What did you learn today?

Deepstash helps you capture & organize the key insights from all online sources! We are a place for lifelong-learners to build their personalized knowledge library.

Don’t have an account? Join the waiting list:
My Stash
Curated by
My Stash
8 followers
CONTENT FROM:
Hierarchy of Agreement | ORGANIZING CREATIVITY
2 insights
Square's Rohini Pandhi on spotting and solving customer problems
2 insights
Quick wins are killing your business – Skyscanner Engineering – Medium
2 insights
The MVP is dead, long life to the MAP. (Minimum Awesome Product)
2 insights
CEO of the Product Revisited
2 insights
Survival of the Mediocre Mediocre
2 insights
I’m Sorry, But Those Are Vanity Metrics
2 insights
No Pain, No Brain Gain: Why Learning Demands (A Little) Discomfort
2 insights
A Reagan Forum with Peter Thiel and Ryan Holiday - 09/24/2018
1 insight
The Most Important Question of Your Life
1 insight
Why Decentralization Matters
1 insight
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
1 insight
Learning how to learn again
1 insight
Stoicism 101 | The Mendocino Humanist
1 insight
What Matters More in Decisions: Analysis or Process?
1 insight
The lies we tell ourselves as designers – UX Collective
1 insight
Selling Your Product While You Build It • Tomasz Tunguz
1 insight
Hit the Mark: Make Complex Ideas Understandable
1 insight
The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work (And How to Fix Them)
1 insight
The Value of Stating the Obvious – Personal Growth – Medium
1 insight
Plotinus - Ancient History Encyclopedia
1 insight
23 Things I Learned About Writing, Strategy And Life From Tim Ferriss
1 insight
Why It’s Better to be Human Than to Be Right – Personal Growth – Medium
1 insight
The short history of global living conditions and why it matters that we know it
1 insight
The 3 R's of Habit Change: How To Start New Habits That Actually Stick
1 insight
Beyond network effects; digging moats in non-networked products
1 insight
The Most Important Rule in UX Design that Everyone Breaks
1 insight
Risk vs Uncertainty — The Untold Truth about Startups and Venture Returns
1 insight
Successful SMB SaaS Companies Have a 2 Step Value Proposition
1 insight
The Three Jobs of Product Management
1 insight
How to Work With Software Engineers - My ten-step plan for working with engineers
1 insight
Daniel Dennett's Most Useful Critical Thinking Tools
1 insight
(61) "It does not make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do. We hire smart people to tell us what to do." Steve Jobs
1 insight
The Customer Retention Starter Kit
1 insight
A CEO Who Can Write – Monday Note
1 insight
Talent management at BlackRock: A conversation with Larry Fink
1 insight
The Problem of Knowledge | Psychology Today
1 insight
How to build a successful movement in 4 steps |
1 insight
UX Indicators — DAY 61 – Roberto Pesce Jr. – Medium
1 insight
How to Throw Stuff Away Without Any Regret
1 insight
Here’s The Technique That Ambitious People Use To Get What They Want
1 insight
Go Fast and Break Things: The Difference Between Reversible and Irreversible Decisions
1 insight
Newton's Laws of Getting Stuff Done Will Help You Boost Your Productivity
1 insight
How to Be More Creative
1 insight
One Metric to Rule them all
1 insight
Say goodbye to the information age: it's all about reputation now
1 insight
Master the Art of Influence — Persuasion as a Skill and Habit
1 insight
The Product Midlife Crisis - DESK Magazine
1 insight
56 INSIGHTs ON: Product Management6Psychology5Communication5Behavioural Analysis4Product Design3Startup3SaaS3Strategy3UX3Learning2Entrepreneurship2Data Analysis2Habits2Knowledge2Metrics2Product Market Fit2Writing2Decision Making2Ideas2AI2Robots2
REARRANGE YOUR INSIGHTS:
Selling Your Product While You Build It • Tomasz Tunguz
Saved in
For SaaS products customers pay you to build the product

"Customers will pay you to build your SaaS product. It’s one of the great advantages of a SaaS model. Annual prepay contracts - wherein customers pay for a year’s cost on day - is a free loan from customers. And every startup can benefit from this advance. There’s only one requirement: you must be able to sell your product while you’re building it." by Tomasz Tunguz

