Time Management

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The Monk Mode Morning

Several accomplished people have adopted the Monk Mode Morning Routine: Not doing anything from the time of waking till noon, just focusing on deep, meaningful work on something valuable.

This means:

  1. No meetings or calls.
  2. No texts, emails or Slack.
  3. No internet(social media or news reading).
  4. No TV.

@brantley410

Time Management

  • Using the Monk Mode Morning Routine, the A.M. time (the time we wake up till noon) is simply spent on doing something deep and meaningful, like writing a book, Yoga, or reading good books.
  • There is no inconsistency in this life hack, and a four to six-hour progress can be made every day in whatever is valuable to us.
  • With the rising ‘flexible work’ routines where most work is done at home using various digital devices, the Monk Mode is picking up great speed.
Most Of Us Are Overworked

The hustle fallacy is a common belief that by working harder, putting in more hours, and grinding throughout the day, we can get ahead of others and find success.

Overworking, which often leads to burnout, bad relationships, health issues and low-quality output is a product of decades-old work cultures across the world, and most of us post-2020 are either workaholics or recovering from it.

  • Realize that work-life balance is possible if you want it to happen.
  • Understand that work isn’t the primary orientation of life, just something you do to live better. Your priority shouldn’t be work, but the good life you will lead because of your work and your earnings.
  • Constraints do not stifle productivity but enhance it.
  • One shouldn’t always be busy. Productivity actually means working smarter and faster to free yourself from work and go live your life.
  • Rest is not something done by lazy people. We all are in a dire need of daily rest, restoration and relaxation, which we are completely neglecting.
Our schedules are filled to the brim

When we look at our calendar, we often notice that every hour is filled with something - almost as if we don't like being left alone with ourselves with nothing to do.

But our inner lives are in great need of attention. It takes the absence of an agenda to really learn about ourselves. It takes quiet and time.

Once a week, clear your calendar, remove any social obligations, turn off your notifications, let your projects sit idle and make space for what could happen.

You matter without the stuff, the outside approval, without the career, or the friends. It is worth having a "do nothing" day just to be you.

  • Set the day aside and make it known to people close to you so that they can support you.
  • Don't stress about it. Wake up, and resist the urge to do stuff.
  • Pay attention. Notice when you have an urge to check your phone or make a call. Depriving yourself of everyday stuff will reveal what you really need.
  • Listen to your heart. Don't just do something, Wait. Ask yourself if this is something you really want to do?
  • Spend some time in silence.
Why We Love The To-Do List

The To-Do list is almost a sacred technique of organizing your day and eventually your life. They lessen the day’s anxiety, provide a structure to power-through and are written proof of our productivity.

As the Zeigarnik Effect proves, we obsess over unfinished tasks and remember stuff which is incomplete or pending. The To-Do list comes to the rescue and saves us from a lot of stress.

Studies show that our mind performs better when we use written to-do lists. Here are some ways to make them more effective:

  1. List entries should be detailed, having a clear purpose.
  2. Paper and pen lists, preferably in a dairy, work best.
  3. Make the work schedule realistic, factoring in all the time that is wasted gossiping or on social media.
  4. Do not list heavy, unworkable projects(A: Climb Mount Everest) as they would never be done. Break them into small, actionable items.
Practice Vs Routine

Routines, as we now learn, are fragile, but our practices, like doing some exercise or meditation, eating vegetarian or plant-based food, journaling, live on due to their being flexible and tailored for the individual.

The pandemic has shown us that most of our routines, like sending our kids to school, going to the gym, or rushing to office in the morning, can be easily disrupted or even exhumed.

Most of us have a different set of routines that seems to work for us. However, the fundamental practices like exercising, writing, reading, walking and having some moments of reflection are almost universal in nature.

These practices transcend every routine and become lifelong pursuits.

Most of us are facing an upheaval in our professional fronts, and have drastic changes in our routines. The order may change, but the basic practices should remain the same.

Work may be erratic, and there may be good and bad days, but one has to hold on to the basic practices.

Apart from the basic practices like walking, or writing, a few more to consider:

  1. Don’t use the phone for an hour after waking up.
  2. Don’t watch too much news on TV.
  3. Don’t be too accessible to everyone all the time.
  4. Don’t do more than a handful of tasks in a day, if possible.
  5. Don’t use WiFi on aeroplanes, if you still fly.

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