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Self Improvement

95 SAVED IDEAS

Good trips come and go. Bad trips are remembered.

A journey is more memorable if it doesn't go according to plan. Some trips only have a few unplanned events, such as a missed connection or a rained-out parade.

Other trips turn into adventure literature, such as the 1910 Terra Nova expedition to Antarctica, "The Worst Journey in the World."

@kieronl

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Self Improvement

Social scientists found that we're not very good at predicting what will and will not make us happy. We think more stuff will make us happy, but research shows that experiences bring the greatest pleasure.

We assume the perfect journey will make us happy, but unexpected twists make the trip memorable.

We travel to stretch our abilities, to test ourselves. Bad trips help us to become the hero of the journey.

The steps in a hero story are always the same. The hero starts a journey, is tested, passes the test, and finally returns home transformed.

Bad events make deeper impressions than good ones. Over time, we forget the bad stuff in it and remember the good - known as the "fading affect bias." Researchers show that we will remember the positive ones with heightened emotions in them.

When we retell a tale, our minds revise it. With each retelling, it gets bigger. You don't just say the fish you caught was the size of a small car, you believe it because you remember it that way.

Eckhart Tolle
“Whatever the present moment contains, accept it as if you had chosen it."

A mindset hack is to expect nothing, and don’t think of anything that is happening as good or bad. Accept things as they happen, as if that is what was planned, letting you move in the particular landscape in a mindful way.

This simple hack makes us less unhappy and less disappointed all the time.

Imagine a good thing that happened to you recently and a bad thing. Just imagine those recent incidents as just events, not good or bad in any way. When we stop judging, we are not burdened with emotions, and not chained to the world. Nothing is really good or bad, but in reality, is just our interpretation and perception.

Even big events are events that just happened. Festivals and wars keep happening. Death is always happening everywhere, let it be.

  • We feel angry, frustrated or sad with our friends, loved ones and family members because they don’t live up to our expectations.
  • If we don’t have any expectations in the first place, we would not judge them accordingly, and their actions or non-actions will not cause emotional reactions inside us.
  • If we travel somewhere with great expectations, we are bound to be disappointed. If we just go somewhere without any expectations, we may be delighted and would enjoy whatever experience comes forth.

We need to stop judging and expecting because it stops our factual understanding. We have already come to a conclusion, our preferred way of something to be, and reality is bound to be different.

Expecting and judging will make us unhappy as reality is never what we expect it to be. We need to stop killing our happiness and start to live our lives instead.

  1. Become more aware during the day, noticing more things around you.
  2. Every time a judgement or expectation is made, just note down the moment and repeat this: No expectations, no good or bad.
  3. Be curious as to why people behave or act in a certain way, removing your coloured glasses behind.
  4. Take whatever comes in your life and experience it. You can only control your responses.
  5. Accept circumstances and people as they are.
  6. Understand that the present moment is a gift, containing infinite possibilities.
Facts About Plate Tectonics
  • The theory that states that the Earth's "outer shell" is split into huge slabs of rock we call "plates," glide over the Earth's mantle is known as the Plate Tectonics
  • Alfred Wegener proposed this theory back in 1915 when it was still named the continental drift
  • Before plate tectonics, the continental drift theory was used to explain the geologic features of a region, which eventually became the unifying theory of geology.
  • Like a pot boiling on a stove, the driving force behind plate tectonics is the convection in the mantle where the hot material near the Earth's core rises while the colder materials sink.
  • The geologists see it differently though. They believe it's more of a "repeated collision" and call it plate boundaries. The three types of plate boundaries are: Convergent, Divergent, Transform.
  • These tectonic plates move at a rate of 1-2 inches per year.

There are seven major plates that currently exist:

  1. North American
  2. Pacific
  3. Eurasian
  4. African
  5. Indo-Australian
  6. South American
  7. Antarctic

Although, evidence has been found that the Indo-Australian plate has cracked therefore making the total existing plates to 8.

The earliest evidence of the tectonic plates was found in Greenland which was estimated to be abbout 3.8 billion years old. Covnersely, researchers have found that the tectonic plates have been active for as long as 4 billion years ago.

There have been two supercontinents: The Rodinia which happened a billion years ago while the most recent one The Pangea formed about 300 million years ago.