5 days, 22 hours ago
A Reagan Forum with Peter Thiel and Ryan Holiday - 09/24/2018
Saved in
Intellectual Agency

Term coined by Peter Thiel:

"If everybody does the same thing that's the signalling of the lack of agency.  Innovation happens at the borders of society when people start having divergent views. "
2 months, 1 week ago
2
Stoicism 101 | The Mendocino Humanist
Saved in
Stoicism Cheat Sheet
  • In brief: 
  • Accept your fate. 
  • Have nothing you are not prepared to loose
  • Live Simply
  • Exercise self-denial
  • Accept what can not be controlled 
  • Practice missfortune
  • Live in accordance with nature
3 months, 1 week ago
Deepstash
1
How to Be More Creative
Saved in
To be considered creative, something—an idea, a solution, a product, a process—must be both novel and appropriate. In other words, it must be original and useful in some way.
4 months ago
Deepstash
1
Plotinus - Ancient History Encyclopedia
Saved in
Plotinus's Answer to The Problem of Evil

To Plotinus, that which we call 'evil’ is caused by our attachment to the things of this world that prevent our complete devotion to the Divine Mind.Evil, in a sense, is the absence of Good(which for Christians is God). 

This argument made it into Christianity, having a storing influence on St Augustine's view of God. 

4 months, 3 weeks ago
1
23 Things I Learned About Writing, Strategy And Life From Tim Ferriss
Saved in
Treat Everyone Like They Can Put You On The Front Page Of The New York Times

Tim Ferriss'ss network is pretty astounding. His media opportunities are the secret envy of almost every entrepreneur or author. How does he do it? Tim’s strategy is simple:He treats people well. Especially the people that other people ignore. 

His rule was to treat everyone like they could put you on the front page of the New York Times…because someday, you might meet that person. Networking is not about finding someone who can help you right this second. It’s about establishing a relationship that can one day benefit both of you.

5 months, 2 weeks ago
4
The Problem of Knowledge | Psychology Today
Saved in
Knowledge = Justified True Belief

Knowledge as justified true belief is called the tripartite, or three-part, theory of knowledge: 

Belief comes in because you have to believe parts of a knowledge statement. And true, becasue you have to believe them to be true:

For me to know something, say, that Mount Athos is in Greece, it must be the case that (1) I believe that Mount Athos is in Greece, and (2) Mount Athos is actually in Greece. 

Justified means to be based on solid argumentation. 

5 months, 2 weeks ago
3
Risk vs Uncertainty — The Untold Truth about Startups and Venture Returns
Saved in
Risk & Uncertainty
The best things in life aren’t risky, they are unknowable.

Risk and Uncertainty are on different spectrum. 

6 months ago
1
Talent management at BlackRock: A conversation with Larry Fink
Saved in
Diversity of Mind

How many women are in the business? What’s the gender mix? It’s very easy to see if there is a diverse group of men and women with diversity of race. We don’t spend enough time asking: Do we have an organization with diversity of mind? I think this is where most companies fall down.

If you don’t interview a diverse group of people from different universities, different state schools, and different parts in the world, you are not going to get diversity of mind. If you hire all business majors, all engineers, or all people who have one field of expertise, you’re going to fall down.

6 months ago
1
How to Work With Software Engineers - My ten-step plan for working with engineers
Saved in
PdM - Engineers Relationship that Works
  1. Deflect praise
  2. Absorb blame
  3. Sweat the details
  4. Involve them early
  5. Streamline process
  6. Always tell the reasons
  7. Never commit without them
  8. Respect their time
  9. Be specific
  10. Trust them
  11. (And finally…) Always bring the donuts
6 months, 1 week ago
2
The Most Important Question of Your Life
Saved in
Our struggles determine our successes

What we get out of life is not determined by the good feelings we desire but by what bad feelings we’re willing and able to sustain to get us to those good feelings.What determines your success isn’t “What do you want to enjoy?”, but “What pain do you want to sustain?” The quality of your life is not determined by the quality of your positive experiences but the quality of your negative experiences. Because if you want the benefits of something in life, you have to also want the costs. Who you are is defined by the values you are willing to struggle for. This is the most simple and basic component of life: our struggles determine our successes. So choose your struggles wisely.

