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Problem Solving

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Creative Organizing and Mental Processing

When we write things down we are given more creative freedom to do what we want to do and write what we want to write.

You have the chance to organize things that goes beyond the line-by-line offered by most note-taking and to-do list apps.

@jam_iee52

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Problem Solving

Things that are written down are always readily accessible whenever you need them even when you're in the midst of distraction and it won't encourage you to get distracted even further.

We're not denying the fact that to-do list apps and note-taking apps are handy, but once we turn off our screens and put them away, we tend to forget about them.

Like what they say "out of sight, out of mind."

When writing we are limited both in physical space (pages of a notebook) and physical ability (we can't write without getting tired).

Thus with these limitations, we are forced to decide what's more important. We pay more attention to what we write a little more carefully, snip out the less important ones and keep the ones worth writing.

Writing By Hand  Boosts Your Memory Through Encoding

Writing something down manually (by hand) improves our ability to recall information through the process of encoding.

Our brain uses more processing systems when we write by hand than when we type because we're physically coordinating our brain and hands. Ultimately, we're forced to organize information in a concise manner and.

Leaders understand the complexity of making decisions. Their decisions must always align with these three dimensions:

  1. Ethics
  2. Morals
  3. Responsibilities of their role

To no one's surprise, these elements come into dispute from time to time. When this occurs, there are no simple answers but by closely considering these three aspects, leaders will go on confidently that the choices they make represent the best possible compromise between their values.

Being able to comprehend who you are and what kind of leader you are is important to cover the three dimensions of making decisions.

To know who you are as a leader try asking yourself these:

  • Am I the leader I wanted to be before I acquired this position? What are my values?
  • What are the values of the company I am representing? Is it looking to maximize value?
  • What are my obligations as a leader and which should be held accountable towards me?

As a leader it is also important to check whether the problem that you are currently facing has been faced by other before. By researching about the answer given by the company and what was the public's opinion regarding it.

You should be able to identify whether the decision you are about to make will fully align with your ethics, moral, and role responsibilities. Is there a need to adjust anything from your perspective? Always make sure to evaluate yourself before doing anything rash.

Once you've gotten to know who you are as a leader and you've evaluated you decision. It is time to strategize a way on how you'll be able to reveal your decision.

You need to keep in mind that there will be times where you have to stand your ground with the decision. Acknowledge that you should sort out all the inconsistencies that could happen when communicating. It is important to make sure that the audience will be able to understand the why's and the how's.

After making a big decision it is crucial to ask yourself:

  • Was I being completely honest with myself in my earlier articulation of my values?
  • What values do put first and at whose expense will my values affect?

Allow yourself to reconcile any inconsistencies and any dilemmas you might still have within yourself. Understand that you are allowing yourself to explore your own decision-making thought process which can make you a better decision maker to the next challenge you face.

The River Of Creativity

Most people do not realize that being persistent is a virtue in a creative process.

A person’s first ideas are rarely their most creative ones, as one generally goes through a lengthy brainstorming process, and has to list out and shaft through a large number of nominations.

This is a fallacy where one assumes that their creativity is diminishing with each output.

As the modern workforce faces never-before-seen challenges, it is crucial to harness the creativity of the employees by setting the right expectations of the creative process and to empower them to generate more ingenious ideas.

A manager should educate their subordinates/team members that their reservoir of ideas will keep flowing and they should not believe that they are now running out of ideas.

They should be encouraged to push their cognitive boundaries and look for innovative connections.

There are several ways to give creativity a boost:

  1. Set aside ample time for free, divergent thinking.
  2. Ask for more ideas on a regular basis, keeping the engine running.
  3. Build a tracker which documents the ideas and the time taken to generate them.
  4. Compare results among teams to calibrate your process and to capture the teams full creative potential.
Biophilic design

Biophilic design is a concept of using both direct and indirect exposure to nature to increase wellbeing.

Leading up to 2020, biophilic design was a major office trend. Amazon introduced spherical conservatories to its Seattle headquarters, and Facebook created a 3.6-acre rooftop garden at its Silicon Valley hub. Due to the pandemic, remote workers can bring the concept back home with them and create a work environment with their own wellbeing in mind.

Phillophilic design is about bringing nature in all its forms, including patterns, materials, shapes, spaces, smells, sights, and sounds, into the urban design on varying scales.

Adding greenery is the most obvious starting point. Other additions are light and colour. Natural light supports the circadian rhythms of the body, which regulate our sleep-wake cycle and hormones. Earth tones can also have an array of positive psychological and physiological effects. However, colours should represent a healthy nature such as forest greens, sky blues, or savannah browns. Look outside and see how you can bring those colours inside.

Objects that move in a constant and unpredictable motion improve blood pressure and heart rate and positively affect the sympathetic nervous system.

This can be incorporated into the home office by adding waving grass outside a window or a fishbowl on a desk. Other relics to add are seashells, geometric forms, or stones.

When things start to feel cluttered, you may have gone overboard.

Taking walks in nature may add to the multisensory benefits, but most spend more than 90% of their time indoors, which creates an urgency to bring nature inside.

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

The ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind can be applied in many decision-making scenarios, thinking processes and negotiation techniques.

This approach to thinking can prevent you from jumping to conclusions when faced with a difficult situation.

Be open to other ideas besides your own thinking model.

Understanding and empathizing with both sides of an issue, idea or thought, allows you to make strategic decisions in life and business.

Look at things from different perspectives and use them to strengthen your capacity for thought.

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