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CONTENT FROM:
In the Era of Screens, Rest is Crucial
3 insights
Mental Models I Find Repeatedly Useful - Gabriel Weinberg
2 insights
We’re Thinking About Organizational Culture All Wrong
2 insights
The Intuitive and the Unlearnable – Christina Wodtke – Medium
2 insights
Why a “genius” scientist thinks our consciousness originates at the quantum level
2 insights
Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Naval Ravikant chat
2 insights
Seven Ways to Create a Friction-Free Knowledge Base
1 insight
Empathy doesn’t mean “be nice”
1 insight
How To Start — When You’ve Procrastinated On Your Goals For Too Long
1 insight
Nine qualities of effective feedback
1 insight
The Sunk Cost Fallacy Is Ruining Your Decisions. Here's How
1 insight
Happiness & the Gorilla | The Daily
1 insight
The Genius Study: What Determines Creative Success?
1 insight
How to Age Well - Well Guides
1 insight
The Difference Between Effectiveness and Efficiency Explained
1 insight
The Science Behind Being Funny. This Is No Joke.
1 insight
Isaac Asimov: Integrity over Honesty
1 insight
The Curse of Culture – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
1 insight
Why can’t we read anymore? – Hugh McGuire – Medium
1 insight
The “fearless entrepreneur” is a myth: why you don’t have to take risks to build a successful…
1 insight
The Art of Lying - Scientific American
1 insight
For a More Creative Brain, Follow These 5 Steps
1 insight
29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
1 insight
Why We Want Things We Don’t Need — And What to Do About It
1 insight
Self-Evaluation: The Genesis of all Improvement
1 insight
Don’t Fuck Up the Culture – Brian Chesky – Medium
1 insight
How to Address Problems Directly Without Being a Jerk
1 insight
The Truth about How Creativity Really Works – The Mission – Medium
1 insight
Simple Ways to Be Better at Remembering
1 insight
On how to grow an idea – The Creative Independent
1 insight
The Craftsman Approach: Master Your Work Through Deliberate Practice
1 insight
The One Routine Common to Billionaires, Icons and World-Class Performers
1 insight
PART 1: Learn How to Memorize – Top 6 Memorization Techniques
1 insight
The Secret to Living a Meaningful Life
1 insight
The Hughtrain (2018 version) | #hughtrain
1 insight
Top 10 Tips for Better Writing
1 insight
Micah Rosenbloom on Twitter
1 insight
The right way to be introspective (yes, there’s a wrong way) |
1 insight
6 Key Success Factors For A High-Performing Culture
1 insight
The Culture Cliché – Signal v. Noise
1 insight
Second-Order Thinking: What Smart People Use to Outperform
1 insight
Sam Harris on the Paradox of Meditation and How to Stretch Our Capacity for Everyday Self-Transcendence – Brain Pickings
1 insight
Scaling: The surprising mathematics of life and civilization
1 insight
Invisible asymptotes — Remains of the Day
1 insight
Blaise Pascal on the Intuitive vs. the Logical Mind and How We Come to Know Truth – Brain Pickings
1 insight
Analytics Without the Numbers ? Explaining Our Early Product Design Decisions
1 insight
8 Keys to Coming Off as the Expert in Whatever You Sell
1 insight
Radical Efficiency – Rands in Repose
1 insight
29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
1 insight
Don't Look for a Great Idea. Look for a Good Problem
1 insight
Stop Chasing Success. Seek Significance.
1 insight
Expectancy Theory of Motivation
1 insight
How to Throw Stuff Away Without Any Regret
1 insight
If You Want To Go Fast, Go Alone. If You Want To Go Far, Go Together
1 insight
The right effort of generosity
1 insight
The Difference Between Open-Minded and Closed-Minded People
1 insight
Why are creative projects so hard to start?
1 insight
International Jazz Day: What jazz improv reveals about creativity in the brain
1 insight
9 Benefits Of Sharing Best Practices In An Organization
1 insight
8 Tips On Becoming a Power Napping Expert – The Ascent
1 insight
Navalism — Quotes & Perceptions by Naval Ravikant – Noah Madden – Medium
1 insight
Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition
1 insight
The Many, Many Problems With “Follow Your Passion”
1 insight
Are You Behind In Your Leadership? 3 Approaches To Collaborative Leadership
1 insight
72 INSIGHTs ON: Brain6Culture5Organizational Culture5Health5Life4Sleep4Creativity4Leadership3Company Culture3Feedback3Sleeping3Neuroscience3Theory3Memory3Thinking2Nassim Taleb2UX2Problem solving2Relationships2Strategy2Mental models2Work2Decision Making2Performance2Consciousness2Antifragility2Choice2Skin in the Game2
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On the awesomeness of wearing multiple hats
Not being the best in any one field does not mean you can't shine at something. If you are mediocre at a lot of seemingly unrelated things you can still kick ass. A mediocre meditator with coding skills can make the most amazing meditation app, because those skills are not usually paired together. 
1 month, 1 week ago
1
Expectancy Theory of Motivation
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Expectancy theory (or expectancy theory of motivation)

Expectancy theory is about the mental processes regarding choice, or choosing. 

