To prepare an agenda, consider the following factors: - Deepstash

To prepare an agenda, consider the following factors:

  • Priorities – what absolutely must be covered?
  • Results – what do you need to accomplish at the meeting?
  • Participants – who needs to attend the meeting for it to be successful?
  • Sequence – in what order will you cover the topics?
  • Timing – how much time will spend on each topic?
  • Date and time – when will the meeting take place?
  • Place – where will the meeting take place?

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MORE IDEAS FROM Running Effective Meetings: Establishing an Objective and Sticking to It

...to ensure maximum satisfaction for everyone:

  • If certain people are dominating the conversation, make a point of asking others for their ideas.
  • At the end of each agenda item, quickly summarize what was said.
  • Note items that require further discussions. 
  • Ensure the meeting stays on topic.
  • List all tasks that are generated at the meeting. Make a note of who is assigned to do what, and by when.

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  1. They achieve the meeting's objective.
  2. They take up a minimum amount of time.
  3. They leave participants feeling that a sensible process has been followed.

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An effective meeting serves a useful purpose. This means that in it, you achieve a desired outcome.

For a meeting to meet this outcome, or objective, you have to be clear about what it is.

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RELATED IDEA

....is the most important component for conducting more effective meetings.

It establishes the parameters, organizes the terms of reference and tells everybody in the room why they are there, for how long, and what they need to accomplish.

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Everyone should know why they've gathered

Set the agenda for the meeting. It can be summarized on a handout, written on a whiteboard, or discussed explicitly at the outset.

While it may seem obvious to set an agenda, many meetings start with no clear idea of the purpose.

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  1. Decide if the meeting is necessary in the first place.
  2. Establish a clear purpose for the meeting and write up an agenda.
  3. Start on time and stop on time.
  4. Cover important items first.
  5. Summarize each conclusion and get closure.
  6. Assign specific responsibility. Be clear about who is going to do what and when.
  7. Keep notes and circulate minutes.

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