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Self Improvement

99 SAVED IDEAS

biographer Sally Bedell Smith
"By the ’80s, he [Prince Philip] had written nine books. He was the first person in the royal family to use television. He did a television documentary. He persuaded the Queen in 1957 to televise her annual Christmas message. And he even taught her how to use a teleprompter. He was the first member of the royal family to use a computer … He picked up the phone, but also wrote all his own emails. He wrote his speeches. He was a man of searching intellect, great curiosity."

@laylag14

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Self Improvement

Prince Philip's Start In Life

Born on the Greek island of Corfu in June 1921, Philip was the great-great-grandson of Queen Victoria and nephew of Constantine I of Greece, whose 1922 abdication forced the young infant and his family to flee their home country. 

Philip spent stretches of time in France, England and Germany, and was notably scarred by tragedies, including the institutionalization of his mother and death of his beloved older sister in a plane crash.

Meeting The Future Queen
  • Philip and Elizabeth first met in 1934, when he was 13 and she was 8.
  • Five years later, the pair crossed paths again: As Elizabeth’s cousin recalled in her autobiography, the princess “was truly in love from the very beginning.”
  • The couple wed in 1947, embarking on a 74-year partnership that would cement Philip’s status as the United Kingdom’s longest-serving royal consort.
Broadcasting The Coronation Of The Queen
  • A commission chaired by Prince Philip proposed broadcasting the 1953 investiture ceremony that formally named Elizabeth II as queen on live television.
  • Even if Prime Minister Winston Churchill expressed clear disapproval, the queen came around to the idea, allowing the broadcast of all but one segment of the coronation.
  • More than 20 million people tuned in to the televised ceremony.

The years after the coronation of Queen Elisabeth II the royals continued to embrace television as a way of connecting with the British people:

  • In 1957, the queen delivered her annual Christmas address during a live broadcast.
  • Four years later, in 1961, Philip became the first family member to sit for a television interview.
  • Toward the end of the decade, the Windsors even invited cameras into their home, offering the BBC the opportunity to film a behind-the-scenes documentary.

Much of this push for transparency can be traced back to Prince Philip, whose unconventional upbringing inspired him to modernize the monarchy.

  • The BBC began filming its “Royal Family” documentary in June 1968. Philip oversaw the process and sought to ensure the royals were presented in a humanizing light.
  • Though the documentary has strong viewership, Buckingham Palace decided to stop its broadcast without the queen’s permission, because it revealed the royals to be a pretty normal British upper-class family - the monarchy began to lose the aura of grandeur that distance conveyed.
  • Over the following decades, as the royal couple’s children navigated much-publicized divorces, this sense of demystification was exacerbated even more.
  • Prince Philip also faced criticism and continued to make headlines for his offensive comments, many of which played on racial stereotypes, and brought much unwanted attention to the royal family.
Prince Philip
'Being married to the queen, it seemed to me, my first duty was to serve her in the best way I could.''
Queen Elizabeth II
“He is someone who doesn’t take easily to compliments but he has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years, and I … owe him a debt greater than he would ever claim or we shall ever know.”
Wilhelm Wundt
  • He was the first founder of the psychology laboratory at the University of Leipzig which marked the official beginning of psychology as an independent science;
  • Has many beliefs and theories but was heavily misunderstood by some due to the language barrier. His student, Edward Bradford Titchener propagated many misconceptions about his works.
William James
  • He earned his medical degree at Harvard University back in 1869 but never practiced medicine;
  • He taught at Harvard in 1873 for physiology and was the first to offer the course "physiological psychology";
  • He is popularly known for his number of theories such as: theory of the self, the James-Lange theory of emotion, pragmatic theory of truth, and the two-stage model of free will;
  • Also contributed significantly to the philosophy of religion
Edward Thorndike
  • Recognized for his contributions in psychometrics;
  • His work was focused on the development of the field of educational psychology - this is the branch that focuses on studying how people take in knowledge in order to further develop educational materials and approaches for teaching;
  • He is also known for his puzzle box experiments with animals.
Sigmund Freud
  • He is well-known as the "father of psychoanalytic theory";
  • He has contributed tremendously to psychoanalysis in the late 1890s because of his deep-rooted fascination to the study of the mind;
  • Due to the increasing number of his following in the early 1900s, it resulted to the meeting of the first International Psychoanalytic Congress in 1908.
B.F. Skinner
  • Burrhus Frederic Skinner is known for his work on operant conditioning - it is a form of behavior modification that helps elaborate and alter certain behaviors.
  • He is also famously known for his experimentation using a condition chamber or commonly known as the "Skinner Box". The Skinner Box led to the formation of theories about ideal reward reinforcement schedules.
Mary Whiton Calkins
  • Widely known for her research about the self;
  • She understood the importance of self-psychology and that it should be a part of scientific research;
  • Despite her contribution to Harvard, the university did not confer degrees to women during that time;
  • She has published four books and more than 100 articles in psychology and philosophy;
  • She was also elected president of the APA and she also established her own psychology lab in the United States.
Alfred Binet
  • He was a French psychologist who partially contributed to the formation of IQ test - the objective measurement for intelligence;
  • He studied physiology after getting his law degree in 1878, then worked at a neurological clinic in Paris in 1880s, then pursued a long term career in research and became a director of the Sorbonne; and
  • Has published over 200 books and articles on diverse subject matters;
Ivan Pavlov
  • In contrast to what people think, Pavlov was a Russian physiologist who quit priesthood to pursue science;
  • Famously known for his theory of classical conditioning - where an external stimuli can have direct influence in a behavioral response;
  • He won a Nobel prize for his work.
Harry Harlow
  • He studied the behavior of monkeys in a laboratory environment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison;
  • His researched proved his hypothesis that "human infants needed similar contact from their mothers" correct when baby monkeys showed that they needed more than mere sustenance to thrive. They needed contact comfort.
  • His contribution continues to be an influential breakthrough in parenting styles up to date.
Theories on how the Moon formed