7 months ago
1
Survival of the Mediocre Mediocre
Saved in
The Lebowski Theorem

No superintelligent AI is going to bother with a task that is harder than hacking its reward function.

This means that an algorithm will cheat (say by exploiting a bug unknown to developers) to reach its winning condition, rather than taking the steps towards excellence that devs designed it for. 

7 months ago
2
The 5 Elements of Effective Thinking
Saved in
5 learnable habits for effective thinking
1.Understand deeply- Don’t face complex issues head-on; first understand simple ideas deeply and be brutally honest about what you know and don’t know
2. Make mistakes - Fail to succeed. Intentionally get it wrong to inevitably get it even more right;
3. Raise questions - Constantly create questions to clarify and extend your understanding;
4. Follow the flow of ideas- Look back to see where ideas came from and then look ahead to discover where those ideas may lead;
5.Change- Change is the universal constant that allows you to get the most out of living and learning.

(Dr. Edward B. Burger and Dr. Michael Starbird)

7 months ago
4
Survival of the Mediocre Mediocre
Saved in
Mediocrity = Deep Laziness (which is positive)

Mediocrity  is an independent meta-trait, not a qualifier you put on some other trait, like intelligence. It is not about being average at one thing, but the ability to be average on any thing. 

It can be seen as the trait that comes closest to evolutionary adaptive “fitness”.  What defines mediocrity is the driving negative intention: to resist the lure of excellence. Sarah Perry calls it deep laziness: 

To be mediocre at something is to be less than excellent at it in order to conserve energy for the indefinitely long haul. 
7 months ago
1
No Pain, No Brain Gain: Why Learning Demands (A Little) Discomfort
Saved in
Feel the burn - learning needs to be effortful to stick

Unfortunately, the trend in many organizations is to design learning to be as easy as possible. Aiming to respect their employees’ busy lives, companies build training programs that can be done at any time, with no prerequisites, and often on a mobile device. The result is fun and easy training programs that employees rave about (making them easier for developers to sell) but don’t actually instill lasting learning.

Worse still, programs like these may lead employers to optimize for misleading metrics, like  maximizing for “likes” or “shares” or high “net promoter scores,” which are easy to earn when programs are fun and fluent but not when they’re demanding. Instead of designing for recall or behavior change, we risk designing for popularity.

The reality is that to be effective, learning needs to be effortful. That’s not to say that anything that makes learning easier is counterproductive–or that all unpleasant learning is effective. The key here is desirable difficulty. The same way you feel a muscle “burn” when it’s being strengthened, the brain needs to feel some discomfort when it’s learning. Your mind might hurt for a while–but that’s a good thing.

7 months ago
1
No Pain, No Brain Gain: Why Learning Demands (A Little) Discomfort
Saved in
WHEN THE GOING GETS TOUGH, IT’S PROBABLY WORKING
When learning is challenging, you have to pay more and better attention to each idea, causing your brain to build stronger connections between neural networks, which embeds the new knowledge for later recall. This adds greater weight to the phrase “pay attention”: You’re not going to have robust recall unless you pay for it with your attention.
7 months ago
2
Square's Rohini Pandhi on spotting and solving customer problems
Saved in
Prioritising features and products

In any given quarter, we ask: what are the biggest metrics we want to shift? It might be increasing revenue. It might be decreasing our loss rates. It might be something around acquisition or engagement metrics.

We then look at what our customers saying. There might be something the sales team is passing along from an enterprise merchant, whereas there might be other feedback I’m getting across all of our customers.

The third bucket is a catch-all for the delightful or strategic pieces. It might not be something that gets prioritized because it will affect a metric or a customer has been asking for it, but it will be a foundational piece for where we want to go in the next few years.

7 months, 1 week ago
Square's Rohini Pandhi on spotting and solving customer problems
Saved in
Written communication in Product Management

"When I joined Intercom, it was much smaller: under 50 people. As we’ve grown, roles have been created, and those roles have turned into teams of people. The challenge has been keeping everybody in sync and communicating. Relying on face-to-face communication just doesn’t scale. That’s where using written communication and having some canonical documents in a project has become super important."

