Small Talk Questions About Food - Deepstash

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48 Questions That'll Make Small Talk Easier

Small Talk Questions About Food

  • If you could only eat one thing for the rest of your life, what would it be?
  • What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten?
  • What’s your go-to comfort food?
  • Are there any foods that you absolutely would not eat?
  • What are the best cheap eats around here?
  • Does your family have any “secret” or famous recipes?

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Three different sides of risk
  • The odds you will get hit.
  • The average consequences of getting hit.
  • The tail-end consequences of getting hit.

The first two are...

The tail-end consequences

The tail-end consequences of an action or event (those with low-probability, high-impact) are all that matter.

In investing, the average consequences of risk make up most of the daily news headlines. But the tail-end consequences of risk (for example, pandemics and depressions) are what make the pages of history books.

Some downsides are unavoidable
Some downsides are unavoidable

Life is a little easier if you expect a certain chunk of it to go wrong no matter how hard you try.

Smart people screw up. Good people have bad days. Nice people lose their temper....

How we think about risk and opportunity

It’s impossible to think about risk and opportunity without a reference point. And ours is at most incomplete (if not totally wrong).

Everything we think about risk and opportunity is shaped by our own specific situation and personal experience. So everybody has a view of risk shaped by narrow experiences but applied to the broad world.

Long-term and short-term thinking

Long-term thinking is difficult to put in action because the long run is a collection of short runs that have to be handled, displayed, and used as information to gauge whether a long-term reward still exists.

Short-term thinking can be the only way you’ll survive long enough to experience long-term results.

Two of the biggest innovations
Two of the biggest innovations

Two of the biggest innovations of modern times are cars and airplanes. At first, every new invention looks like a toy. It takes decades for people to realise the potential of it.

Innovation is driven by incentives

There are three types of incentives:

  1. "If I don't figure this out, I might get fired." It will get you moving.
  2. "If I figure this out, I might help people and make a lot of money." It will produce creativity.
  3. "If we don't figure this out now, our very existence is threatened." Militaries deal with this, and it will fuel the most incredible problem-solving and innovation in a short time.

During World War II, there was a burst of scientific progress that took place. The government was in effect saying that if a discovery had any possible war value, then it had to be developed and put in use, regardless of the expense.

The conditions for big innovations to happen

The biggest innovations seldom happen when everyone's happy or safe. They happen when people are a little panicked and worried, and when they have to act quickly.

In 1932, the stock market fell by 89%. It was an economic disaster where almost a quarter of Americans were out of work. However, the 1930s was also the most productive and technologically progressive decade in history. Economist Alex Field writes that in 1941, the U.S. economy produced almost 40 percent more output than it had in 1929, with little increase in labor hours or private-sector capital input.