How to handle disruptive technologies - Deepstash
How to handle disruptive technologies

How to handle disruptive technologies

"If history is any guide, companies that keep disruptive technologies bottled up in their labs, working to improve them until they suit mainstream markets, will not be nearly as successful as firms that find markets that embrace the attributes of disruptive technologies as they initially stand. "

Disruptive technologies will eventually follow a steep curve with enough iterations and intersect the mainstream market technologies. That would be the right time to invade them.

3

STASHED IN:

7

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

What Is Jobs To Be Done Theory

JOBS-TO-BE-DONE is a perspective — a lens through which you can observe markets, customers, needs, competitors, and customer segments differently, and by doing so, make innovation far more predictable and profitable.

  • Markets aren’t defined around products, but groups of people trying to get a job done.
  • Customers aren’t buyers, they are job executors.
  • Competitors aren’t just companies that make products like yours, they are any solution used to get the job done.
  • Customer segments aren’t based on demographics or psychographics, they are based on how customers struggle differently to get a job done.

10

STASHED IN:

16

Jobs to be done is an important form of business problem solving and user centred design

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Leadership development is viewed as a current and future priority. Despite efforts to produce and nurture new leaders, only 7 percent of senior managers think that their companies develop global leaders effectively. Around 30 percent of US companies admit that they lack enough leaders with the right capabilities.

5

STASHED IN:

163

Steve Jobs has always been considered an anomaly in management: his leadership style was something to admire or to criticize, but definitely not to replicate. 

He was navigating a territory that is often obscure to management: the creation of meaning, both for customers and employees.

3

STASHED IN:

123

STASHED IN:

0 Comments