The theory states that the intensity of a tendency to perform in a particular manner is dependent on the intensity of an expectation that the performance will be followed by a definite outcome and on the appeal of the outcome to the individual.

In essence, the motivation of the behavior selection is determined by the desirability of the outcome. 

It explains the processes that an individual undergoes to make choices.

1 month, 2 weeks ago
Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Naval Ravikant chat
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Intellectual Yet Idiot (IYI)

Intellectual Yet Idiot: semi-erudite who thinks he is an erudite; pathologies others for doing things he doesn't understand not realising it is his understanding that may be limited. A theoretician who despises practitioners. In the words ofNassim Taleb


More socially: subscribes to the New Yorker; never curses on twitter; speaks of "equality of races" and "economic equality" but never went out drinking with a minority cab driver; has considered voting for Tony Blair; has attended more than 1 TEDx talks and watched more than 2 TED talks; will vote for Hillary Monsanto-Malmaison because she seems electable; has The Black Swan on his shelves but mistakes absence of evidence for evidence of absence; is member of a club to get traveling privileges; if social scientist uses statistics without knowing how they are derived; when in the UK goes to literary festivals; drinks red wine with steak (never white); used to believe that fat was harmful and has now completely reversed; takes statins because his doctor told him so; fails to understand ergodicity and when explained forgets about it soon later; doesn't use Yiddish words; studies grammar before speaking a language; has a cousin who worked with someone who knows the Queen; has never read Frederic Dard, Michael Oakeshot, John Gray, or Joseph De Maistre; has never gotten drunk with Russians and went breaking glasses; doesn't know the difference between Hecate and Hecuba; doesn't know that there is no difference between "pseudointellectual" and "intellectual"; has mentioned quantum mechanics at least twice in the past 5 years; knows at any point in time what his words or actions are doing to his reputation.
But a much easier marker: doesn't deadlift.
1 month, 4 weeks ago
Deepstash
1
Nassim Nicholas Taleb and Naval Ravikant chat
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The only person you should try to impress is your accountant
Be aware of industries where you try to impress your peers: Journalism, academia etc. You have to be judged by the customers. 


Funny story:At a restaurant award ceremony many of the restaurants who won the awards were bankrupt by the time of the gala. The market does not care about your award. 
1 month, 4 weeks ago
Deepstash
1
Micah Rosenbloom on Twitter
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"Often giving business advice is like saying, I won the lottery, want to play my numbers?"
2 months ago
1
Unknown Unknowns: The Problem of Hypocognition
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The perils of hypocognition

It is facing a concept that captures something we cannot fathom, an exotic emotion we cannot grasp, a certain idea that arouses in others fervor and enthusiasm but strikes us as nothing but foreign and bizarre, a certain principle that must, against our own reason, be unreasonable.

Amid pitched political battles, partisans see only the concepts associated with their own side, hypocognitive of the principles that support the judgments of their ideological opponents.
3 months, 3 weeks ago
Simple Ways to Be Better at Remembering
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There are two main kinds of memories: 

  • explicit, which are created through conscious experience;
  •  implicit, which form when past experiences affect us, sometimes without our knowledge, as in reacting with fear in dangerous situations or getting sweaty palms when you see a dog if you were once bitten.
4 months, 1 week ago
PART 1: Learn How to Memorize – Top 6 Memorization Techniques
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Memory is the brains way of integrating sensory-motor information into a symbolic representation that allows prediction of future occurrences. This is the evolutionary basis for memory. When trying to commit information to memory, it is important to engage with the material in a fashion that complements how your brain naturally performs this task.
4 months, 1 week ago
Don’t Fuck Up the Culture – Brian Chesky – Medium
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Culture is simply a shared way of doing something with passion.
4 months, 1 week ago
8 Tips On Becoming a Power Napping Expert – The Ascent
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Power Napping Tips
  • Don’t power nap if you’re not tired enough. 
  • Put an alarm. The alarm frees you from thinking about waking up on time.
  • Don’t nap for more than 15 +/- 5 minutes. 
  • Cut off the distractions. 
  • Be comfortable but not too much. Napping in a comfortable bed makes it hard to get out. 
  • A “successful” nap is not always about sleeping. I don’t always fall asleep. You still gain energy back from relaxing.
  • It takes some time to recover from the nap. Plan for 15–20 minutes to be back to full energy. 
  • Don’t nap when it’s close to bedtime. By close, I mean less than 3–4 hours. 
4 months, 1 week ago
Why can’t we read anymore? – Hugh McGuire – Medium
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Those who read own the world, and those who watch television lose it- Werner Herzog