The Library of Ashurbanipal
  • In the mid-19th century, archaeologists found the ruins of the world's oldest known library in Nineveh (modern-day Iraq).
  • It dates back to the 7th century B.C and includes 30,000 cuneiform tablets, mostly containing archival documents, religious incantations and scholarly texts.
  • The Assyrian ruler Ashurbanipal compiled much of his library by looting works from Babylonia and other territories he conquered. The majority of its contents are now kept in the British Museum in London.
The Library of Alexandria
  • The ancient world's intellectual jewel was established by general Ptolemy I Soter after Alexander the Great's death in 323 B.C.
  • At its peak, it may have included over 500,000 papyrus scrolls containing works of literature and texts on history, law, mathematics, and science.
  • The library was supposedly burned in 48 B.C. after Julius Caesar accidentally set fire to Alexandria's harbour during a battle against the Egyptian ruler Ptolemy XIII.
  • However, most historians believe that it only came to an end in 270 A.D. during the reign of the Roman emperor Aurelian, while others believe it occurred during the fourth century.
The Library of Pergamum
  • The Library of Pergamum was constructed in the third century B.C. by members of the Attalid dynasty in modern-day Turkey.
  • It was housed in a temple complex devoted to Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom.
  • The ancient chronicler Pliny the Elder said the Library of Pergamum became so famous that it was considered to be in "keen competition" with the Library of Alexandria.
The Villa of the Papyri
  • The collection of the "Villa of the Papyri" is the only collection to survive to the present day.
  • About 1,800 scrolls were located in the Roman city of Herculaneum.
  • When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D., the library was buried - and preserved - under 90-foot of volcanic material. It was rediscovered in the 18th century.
  • The library contains several texts by an Epicurean philosopher and poet named Philodemus.
The Libraries of Trajan’s Forum
  • Around 112 A.D. the multi-use building complex was completed by Emperor Trajan in the city of Rome.
  • It consisted of plazas, markets, and religious temples as well as a library.
  • Two separate structures housed the library, one for works in Latin, and one for works in Greek and each included large central reading chambers and two levels of bookshelf-lined alcoves containing about 20,000 scrolls.
The Library of Celsus
  • Around 120 A.D. the son of the Roman consul Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus completed a memorial library to his father in Ephesus (modern-day Turkey).
  • The building featured four statues representing Wisdom, Virtue, Intelligence, and Knowledge.
  • The library may have held some 12,000 scrolls.
  • Celsus himself was buried inside it in an ornamental sarcophagus.
The Imperial Library of Constantinople
  • The library was built in the fourth century A.D. under Constantine the Great but stayed small until the fifth century.
  • The collection increased to 120,000 scrolls and codices.
  • The Imperial Library size continued to increase and shrink over the following centuries due to neglect and frequent fires.
  • A Crusader army finally sacked Constantinople in 1204, but the scribes and scholars preserved countless ancient Greek and Roman literature pieces by making parchment copies.
The House of Wisdom
  • Baghdad (the Iraqi city) was once one of the world's centres of learning and culture.
  • The House of Wisdom was established in the ninth century A.D. during the reign of the Abbasids.
  • The library was stocked with Persian, Indian, and Greek manuscripts on mathematics, astronomy, science, medicine, and philosophy.
  • In 1258, the House of Wisdom came to ruin when the Mongols sacked Baghdad. According to legend, so many books were thrown into the River Tigris that its waters turned black from ink.
Tactical Laziness

Laziness or Sloth is the disinclination to use energy and is seen as a negative trait in most cultures. Being lazy has also been associated with being a slacker, or a good-for-nothing person wasting time.

New scientific research tells a completely different story and lists out many advantages of being a couch potato. Being tactically lazy can actually be good for us.

"Progress isn’t made by early risers. It’s made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something".

Humans may be seeing laziness upside down, as it may not really be a sign of inefficiency or unproductivity, but a result of being able to work smartly and free up time to do nothing. Sitting lazily can also trigger further smart work.

  1. Many smart solutions like the remote control, smart speakers, escalators and even the light switch are the work of lazy people.
  2. Lazy people often actively procrastinate, and unlike the ‘passive’ procrastinators, they have better control over their work and time and perform well under pressure.
  3. As lazy people see their energy as an expenditure that can be saved like time or money, they avoid unnecessary, low-output tasks, and prefer high-leverage tasks.
  4. Lazy people are the pioneers of automating, delegating or eliminating monotonous and time-consuming tasks.
  1. Slacking is good for our mental health, as being distracted and busy blocks our thoughts and feelings, leading to suppression of truth, and many mental ailments can arise from avoiding our real thoughts.
  2. Resting and staying idle recharges our ‘energy stores’ just like a daytime nap refreshes us. Breaks are good for the body.
  1. Many problems just need time to be auto-solved, and taking action may be detrimental to them. Lazy people often wait out and let the problem die on their own.
  2. Being lazy may be an indication of a lack of motivation, lethargy, tiredness, hunger or a change that may be required on what we do with our lives.

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