Talking to Your Kids About Sex/Sensitive Topics - Deepstash

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Top 10 Uncomfortable Situations and How to Deal with Them

Talking to Your Kids About Sex/Sensitive Topics

Talking to Your Kids About Sex/Sensitive Topics
  • Birds and Bees and Kids is a site that can help broach sex with your kids more comfortably.
  • When talking about drugs, racial issues, or death, the most important thing is to meet the child where they are first and answer honestly and factually, however uncomfortable the situation might feel. Kids are taking their cues from you.

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EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Awkward Work Scenarios
Awkward Work Scenarios
  1. Others taking credit for your work: speak up when presenting your joint ideas, else the boss will remember that the other was the one who did all the talking.
Decreasing Awkwardness
Decreasing Awkwardness
  • Find common interests and discuss them.
  • Encourage others to talk about what interests them.
  • Be gentle or help someone out, even if it is on a small thing.
Situations That Lead To Awkwardness
  • Walking into a room where you don't know any of the other people.
  • Being in a situation in which you don't know what you are supposed to do.
  • You are all talking amongst yourself and an unknown person approaches the group.
  • When a conversation does not go smoothly. 
  • Discomfort around food. 
  • Invading someone else's personal space—or having your own space invaded.
  • Not remembering someone or their name or not being remembered.
  • Been put in the spotlight or when others start talking about you while you are in the same room.
Dealing with negative people

It's primarily about learning to differentiate between the opinions you should consider and the ones you should ignore.

You'll always run into negative people, so the best thing you ca...

Find the critic's baseline

... before you assume they are being negative.

By spending a little time figuring out how they usually are (if they are optimistic, pessimistic or pragmatic), you will be able to differentiate between the times that they are just being themselves versus the times that they may be recognizing something truly noteworthy.

Follow the "Three's company" rule

Just because a person's a pessimist doesn't mean they're not right. And an easy way to figure if their advice is worth following is to simply ask around and figure out if a consensus exists that falls in line with the person's view.

If it's a unanimous opinion, then perhaps that person isn't as pessimistic as you think, and you should consider their advice.