4 months, 1 week ago
The Truth about How Creativity Really Works – The Mission – Medium
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“Maybe that’s enlightenment enough: to know that there is no final resting place of the mind; no moment of smug clarity. Perhaps wisdom…is realizing how small I am, and unwise, and how far I have yet to go.”Anthony Bourdain
4 months, 1 week ago
The Genius Study: What Determines Creative Success?
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To do interesting work, you have to be interesting. To produce complexity, you have to live it.
4 months, 1 week ago
The Sunk Cost Fallacy Is Ruining Your Decisions. Here's How
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The sunk cost effect

The sunk cost effect  is the general tendency for people to continue an endeavor, or continue consuming or pursuing an option, if they’ve invested time or money or some resource in it.That effect becomes a fallacy if it’s pushing you to do things that are making you unhappy or worse off.

If you’ve ever let unworn clothes clutter your closet just because they were expensive, or followed through on plans you were dreading because you already bought tickets, you’re familiar with the sunk cost fallacy.

4 months, 2 weeks ago
The Difference Between Effectiveness and Efficiency Explained
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Effectiveness vs. Efficiency

Effective (adj.) – Adequate to accomplish a purpose; producing the intended or expected result.

Efficient (adj.) – Performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort.

Being effective is about doing the right things, while being efficient is about doing things right.

4 months, 2 weeks ago
The One Routine Common to Billionaires, Icons and World-Class Performers
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“We do not rise to the level of our expectations. We fall to the level of our training.”— Archilochus
4 months, 2 weeks ago
Nine qualities of effective feedback
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Effective Feedback
Feedback is effective when it sheds light on the present and offers a window into the future — without dwelling on the past.


Feedback isn’t effective when it inflates — or bruises — someone’s ego.
4 months, 2 weeks ago
3
The “fearless entrepreneur” is a myth: why you don’t have to take risks to build a successful…
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Working without feedback is a major risk. It is probably the biggest risk you can take.

4 months, 2 weeks ago
1
Seven Ways to Create a Friction-Free Knowledge Base
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Name notes for easy finding

This is an exercise in metacognition — monitoring the ways that you think. 

The basic question is: When I search for this note in the future, what key words will I use?Put those words in the title of the note.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
1
In the Era of Screens, Rest is Crucial
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Dreaming is a psychotic state
Every time we experience REM sleep, we literally go mad. By definition, psychosis is a condition characterized by hallucinations and delusions. Dreaming, some sleep scientists say, is a psychotic state—we fully believe that we see what is not there, and we accept that time, location, and people themselves can morph and disappear without warning.
4 months, 3 weeks ago
In the Era of Screens, Rest is Crucial
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Sleep is about the preservation of life

Sleep (unlike hibernation or coma), exists in creatures without brains at all- Jellyfish sleep and one-celled organisms such as plankton and yeast display clear cycles of activity and rest. 

This implies that sleep is ancient and that its original and universal function is not about organizing memories or promoting learning but more about the preservation of life itself.It’s evidently natural law that a creature, no matter the size, cannot go full throttle 24 hours a day.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
In the Era of Screens, Rest is Crucial
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Sleep reinforces our memory
Sleep reinforces our memory so powerfully that it might be best, for example, if exhausted soldiers returning from harrowing missions did not go directly to bed. 

Research suggests that sleeping soon after a major event, before some of the ordeal is mentally resolved, is more likely to turn the experience into long-term memories.

To forestall post-traumatic stress disorder, the soldiers should remain awake for six to eight hours. 