Michelle Fitzpatrick , sr. product manager, Intercom

7 months, 1 week ago
UX Indicators — DAY 61 – Roberto Pesce Jr. – Medium
Saved in
UX KPIs to follow
  • Task success rate (completed tasks / total attempts): focus on measuring the percentage of users that are finishing a given task.
  • Time on task(total time in minutes and seconds): focus on how many time the users take to complete a given task.
  • Use of search vs. navigation (tasks completed by search or navigation/ total tasks completed): focused on understanding the information architecture capability.
  • Easy of use or SUS (http://www.measuringu.com/sus.php): it’s a qualitative scale that helps on understanding the ease of use.
  • Error occurrence rate (total number of occurred errors / total number of errors opportunities): If there is only one error opportunity being analyzed, this is the formula. A form input, for example.
  • Error rate (number of errors / total number of tasks attempts): If there are multiple errors being tracked, this is the formula. Multiple form inputs, for example.
  • Overall satisfaction: This is a qualitative indicator and the data is gathered through surveys, usability testings and interviews.
  • Back-button usage: How many times the back button is used in average. It’s a good understanding of the overall experience and if the users are really being able to go through the website.
  • Conversion rate (visitors who converted / total visitors): How many visitors actually converted a purchase, enrolled to a newsletter, and so on.
  • Number of key user actions per session: Define the key actions and understand if they are being executed by the users.
  • 7 months, 1 week ago
    2
    Daniel Dennett's Most Useful Critical Thinking Tools
    Saved in
    Successful critical comments:

          1. Attempt to re-express your target's position so clearly, vividly, and fairly that your target says, “Thanks, I wish I'd thought of putting it that way.”

          2. List any points of agreement (especially if they are not matters of general or widespread agreement).

          3. Mention anything that you have learnedfrom your target.

          4. Only then are you permitted to say so much as a word ofrebuttal or criticism.

    7 months, 1 week ago
    2
    How to build a successful movement in 4 steps |
    Saved in
    The participation scale
    The most effective crowdbuilders will be those able to move people up the participation scale and sustain and nourish a community over the longer term.
    7 months, 1 week ago
    4
    A CEO Who Can Write – Monday Note
    Saved in
    Writing as a form of Respect

    Bezos is one of the few CEOs who writes to his stakeholders. His annual letters are thoughtful analysis of the business and the principles he and the company use to make decisions.He writes well, affirmatively, with grace (“angels singing”), and not infrequent humor.

    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    3
    Say goodbye to the information age: it's all about reputation now
    Saved in
    Moving from the ‘information age’ towards the ‘reputation age

    There is an underappreciated paradox of knowledge that plays a pivotal role in our advanced hyper-connected liberal democracies: the greater the amount of information that circulates, the more we rely on so-called reputational devices to evaluate it. What makes this paradoxical is that the vastly increased access to information and knowledge we have today does not empower us or make us more cognitively autonomous. Rather, it renders us more dependent on other people’s judgments and evaluations of the information with which we are faced. From the ‘information age’, we are moving towards the ‘reputation age’, in which information will have value only if it is already filtered, evaluated and commented upon by others. Seen in this light, reputation has become a central pillar of collective intelligence today. It is the gatekeeper to knowledge, and the keys to the gate are held by others. The way in which the authority of knowledge is now constructed makes us reliant on what are the inevitably biased judgments of other people, most of whom we do not know.

    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    3
    Newton's Laws of Getting Stuff Done Will Help You Boost Your Productivity
    Saved in
    Newton's laws of motion can be used as an analogy for increasing productivity

    Newton's laws of motion reveal insights that tell you pretty much everything you need to know about how to be productive:

    • Objects in motion tend to stay in motion. Find a way to get started in less than 2 minutes.
    • It's not just about working hard, it's also about working on the right things. You have a limited amount of force and where you apply it matters.
    • Your productivity is a balance of opposing forces. If you want to be more productive, you can either power through the barriers or remove the opposing forces. The second option seems to be less stressful.
    7 months, 1 week ago
    3
    Learning how to learn again
    Saved in
    Copy & handwrite to internalize [Austin Kleon]
    "I copy passages of text that I like longhand in my notebook, and it not only helps me remember the texts, it makes me slow down enough so that I can actually read them and think about them, even internalize them.
    Something happens when I copy texts into my notebook that does not happen when I cut and paste them into Evernote or onto my blog."
    7 months, 1 week ago
    4
    How to Throw Stuff Away Without Any Regret
    Saved in
    The Declutter Formula
    The  best acronym to move past this is using the framework RFASR:
    • Recency — “When was the last time I used this?”
    • Frequency — “How often do I use this?”
    • AcquisitionCost — “How difficult/expensive is it to get this?”
    • StorageCost — “How much space and maintenance cost is it tied to?”
    • RetrieveCost — “What costs are associated with retrieving it or it becoming outdated?”
    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    5
    Hit the Mark: Make Complex Ideas Understandable
    Saved in
    6 ways to make complex ideas understandable to an audience

    1. Diagram: This helps you to display a concept. Think charts, process flows and mind maps;

    2. Deconstruct: dissect your concept  - start small and expand. Try a list, stages or layers;

    3. Compare: Draw similarities or differences to something already known. Try analogies, metaphors and similes;

    4. Picture: Show an image that represents the concepts. Use illustrations, photos or drawings;

    5. Backward map: Start at the end and discuss how you got there - essentially, reverse engineer the process;

    6. Chunk: Group concepts together and explain how they relate. Consider cluster diagrams, tables or charts.

    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    4
    The Value of Stating the Obvious – Personal Growth – Medium
    Saved in
    Stating the obvious is an undersold skill

    There is value in stating the obvious. What is obvious to me is not obvious to others. What seems simple and clear to you is confusing to me. Not stating the obvious is a result of assuming everyone else already sees the point or gets the detail. It implies that we know the minds and thoughts of those around us. Even so, when we state the obvious, we clarify details. We find gaps in our understanding of situations and people.

    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    2
    Go Fast and Break Things: The Difference Between Reversible and Irreversible Decisions
    Saved in
    Reversible vs Irreversible decisions

    Many of the most successful people adopt simple, versatile decision-making heuristics to remove the need for deliberation in particular situations.

    Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com, asks himself, is this a reversible or irreversible decision?

    If a decision is reversible, we can make it fast and without perfect information. If a decision is irreversible, we had better slow down the decision-making process and ensure that we consider ample information and understand the problem as thoroughly as we can.

    Bezos compares decisions to doors. Reversible decisions are doors that open both ways. Irreversible decisions are doors that allow passage in only one direction.

    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    6
    Successful SMB SaaS Companies Have a 2 Step Value Proposition
    Saved in
    SMB SaaS 2 step Value Proposition

    A succesful SMB SaaS product has 2 offers: 

    1. An initial value proposition to the end user  
    2. A longer term value proposition to a manager/decision maker.

    ex: Expensify, which offers simple expense reports to the end user and better compliance with spend policies to the VP of Finance. 

    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    4
    (61) "It does not make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do. We hire smart people to tell us what to do." Steve Jobs
    Saved in
    None

    "It does not make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do. We hire smart people to tell us what to do." 

    Steve Jobs

    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    4
    The Customer Retention Starter Kit
    Saved in
    Retention
    “Retention is like teenage sex. Everyone says they are doing it, but nobody is doing it well.” - Casey Winters
    7 months, 2 weeks ago
    2
    Why It’s Better to be Human Than to Be Right – Personal Growth – Medium
    Saved in
    The benefits of Being Wrong

    • You accept your vulnerability;

    • You embrace a learning mind;

    • You open new possibilities;

    • You prioritize self-growth over your reputation;

    • You don’t need to prove anything.

    We default to being right all the time. Realizing that we can be wrong takes practice. It’s an ability that needs to be nurtured. It starts by acknowledging that we are human.

    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    5
    The 3 R's of Habit Change: How To Start New Habits That Actually Stick
    Saved in
    The 3 R’s of Habit Change

    Every habit you have — good or bad — follows the same 3–step pattern.

