🍎

Health

66 SAVED IDEAS

We don't sleep when we should

Many people live like shift workers to some degree. The majority of people either go to bed after midnight or wake up early without getting enough sleep.

Shift work is a probable carcinogen, according to the WHO. Moreover, there is a list of health problems associated with shift work. The reason is that shift work interferes with your circadian rhythm. Humans are diurnal - we are designed to be awake in the day and asleep at night. While we can be nocturnal, we weren't built for it long term.

@ame_dww82

🍎

Health

Every cell and organ in your body has a clock. If things are working right, they are in sync with your brain. But if things aren't in sync, your hormones are out of whack, causing problems with your energy levels, hunger, stress and overall health.

The most important factor to your circadian rhythm is light. We have complete control over the amount of light we're exposed to. This essentially makes us shift workers. If we want to fix this, we have to focus on what we do at night.

Light at night means less melatonin - which means poor sleep and a foggy brain the next day. Blue light sends a powerful signal to your brain that it is daytime, but it's not the only problem. All light is a problem. After dark, all light should be reduced, with as little light as possible after 8 PM.

While we probably won't sit around during the evening in the dark, we can reduce overhead lighting and reduce the blue light on your screens.

Eating signals to your body it's daytime.

People who eat in an 8 - 11 hour window and stop eating 3 hours before bed are healthier and are better able to pay attention the next day.

You need around seven hours of sleep a night. Children need more, and older folks less. Sleeping much more or notably less than seven hours is associated with a shorter lifespan.

Consistency is as important. You need a regular schedule for when you wake up, when you have your first and last meal, when you dim the lights and when you go to bed. If any of these factors shift by two hours over a week, it's an issue.

As soon as you wake up, go outside and get sunlight onto your eyes. (Don't stare directly into the sun.)

Your retinas get more sensitive as the day goes on, and they are less sensitive in the morning. You need to spend about 2 - 10 minutes outside, depending on how bright it is. Getting some sunlight will set your internal clock properly.

  • Your brain will be most alert between 10 AM and 3 PM. That is when your best work or learning is done.
  • If you still don't feel awake, you may need even more early sunlight. You need at least 1 hour of daylight exposure outside to reduce sleepiness and stay happy and productive throughout the day.
  • If you still feel tired throughout the day, 150 minutes of moderate activity a week can affect how well you sleep and how energetic you feel the next day.
The traditional definition of burnout

Burnout can be defined as a combination of exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficiency. People who feel burned out may experience a lack of emotional energy to attend to their work, withdraw from colleagues and customers, and may feel incompetent as a result.

But not everyone experiences burnout in the same way. A better framework can help to understand the many subtypes of burnout.

  • The frenetic worker. Despite feeling overloaded and overwhelmed with work, you work increasingly harder, ignoring your own needs to the point of exhaustion.
  • The under-challenged worker. You have to cope with monotonous conditions that fail to provide satisfaction. You feel that your work lacks opportunities to develop your abilities.
  • The worn-out worker. You are mentally, physically, and emotionally exhausted. You become passive and unmotivated.

Researchers listed fifteen different coping strategies commonly used by people experiencing burnout. Not all coping mechanisms are constructive.

  1. Social support
  2. Humour
  3. Better planning of workload
  4. Restraint
  5. Focus on solving the problem
  6. Personal growth
  7. Positive reinterpreting of your challenges
  8. Distracting activities
  9. Religion
  10. Acceptance
  11. Substance abuse
  12. Behavioural disengagement
  13. Venting of emotions
  14. Denying the situation
  15. Cognitive avoidance

Regardless of the coping strategies you use, try not to push through burnout. Attempt to get support, take a break, and make space for self-reflection.