4 months, 3 weeks ago
Why are creative projects so hard to start?
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Creativity usually benefits from the constraints of having inferior tools

We avoid startingby requiring the fanciest tools. Running a marathon? Buys the most expensive shoes. Want to write more?Gets notebooks and pens shipped from Japan

The need for tools is part of the Resistance. In fact, creativity usually benefits from the constraints of having inferior tools.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
1
Top 10 Tips for Better Writing
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Tips for Better Writing
  • Organize Your Thoughts Before Writing
  • Set a Regular Schedule
  • Keep Up with Good Grammar
  • Use Distraction-Free Writing Tools
  • Learn From Other Good Writers
  • Know Your Most Common Mistakes and Avoid Them
  • Beat Writer's Block
  • Remember Why You're Writing
4 months, 3 weeks ago
Sam Harris on the Paradox of Meditation and How to Stretch Our Capacity for Everyday Self-Transcendence – Brain Pickings
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Although the insights we can have in meditation tell us nothing about the origins of the universe, they do confirm some well-established truths about the human mind: Our conventional sense of self is an illusion; positive emotions, such as compassion and patience, are teachable skills; and the way we think directly influences our experience of the world. - Sam Harris

4 months, 3 weeks ago
The right way to be introspective (yes, there’s a wrong way) |
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Asking “why?” can sometimes cause our brains to mislead us

The problem with introspection isn’t that it’s categorically ineffective, but that we don’t always do it right. When we examine the causes of our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors — which we often do by asking ourselves Why? questionswe tend to search for the easiest and most plausible answers. Generally, once we’ve found one or two, we stop looking. This can be the result of our innate confirmation bias, which prompts us to lean towards reasons that confirm our existing beliefs.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
Why a “genius” scientist thinks our consciousness originates at the quantum level
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The global workspace theory of consciousness
Developed by neuroscientist Bernard Baars, this theory says that maybe consciousness is simply the act of broadcasting information around the brain from a memory bank.
4 months, 3 weeks ago
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Why a “genius” scientist thinks our consciousness originates at the quantum level
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The integrated information theory for explaining consciousness
Created by neuroscientist Giulio Tononi, this theory proposes that conscious experience is an integration of a great of amount of information that comes into our brain, and that this experience is irreducible. Your brain interweaves a sophisticated information web from sensory and cognitive inputs.
4 months, 3 weeks ago
The Art of Lying - Scientific American
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Lying is among the most sophisticated and demanding accomplishments of the human brain

Children have to learn how to lie; people with certain types of frontal lobe injuries may not be able to do it.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
Mental Models I Find Repeatedly Useful - Gabriel Weinberg
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Selection Bias
“The selection of individuals, groups or data for analysis in such a way that proper randomization is not achieved, thereby ensuring that the sample obtained is not representative of the population intended to be analyzed.”
4 months, 4 weeks ago
Mental Models I Find Repeatedly Useful - Gabriel Weinberg
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Lateral Thinking
“Solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.”
4 months, 4 weeks ago
The Craftsman Approach: Master Your Work Through Deliberate Practice
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Mastery is not the equivalent of perfectionism and is not the same as success. Mastery is not merely a commitment to a goal, but to a curved-line, constant pursuit.Sarah Lewis

4 months, 4 weeks ago
1
The Intuitive and the Unlearnable – Christina Wodtke – Medium
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Intuition is compressed experience.
5 months ago
1
The Intuitive and the Unlearnable – Christina Wodtke – Medium
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“… all meaning comes from analogy”

Hofstadter agrees “… all meaning comes from analogy.” 

5 months ago
1
How to Age Well - Well Guides
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Smart choices for aging well

  • Eat- Small changes in your eating habits can lower your risk for many of the diseases associated with aging.
  • Move- A body in motion will age better than one on the couch.
  • Think  - Aging well means taking care of both the body and the mind. Most of what we do to keep our bodies fit is also good for the brain.
  • Connect - Staying in touch with family and friends — and forming new relationships — can keep you healthier longer and may add years to your life.

5 months ago
Isaac Asimov: Integrity over Honesty
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Integrity over Honesty

Honesty” often implies truth-telling and little more, but “integrity” implies wholeness, soundness, a complex philosophy of life.

To have integrity is to stand by your word, to have a sense of honor, to do what you have agreed to do and to do it as best as you can.To have integrity is to be satisfied with nothing less than the best job you can do. - Isaac Asimov


5 months ago
Analytics Without the Numbers ? Explaining Our Early Product Design Decisions
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“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

— Leonardo da Vinci

5 months, 2 weeks ago
2
We’re Thinking About Organizational Culture All Wrong
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Culture=Web of Power Relationships
Fundamentally,a culture is not a set of (marginally) shared values; it’s a web of power relationships in which people are embedded and that they use to meet both personal and collective goals but that can also restrict their ability to achieve goals

Those power relationships can function to pull people together, but they also can pull them apart because they are the product of differential access to resources. And differences in power influence how we respond to and think about values espoused as being shared by members of a group.