    1. Reminder (the trigger that initiates the behavior)
    2. Routine (the behavior itself; the action you take)
    3. Reward (the benefit you gain from doing the behavior)
    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    4
    Beyond network effects; digging moats in non-networked products
    Saved in
    Increasing product stickiness

    Non-network Switching Cost

    Switching costs is the one-time inconvenience or expense a user incurs to change over from one product to another. The strongest form of switching cost comes from network dynamics — other users being on a platform. But even in non-networked products, there are several forms of switching costs:

    • Personal data. Some products are architected in a way where users build data within the product over time. Data has gravity and the more data a user generates within a product, the harder it will be for the user to switch. Strava (ignoring the social functionality) is an example of this phenomenon. After having used Strava for several years, switching to a new fitness app would mean orphaning my fitness history.
    • Habit.Products that are used with high frequency tend to exhibit habit formation and once habit is formed, users are reluctant to switch. For instance, there is a shockingly small percentage of users that switch from either iOS to Android or vice-versa when they get a new phone, in part because users habituate to navigating a particular operating system. Because of user preference for the status quo, to replace a habitual product a new entrant must be vastly, perhaps even an order of magnitude, better, which translates to a moat.
    • Embedding.This is a phenomenon whereby a product becomes integrated with a user’s other products and workflow. This type of moat is most often seen in enterprise software products; many enterprise software giants get their defensibility from high switching costs. Arguably the large cloud platforms like AWS and Microsoft Azure have embedding lock in. But embedding can work in consumer products as well. For instance, consumer finance products often exhibit embedding since users connect their bank accounts and payments cards to other applications.
    7 months, 3 weeks ago
    3
    The lies we tell ourselves as designers – UX Collective
    Saved in
    Lies designers say.

    What we say:
    “What we’re showing here is just a high-level overview of what we’ve been exploring in the last two weeks, of course this will keep evolving.”

    What we mean:
    “We were not brave enough to make any decisions and/or to clearly state them on a slide. And although we had two weeks we were not thorough enough to finalize what we started. So we’ll just do a whole presentation avoiding strong point of views that could hurt our relationship in case you disagree with what we’re saying.”

    What ends up happening:
    The work gets pushed two extra weeks.

    7 months, 4 weeks ago
    3
    The short history of global living conditions and why it matters that we know it
    Saved in
    Freedom is impossible without faith in free people. And if we are not aware of our history and falsely believe the opposite of what is true we risk losing faith in each other.
    8 months ago
    2
    The Product Midlife Crisis - DESK Magazine
    Saved in
    Should my product have an opinion?

    If yes, what's that opinion and who is my product if it would be a person?

    If yes, the goal shouldn't be to appeal to many, but only appeal to those who shared your opinion. This has huge value in terms of decision making, as Basecamp (formerly 37signals) knows:

    “When you don’t know what you believe, everything becomes an argument. Everything is debatable. But when you stand for something, decisions are obvious.”

    ― Jason Fried

    7 months, 4 weeks ago
    2
    Here’s The Technique That Ambitious People Use To Get What They Want
    Saved in
    Audition not Interview

    There is the type who expects to be asked a number of questions from management. And then there is the type who expects not only to do most of the asking, but to put on a presentation.

    It is the first type that sees the situation as an interview, and it is the second who sees it not as an interview, but as an audition.

    8 months ago
    4
    Hierarchy of Agreement | ORGANIZING CREATIVITY
    Saved in
    Hierarchy of Agreement

     “Agreeing well” is as important as “disagreeing well”. Paul Graham proposed a hierarchy of disagreement, and his method can be used to create the opposite pyramid: 

    • AH0: Unspecific Praise (was: name calling). The lowest level is unspecific praise,, like "I love it". 
    • AH1: Personal Praise (was: ad hominem). "You know what you are talking about".Useless. 
    • AH2: Praising the Tone (was: Responding to Tone) "I love your writing" ... But beautiful writing does not equal true writing.
    • AH3: Agreement with Arguments (was: Contradiction).  It repeats the arguments for others to hear and gives the author feedback on which arguments are effective
    • AH4: Add to Arguments (was: Counterargument). Perhaps it’s something the author did not see, or did not deem important enough to mention because it might be peripheral.
    • H5: Qualitative Improvement (was: Refutation). Addresses imperfections and removes contradictions. 
    • AH6: Improving the Central Point (was: Refuting the Central Point)
    8 months, 2 weeks ago
    4
    What Matters More in Decisions: Analysis or Process?
    Saved in
    Analysis & Decision Making

    Research showed that most business decisions were not made on “gut calls” but rather rigorous analysis. And yet they were poor decisions. 

