioritize tasks, but tend to go for lists over graphs.

What it does: Prioritizes your tasks by urgency, ensures that...

Time commitment to get started: Low

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Tend to put off important items, resulting in missed deadlines or rushed work.

What it does: Helps to avoid procrastination while ensuri...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Are in the early phases of a big project and need to strategize before jumping in.

What it does: Turns big, abstract ideas and goals ...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Spend too much time worrying about how much didn’t get done yesterday/have a lot of bad habits that prevent productivity.

What it does:

Time commitment to get started: High

Type: Abstract, visual

Perfect for people who: Love data and self-experimentation and want to optimize their days for maximum productivity.

What it does: Tracks your biologic...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract, visual, tactile

Perfect for people who: Feel overwhelmed with the number of things they need to do

What it does: Keeps track of everything you need...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Visual

Perfect for people who: Like graphs, have trouble seeing things in black-and-white, and would rather prioritize on a continuum than stuff tasks into a few categories.

W...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract, visual, tactile

Perfect for people who: Have a lot of loose ends rattling around in the brain and need a way organize it all.

What it does: Gets your though...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Are goal-oriented and/or are tackling complex projects and need to keep to a timeline.

What it does: Focuses on outcomes and prioriti...

Time commitment to get started: Medium

Type: Abstract

Perfect for people who: Need to turn creative brainstorming into an actionable to-do list.

What it does: Tidies up the messier aspects of creative work.

Time commitment to get started: Low

Type: Visual, abstract

Perfect for people who: Find small tasks and interruptions are taking over the whole day.

What it does: Holds you accountable to your daily plan by allo...

Time commitment to get started: Low

Type: Visual, Tactile

Perfect for people who: Have a tendency to start a lot of projects but finish very few of them.

What it does: Helps you visualize progress on all of your...

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