5 months, 2 weeks ago
We’re Thinking About Organizational Culture All Wrong
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Culture is not about bringing people together
The idea that unity can be generated among employees by fixing or creating an organizational culture relies on a naïve assumption that culture unambiguously brings people together. But the reality of culture is that it represents a tremendously complex variable that can both bring people together and pull them apart — or do both at the same time.
5 months, 2 weeks ago
The Culture Cliché – Signal v. Noise
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The 3 levels of organizational culture

1.Artifacts: Artifacts are things you can see, touch, smell. Ping pong tables, happy hours, and free lunches. It’s also the office layout, the logo rebranding you just did, and your company holiday party. This is typically what we think of when it comes to company culture.

2. Espoused values and beliefs: These are the things you think you believe and say you believe. It’s the mission statement you wrote together as a company, the code of conduct that’s in your employee handbook, or the six core company values your CEO talks about during your all-staff meeting.

3. Basic underlying assumptions:The final, core layer of culture. Basic underlying assumptions are the things you actually believe. Basic underlying assumption steer our decision-making. Our basic underlying assumptions are the foundation of culture. If we can influence our basic underlying assumptions, we can influence culture.

[Edgar Schein].

5 months, 2 weeks ago
2
Second-Order Thinking: What Smart People Use to Outperform
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“Experience is what you got when you didn’t get what you wanted". - Howard Marks

5 months, 3 weeks ago
2
Scaling: The surprising mathematics of life and civilization
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Scaling, in its most elemental form, it simply refers to how systems respond when their sizes change.

What happens to cities or companies if their sizes are doubled? Asking question like that has had remarkably profound consequences across the spectrum of science, engineering, and technology and has impacted almost every aspect of our lives, even including how we perceive our place in the universe.

In a more practical context, scaling plays a critical role in the design of increasingly large human engineered artifacts, such as buildings, bridges, ships, airplanes, and computers, where extrapolating from the small to the large in an efficient, cost-effective fashion is a continuing challenge. 

5 months, 3 weeks ago
Blaise Pascal on the Intuitive vs. the Logical Mind and How We Come to Know Truth – Brain Pickings
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The greater intellect one has, the more originality one finds in men. Ordinary persons find no difference between men. - Blaise Pascal

5 months, 3 weeks ago
Stop Chasing Success. Seek Significance.
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“I cannot believe that the purpose of life is to be happy. I think the purpose of life is to be useful, to be responsible, to be compassionate. It is, above all to matter, to count, to stand for something, to have made some difference that you lived at all.” —Leo Rosten
6 months ago
The Many, Many Problems With “Follow Your Passion”
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Research shows that what you should be looking for is work that is engaging:

The best predictors of job satisfaction are features of the job itself, rather than matters of pre-existing passion. 

Engaging work can be broken down into five factors:

  • Independence:How much control do you have over how you go about your work?
  • Sense of completion: How much does the job involve completing whole pieces of work so that your contribution to the end product is easily visible?
  • Variety: How far does the job require you to perform a range of different activities, using different skills and talents?
  • Feedback from the job: How easy is it to know whether you’re performing well or poorly?
  • Contribution: How much does your work “make a difference,” improving the well-being of other people?
6 months ago
6 Key Success Factors For A High-Performing Culture
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Creating A High-Performing Culture: Key Success Factors

1. There’s Not One “Right” Model Of Corporate Culture;

2. What You Measure, You Can Manage;

3. Organizations Don’t Change; People Do;

4. Start At The Top And The Bottom;

5. Dialogue Is Key;

6. Transformation Takes Time.





6 months ago
Are You Behind In Your Leadership? 3 Approaches To Collaborative Leadership
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3 Strategies To Embrace And Enhance Collaborative Leadership

1. The Blueprint Of We is a collaboration document and ongoing process used to mindfully custom design business and personal relationships. You personally write the document along with those involved, whether two people or 20,000+. It captures what draws each individual to the situation, enables you to let others know how you work best, helps you mindfully design the framework of the collaboration, and provides a path back to peace when the need arises. As an ongoing collaborative process, it wires your brain for more connection and compassion and enables groups of all sizes to continually find clarity. It is often being used to replace or enhance traditional legal contracts.

2. MurderBoardingprovides a framework for a group to arrive at a shared decision around one direction. While many resources offer frameworks for brainstorming, divergence of thinking, and effectively whiteboarding, this is a framework and a method to make decision-making, and tough choices with a team, so that convergence happens.

3. The Cultural Transformation Tools (CTT):  are comprehensive cultural diagnostics and values assessment instruments designed to support leaders in building high-performance, values-driven cultures that attract and keep talented people and collective performance. Giving all voices at the table a chance to be heard, and determining the best ways to work with one another, are critical to team success. It can be easy to assume that the dynamics will work themselves out in the process of working together, but without clear intention, it often leads to missed opportunities, unnecessary misunderstandings, and silent grudges.