    “Our research indicates that, contrary to what one might assume, good analysis in the hands of managers who have good judgment won’t naturally yield good decisions.”

    Charlie Munger, explained the reason:

    [Projections] are put together by people who have an interest in a particular outcome, have a subconscious bias, and its apparent precision makes it fallacious. 

    8 months ago
    Deepstash
    2
    Quick wins are killing your business – Skyscanner Engineering – Medium
    Saved in
    Quick wins vs responsability
    Quick wins give people a way of leaving a meeting room with a minimum amount of responsibility.
    8 months, 1 week ago
    1
    Quick wins are killing your business – Skyscanner Engineering – Medium
    Saved in
    Quick wins
    Quick wins don’t make you a market leader, just a follower. Quick wins just prolong you solving the hard problems that if left unsolved, will lead to your business being disrupted, or never growing at all.
    8 months, 1 week ago
    CEO of the Product Revisited
    Saved in
    CEO vs PdM
    In an early stage startup, all of the above work is still necessary, but it’s almost always a co-founder, often the actual CEO, that does this. So in that case the same person is CEO of the company, and CEO of the product.
    8 months, 1 week ago
    CEO of the Product Revisited
    Saved in
    Role of PdM
    I want [product managers] to be ambitious, and hungry, and I want them to be confident enough in their abilities to take responsibility for decisions, and I want them to understand they need to worry about all aspects of the business, but I also believe strongly in the importance of humility for a product manager, and I need to make sure they’re not thinking the title gives them anything beyond a shot at earning the respect of their team.
    8 months, 1 week ago
    1
    Hierarchy of Agreement | ORGANIZING CREATIVITY
    Saved in
    “I liked it” is nice feedback — but not good feedback.
    8 months, 2 weeks ago
    3
    Master the Art of Influence — Persuasion as a Skill and Habit
    Saved in
    System 1 and 2 thinking
    • System I is the part of the brain that handles the simple things: sensory input, automatic and unimportant decisions (i.e. I’m going to reach for my drink), casual social interactions, and other inbound signals that can be processed rapidly and rather easily.
    • System II is the higher-order, logical part of the brain. “It’s the part that thinks at the speed of the voice in your head,” he says. It brings processing power to bear on decisions and problems that require deeper thought.
    8 months, 2 weeks ago
    2
    The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work (And How to Fix Them)
    Saved in
    3 Stages of Failure

    One of the hardest things in life is to know when to keep going and when to move on.  challenges into three stages of failure:

    1. Stage 1 is a Failure of Tactics. These are HOW mistakes. They occur when you fail to build robust systems, forget to measure carefully, and getlazy with the details. A Failure of Tactics is a failure to execute on a good plan and a clear vision.
    2. Stage 2 is a Failure of Strategy. These are WHAT mistakes. They occur when you follow a strategy that fails to deliver the results you want. You can know whyyou do the things you do and you can know how to do the work, but still choose the wrong what to make it happen.
    3. Stage 3 is a Failure of Vision. These are WHY mistakes. They occur when you don’t set a clear direction for yourself, follow a vision that doesn’t fulfill you, or otherwise fail to understand why you do the things you do.
    8 months, 2 weeks ago
    6
    The MVP is dead, long life to the MAP. (Minimum Awesome Product)
    Saved in
    MAP: Minimum Awesome Product

    It is hard to compete in 2018 with a mediocre product when your competitors have apps with several years of advantage, especially design. What worked as viable a few years ago may not work today.

    If you’re going to make a new product, think about what your customers expect and try to provide the best experience and product possible.

    9 months, 3 weeks ago
    6
    Why Decentralization Matters
    Saved in
    The Lifecycle of Centralized Platforms

    When they start out, they do everything they can to recruit users and 3rd-party complements like developers, businesses, and media organizations. They do this to make their services more valuable, as platforms (by definition) are systems with multi-sided network effects. As platforms move up the adoption S-curve, their power over users and 3rd parties steadily grows.

    When they hit the top of the S-curve, their relationships with network participants change from positive-sum to zero-sum. The easiest way to continue growing lies in extracting data from users and competing with complements over audiences and profits. Historical examples of this are Microsoft vs Netscape, Google vs Yelp, Facebook vs Zynga, and Twitter vs its 3rd-party clients.