Before the Apollo mission research, there were three theories about how the Moon formed.

  1. Capture theory suggests that the Moon was a wandering body that was captured by Earth's gravity as it passed nearby.
  2. Accretion theory suggests that the Moon was created along with Earth at its formation.
  3. The fission scenario proposes that the Earth spun so fast that some material broke away and began to orbit the planet.

Today, the giant-impact theory is widely accepted. It proposes that Earth and a small planet collided. The debris from this impact collected in orbit around Earth to form the Moon.

The Apollo mission brought back rock and soil from the Moon. It showed that the Earth and Moon share chemical and isotopic similarities, suggesting a linked history.

The minerals on the Moon contain less water than similar terrestrial rocks. The Moon has material that forms quickly at a high temperature.

The giant-impact model suggests that, in the Earth's early history, the proto-Earth and Theia (a Mars-sized planet) collided and reformed as one body. A small part of the new mass spun off to become the Moon.

Some suggest that early Earth and Theia came from the same neighbourhood as the solar system was forming and were made of similar materials.

If you look at the lunar surface, it seems pale grey with dark splodges.

The pale grey is a rock named anorthosite. It forms as molten rock cools down. The dark areas are another rock type called basalt. Basalt is the most common surface on all inner planets in our solar system and can be found on the ocean floor.

How Fashion Trends Start

For decades, fashion trends typically were started through the method of fashion house to magazine to consumer.

In our current Internet world, things have changed. Fashion houses still impact the way fashion trends start, but other sources also play a role. Fashion trends now evolve through five key ways: From the runway, through street style, celebrities, fashion bloggers, and different fashion capitals globally.

Runway Trends

Many of the current trends are inspired by the looks that designers send down the runways each season during Fashion Week events in New York, Milan, and Paris.

One reason runways inspire trends is that runway looks are moments created by fashion designers that are fantastical. People wait for many of the pieces in anticipation because they are typically over-the-top designs that look like they came from a dream.

Celebrities are the biggest driving force in trend creation.

Companies often turn to celebrities to be spokespeople for their brands and products because celebrities are highly influential. They have a huge fan base and consequently a bigger reach than the latest fashion magazine.

Fashion trends vary all over the world. People often look out of their geographic area to trend-source for a unique newness.

Trends from fashion capitals of the world - New York City, Paris, Milan, and London - are seen through a different set of eyes that enable fashion lovers to bring something new to their world.

Street style refers to everyday looks seen on the streets. These looks make an impact on the people who pass them by.

Reasons street style inspires trends:

  • The looks are usually easier to recreate.
  • People are inclined to follow the trend of an 'everyday person' because they think they can easily pull it off themselves.

Fashion bloggers have proven to the masses that they have great taste. They are the creators of fashion trends, not followers. They offer a fresh perspective on the fashion industry that is loved and respected by their readers.

Designers turn to fashion bloggers to help promote their products. Fashion bloggers set trends by styling the garments in various ways, photographing themselves and sharing the images to their large audiences.

  • Less is More.
  • Eliminate the Unessential.
  • Live in the Moment.
  • Organize your time and set meaningless activites aside.
  • Purpose: have a direction, to discover your passion and pursue it, to define your goals, dreams, and desires.
  • Individualism. Grow as an individual, take your own decisions, follow your path, choose for yourself and don’t try to answer other people’s expectations.

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