6 months, 1 week ago
The Science Behind Being Funny. This Is No Joke.
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Science Of Funniness

People that are studying what makes things funny have come up with some interesting theories:

1. The Superiority Theory: This theory suggest that our humor is derived from the misfortune of others, which makes us feel superior. That certainly explains why a lot of us find it funny when people fall down. Ha! Those inferior people can't even walk properly. That's funny.

2. The Relief Theory: It essentially says that the perception of humor is directly related to the release of built up tension. In other words, we are set up through tension to get to a release point of humor.That release has been shown to actually be good for our health.

3. The Incongruity Theory:This is all about the unexpected. We find humor when something happens that doesn't fit with what we expected to happen.

4. The Kick of the Discovery Theory: This theory is based on some significant research and analysis where over a million people were asked to rank over a thousand jokes.It concludes that humor works by leading us one way and then suddenly shifting our perceptions.

5. The Benign Violations Theory: Lastly, this theory is apparently an attempt by recent researchers to try to find a "unifying theory" of humor. It says that humor comes from a few necessary conditions: First, there needs to be a norm violation. It could be a moral norm, a social norm, or a physical norm. Then there needs to be a safe context where the violation takes place. That gives us permission to laugh at an otherwise not so funny physical violation, for example. No one was hurt in the filming of this joke. Go ahead and laugh your head off.There you go. Now all you need to do is put it all together:

Find a way to show the misfortune of others while concurrently building up the tension of that misfortune. Do it in an unexpected way while violating some sort of norm but in safe place while also leading your audience one way before pulling a 180.

6 months, 1 week ago
Navalism — Quotes & Perceptions by Naval Ravikant – Noah Madden – Medium
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“Information is everywhere but its meaning is created by the observer that interprets it.Meaning is relative and there is no objective, over-arching meaning.”  - Naval Ravikant 
6 months, 2 weeks ago
For a More Creative Brain, Follow These 5 Steps
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The 5 Stages of the Creative Process

The creative process is the act of making new connections between old ideas. Thus, we can say creative thinking is the task of recognizing relationships between conceptsOne way to approach creative challenges is by following the five-step process of:

1. Gather new material. At first, you learn. During this stage you focus on 1) learning specific material directly related to your task and 2) learning general material by becoming fascinated with a wide range of concepts.

2. Thoroughly work over the materials in your mind. During this stage, you examine what you have learned by looking at the facts from different angles and experimenting with fitting various ideas together.

3. Step away from the problem. Next, you put the problem completely out of your mind and go do something else that excites you and energizes you.

4. Let your idea return to you. At some point, but only after you have stopped thinking about it, your idea will come back to you with a flash of insight and renewed energy.

5. Shape and develop your idea based on feedback. For any idea to succeed, you must release it out into the world, submit it to criticism, and adapt it as needed.

[James Webb Young]

6 months, 2 weeks ago
How To Start — When You’ve Procrastinated On Your Goals For Too Long
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“Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday— Don Marquis
6 months, 2 weeks ago
The Secret to Living a Meaningful Life
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When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.

—Eleanor Roosevelt

6 months, 2 weeks ago
1
How to Address Problems Directly Without Being a Jerk
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Addressing problems directly - Tips for confronting problems, not people

1.Don’t make assumptions- Before you confront someone about an issue, make sure you have all the facts.

2. Make sure your conversation serves a purpose  - Whether you’re hoping to solve a conflict or discuss future plans with someone, you should have a tangible goal in mind.

3. Plan out what you’re going to say- When it comes to being direct with someone, wording is everything and bit of consideration goes a long way.

4. Address the phenomenon, not the person - Make it clear you're concerned about the effect and how you can correct it, not criticizing the person.

5. Aim for a positive outcome -Proposing potential solutions is a great way to maintain a constructive mindset; so is actively listening to the other person’s response and compromising where it’s appropriate.

6 months, 2 weeks ago
3
Don't Look for a Great Idea. Look for a Good Problem
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Moving from strategic planning to innovation planning

Management in the 20th century was, in large part, the art of strategic planning. You gathered information about markets, competitors, and other trends and then planned accordingly. Yet today, technology cycles move faster than planning cycles ever could, so we need to take different approach to strategy. Instead of trying to get every move right -which is impossible in today's environment - we need to try to become less wrong over time. Essentially, we need to treat strategy like a role playing game, taking quests that earn us experience and artifacts along the way.That means that we will need to plan differently. In addition to strategic planning, or planning based on things we know or think we know, we need to start innovation planning, or planning based on things we need to learn to solve new and important problems. That's how you quest. You don't plan the journey as much as you prepare for it.