    9 months, 2 weeks ago
    1
    The MVP is dead, long life to the MAP. (Minimum Awesome Product)
    Saved in
    Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

    MVP allows us to launch the product with the least amount of features possible so that we can learn and extract relevant information from this trial period and user interaction through a series of metrics and then act based on that data.

    The approach is best illustrated by Kniberg's picture:

    • Do you want to make a car? The traditional method: First a wheel, then another, then another, then the engine, etc…Is there a problem? It will take too long to create the car we want.
    • MVP Way? First make a skate, then a bicycle, then a motorcycle and then we end up with the car.
    9 months, 3 weeks ago
    2
    The Most Important Rule in UX Design that Everyone Breaks
    Saved in
    Miller’s Law

    Refers to the capacity for keeping ~7 bits of information ‘in the head’ short term. Millers paper title "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information" suggests that the number of perceptual ‘chunks’ an average human can hold in working memory (a component of short-term memory) is 7 ± 2.

    Miller's Law had implication in chunking. Chunking is a critical element of information organization, and is the basis for our UX and organizational rule.

    It teaches us that humans have a finite amount of information they can process, and that information overload will lead to distraction that negatively affects performance. Companies should look for ways to organize information in a way that is much more digestible for their customers and employees. This could be by eliminating tools or applications that are producing cognitive overload, reducing the amount of members on a team, or even organizing your departments based on our knowledge of working memory.

    9 months, 3 weeks ago
    2
    One Metric to Rule them all
    Saved in
    Why Revenue is not a Good Product Metric

    It is too disconnected from the product and too little in your control to be a great metric:

    • Discounted deals & other social engineering tricks makes the metric untrustworthy
    • Usually it ends up with sales and marketing running the roadmap
    • Kills innovation by making the team focus on short term deals
    9 months, 4 weeks ago
    2
    The Three Jobs of Product Management
    Saved in
    The 3 key jobs of Product Managers

    Product Managers are usually spending their time in 3 (core) areas:

    • Business Owner: track competition, discover best practices, understand buyers and users, handle partners, develop and/or manage an acquisition strategy and much much more.
    • Vision Holder: The vision can come from the general manager or the team itself. But the PM has to insure the team knows what they are trying to accomplish and why.
    • Team Coordinator. A job similar to a project manager,ensuring everyone knows what’s going on, what’s expected, what the schedule is.

    As the the team or the product matures the PdM will spend more time in certain areas and less in others.

    9 months, 4 weeks ago
    1
    I’m Sorry, But Those Are Vanity Metrics
    Saved in
    Clarity Metrics for Software-based Companies

    The number of users, while a critical selling point for investors, partners and advisors, is a vanity metric. Active engagement is a better metric. When you get a new client you need to know whether they were actually using the software. And talk to any outlier when you find one. Ask:

    • How are they feeling using the software?
    • Why are they are not using it? Is there something wrong?
    • Are they stuck?

    Another way to zero in on active engagement is by mitigating what keeps users from using your product:

    • A failure rate is the number of times your company is unable to deliver on its promise.
    • Poison rates, a subset of the above, are when customers have such a terrible first experience that they don’t return

    9 months, 3 weeks ago
    2
    I’m Sorry, But Those Are Vanity Metrics
    Saved in
    Event streams for Behaviour Tracking

    Siloed data will disguise real metrics. “First, centralize user activities and milestones into a single data stream. Event streams show how people move through your product and allow you to analyze their behavior,” says Lloyd Tabb, the founder of Looker.

    Answer these questions to start creating your event stream:

    • When did the user sign up for our product/service?
    • Have they made a purchase?
    • How many active minutes do they spend with us?
    • Where do they spend the most time? Where do they spend the least? What proxies predict this behavior?
    • How does their behavior change over time?
    • When or where do they stop using our product?
    After creating the stream, Tabb recommends counting the number of active five-minute blocks your user spent with you in a day and look for clusters of action — and gaps of inaction — in their behavior.

    9 months, 3 weeks ago
    2
    Organize your knowledge ... with a Deepstash account
    Collect insights from all over the web & save them for your next project.
    Have an account?