6 months, 2 weeks ago
Invisible asymptotes — Remains of the Day
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infovores
A person who indulges in and desires information gathering and interpretation.

People who are addicted to information. Knowledge hoarders. The term is usually derogatory as information is rarely put into practice.

6 months, 2 weeks ago
1
Self-Evaluation: The Genesis of all Improvement
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Self-Evaluation Mistakes

Emphasizing Perfection vs. Improvement: Most people are so focused on achieving perfection that they lose sight of improvement. When a person or team emphasizes improvement over perfection, progress accelerates. 

Emphasizing Results Over Process: Normal people define success with results. Highly successful people have learned to define success with effort and process. The great Coach Wooden said, "true success is defined with effort, not results." 

Emphasizing Negative Instead of Positive: It's totally normal to want to evaluate what went wrong. But stay focused on what you are doing well, rather than where you are falling short. A focus on the negative will lead to more negative and more under performing. A focus on the positive will promote more positive behavior.

6 months, 2 weeks ago
Empathy doesn’t mean “be nice”
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Different styles of empathy that help us take others’ perspectives more easily
  • Seekers are daring and unafraid to take risks or pivot, gaining new perspectives from their fearless drive to explore and expand.
  • Conveners host conversations. They understand the value an environment plays in creating the right circumstances for perspective taking. It’s all about setting the stage for empathy to emerge.
  • Sages value presence and make an effort to remain in the “now” when working with colleagues, placing both the past and future aside in exchange for connection in the moment.
  • Cultivators see the long game. They’re big-picture people who can look out at the horizon and know where they’re heading. They use this perspective to help others align and orient their actions appropriately.
  • Inquirers ask deep questions. They know how to probe past the superficial and get to the heart of a matter. They gain perspective through inquiry.
  • Confidants listen. They have the patience to truly hear what others have to say and don’t get distracted by a desire to control the conversation. Their listening leads them to connection and understanding.
6 months, 3 weeks ago
The right effort of generosity
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Generosity takes effort

Don't expect much from a drowning man. He's not going to offer you a candy bar or ask how your day was. He's too busy not drowning.

Generosity takes effort. It requires the space to take your mind off your own problems long enough to see someone else's. It requires the confidence to share when a big part of you wants to hoard.

And it requires the emotional labor of empathy.

Generosity begins by trusting ourselves enough to know that we're not actually drowning.

6 months, 3 weeks ago
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8 Keys to Coming Off as the Expert in Whatever You Sell
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The Doctor Mindset

Wanna convince? Don’t think like a salesperson. Don't  jump at any chance to pitch your product or service. 

Instead, adopt a doctor’s mindset.  I’ve never met a doctor who used a pitch like,“We have this incredible new procedure that I just can’t wait to tell you about! It’s going to change everything!” 

Rather, good doctors ask questions to make sure they truly understand your pain before making a diagnosis.

6 months, 3 weeks ago
6
The Curse of Culture – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
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Culture = Leadership

 Culture and leadership closely, we see that they are two sides of the same coin; neither can really be understood by itself. Cultural norms define how a given nation or organizations will define leadership—who will get promoted, who will get the attention of followers.Tt can be argued that the only thing of real importance that leaders do is to create and manage culture; that the unique talent of leaders is their ability to understand and work with culture; and that it is an ultimate act of leadership to destroy culture when it is viewed as dysfunctional.

6 months, 4 weeks ago
2
Radical Efficiency – Rands in Repose
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Receiving feedback - All ideas get better with a diverse set of eyeballs

At the core of the concept of Radical Candor is the idea that the humans you work with and for are uniquely equipped to give you feedback. These are the humans that day in and day out are watching how you treat others, how many you make decisions, and how the results of those decisions play out.

Not only do these humans have a wealth of useful feedback, but they are also distinctly not you. They are each shaped by a different set of experiences that subtly shape their feedback with a healthy bias. Whether this bias increases or decreases the quality of the feedback is a moot point if they never effectively give it to you.

6 months, 4 weeks ago
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29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
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Gen. Stanley McChrystal has said that it is key once you develop a strategic plan to bring in people who are not wedded to it, the outsiders who have no interest in it. They are, as the military term goes, a red team whose job is simple:to find holes and problems in your plan

As a strategist, you can’t have your ego involved—you should be grateful when people expose flaws in your approach. It is why companies need to appoint a Chief Dissent Officer—someone who can ruthlessly kill bad ideas in the making.

7 months ago
1
29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
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Beware of Specialization

If you become too myopic and focused in your scope of work you might lose contact with the bigger picture. It is why Viktor Frankl, author of Man’s Search for Meaning, has put it this way:“I would define a specialist as a man who no longer sees the forest of truth for the trees of facts.”

7 months ago
9 Benefits Of Sharing Best Practices In An Organization
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How Sharing Best Practices Impacts An Organization

- Nurtures A Learning Culture;

- Identifies And Fills Knowledge Gaps;

- Generates Creative And Innovative Ideas;

- Enables Better Decision Making;

- Boosts Efficiency And Competence;

- Constructs A Supportive Corporate Community;

- Provides Employees With An Internal Knowledge Base;

- Reduces The Loss Of Know-How;

- Cuts Down Costs And Time;

7 months ago
The Hughtrain (2018 version) | #hughtrain
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Great branding is a spiritual exercise

The primary job of an advertiser is not to communicate benefit, but to communicate conviction.

Benefit is secondary. Benefit is a product of conviction, not vice versa.

Why is your brand great? Why does your brand matter?

Seriously. If you don’t know, then nobody else can- no advertiser, no buyer, and certainly no customer.

It’s not about merit. It’s about faith. Belief. Conviction. Courage.

It’s about why you’re on this planet. To make a dent in the universe.

8 months ago
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1
International Jazz Day: What jazz improv reveals about creativity in the brain
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Creativity vs Self-Criticism
  • Inhibiting the part of the brain that allows self-criticism -> more creativity (Flow)
  • If you're too self-conscious, it's very hard to be free creatively
  • "Right-brain people" are not more creative. Networks in both the left and right sides of the brain are intimately involved in creativity and change depending on the type of endeavor and the stage of the creative process.
  • What the trained experts who are so creative are always revealing is that it was practice—a lot of effort and practice—that gave them the creative edge, rather than the genius, talent or aptitude they were born with (-> 10,000 hour rule; Daniel Coyle - The Talent Code)
7 months, 1 week ago
3
The Difference Between Open-Minded and Closed-Minded People
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Intelligence and ideas

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

— F. Scott Fitzgerald

7 months, 1 week ago
2
If You Want To Go Fast, Go Alone. If You Want To Go Far, Go Together
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Efficiency Thinking vs. Relational Thinking

The core difference between efficiency and relational thinking is people. In the context of efficiency thinking, other people are a means to an end. In the context of relational thinking; people are the means and the end. This simple distinction has wide-ranging implications.

Efficiency thinking asks, “What are my goals and how can I most rapidly achieve them with the greatest odds of success?” Relational thinking asks, “How can I constantly surround myself with most amazing people and build deep relationships with them?"

7 months, 1 week ago
3
On how to grow an idea – The Creative Independent
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How to grow an idea

Ideas = intersections between ourselves and something else, whether that’s a book, a conversation with a friend, or the subtle suggestion of a tree. Ideas can literally arise out of clouds (if we are looking at them).


"Why is it that when we sit down and try to force an idea, nothing comes—or, if we succeed in forcing it, it feels stale and contrived? Why do the best ideas appear uninvited and at the strangest times, darting out at us like an impish squirrel from a shrub?"

7 months, 1 week ago
3
How to Throw Stuff Away Without Any Regret
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The Declutter Formula
The  best acronym to move past this is using the framework RFASR:
  • Recency — “When was the last time I used this?”
  • Frequency — “How often do I use this?”
  • AcquisitionCost — “How difficult/expensive is it to get this?”
  • StorageCost — “How much space and maintenance cost is it tied to?”
  • RetrieveCost — “What costs are associated with retrieving it or it becoming outdated?”
7 months, 2 weeks ago
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Happiness & the Gorilla | The Daily
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Sweating vs. Watching Others Sweat

The ratio of time you spend sweating to watching others sweat is a forward-looking indicator of your success.

Show me a guy who watches ESPN every night, spends all day Sunday watching football, and doesn’t work out, and I’ll show you a future of anger and failed relationships.

7 months, 3 weeks ago
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Why We Want Things We Don’t Need — And What to Do About It
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The Diderot Effect

Obtaining a new possession often creates a spiral of consumption which leads you to acquire more new things. As a result, we end up buying things that our previous selves never needed to feel happy or fulfilled.

Named after the famous French philosopher Denis Diderot: living in poverty until 52, he purchased  a scarlet robe after selling his library for a small fortune. He noticed how he urged to replace a lot of items to mach his fancy new possession. 

7 months, 3 weeks ago
2
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