Ultrasound for clinical purposes: The history
  • Ultrasound was first used for clinical purposes in 1956 in Glasgow.
  • Obstetrician Ian Donald and engineer Tom Brown developed the first prototype systems based on an instrument used to detect industrial flaws in ships.
  • They perfected its clinical use, and by the end of the 1950s, ultrasound was routinely used in Glasgow hospitals..
  • It really took off in British hospitals in the 1970s, and it was well into the 1970s before it became widely used in American hospitals.
  • By the end of the 20th century, ultrasound imaging had become routine in maternity clinics throughout the developed world.
  • Ultrasound imaging involves bouncing "ultrasonic" sound waves at body structures or tissues, and detecting the echoes that bounce back.
  • Obstetric ultrasonography is used to image a human fetus inside its mother's womb.
  • Based on the angle of the beam, and the time it takes for echoes to return, an image of body structures inside the fetus can be generated.
  • It's used to confirm a pregnancy, to identify the sex and number of fetuses and to detect fetal abnormalities such as microcephaly, absence of kidneys, and spinal problems.
Ageing well

How people age has everything to do with the life choices they make now - what they eat and how they view the world.

One of the simplest ways to age well is to understand that what you put into your body and mind will affect every part of your body.

Warning signs from your body that it is underperforming: you're achy, tired, gaining weight, and not sleeping well.

However, the right choices can radically change and even reverse some of the symptoms. Studies show that it's never too late to start new habits and experience improvements.

Researchers state that there are about 20 longevity genes with the potential to help us live longer and healthier lives. The pathways of many of these genes respond to lifestyle habits such as what, when, and how much you eat, how you move your body, how much good sleep you get, and how much stress you endure.

Recent research suggests that we should eat more protein from plants and less from animals as we age. Younger people who are still growing need more meat and dairy.

Ultraviolet light is a type of electromagnetic radiation

UV light comes from the sun and is transmitted in waves or particles at different wavelengths an frequencies.

It makes black-light posters glow, and is responsible for summer tans. But too much exposure to UV radiation damage living tissue.

EM is the broad range of wavelengths. It is divided into seven regions and ordered in decreasing wavelength and increasing energy and frequency, namely radio waves, microwaves, infrared (IR), visible light, ultraviolet (UV), X-rays and gamma-rays.

Ultraviolet light falls is the range of the EM spectrum between visible light and X-rays.

  • UVA, or near UV (315-400 nanometers)
  • UVB, or middle UV (280-315 nanometers)
  • UVC, or far UV (180-280 nanometers)

Radiations with wavelengths from 10nm to 180nm are sometimes referred to as vacuum or extreme UV.

UV radiation has enough energy to break chemical bonds. UV photons can cause ionization, meaning chemical bonds will break that otherwise would not.

It can be useful, for instance, in disinfecting a surface, but it can also damage materials and living tissues, particularly the skin and eyes that are affected by UVB and UVC radiation.

Most natural UV light comes from the sun. Only 10 % of sunlight is UV, and only one-third of it gets through the atmosphere.

Of the solar UV energy that reaches the equator, 95% is UVA, and 5% is UVB. No measurable UVC from the sun gets to the Earth's surface, because ozone, molecular oxygen, and water vapour in the upper atmosphere absorb the shortest UV wavelengths.

A suntan is a reaction to exposure to UVB rays. When the body senses sun damage, it sends melanin, a pigment in the body, to absorb UV light and protect the body from more damage, resulting in a darkened skin.

Continued exposure to UV radiation can damage the body's DNA. When the body senses this destruction, it floods the area with blood and inflammation to help with the healing process. Sometimes the cells with DNA mutated by the sun's rays turn into problem cells, known as skin cancer.

Substances like minerals, plants, fungi, microbes, and organic and inorganic chemicals, can absorb UV radiation, causing electrons to jump to a higher energy level. When the electrons return to a lower energy level, they emit a portion of the absorbed energy as visible light.

  • Fluorescence is used for signs, safety vests, and other applications in which high visibility is important.
  • In fluorescent tubes, an electric current is passed through mercury vapour, producing ultraviolet radiation along with a blue light.

There are also other celestial sources of UV radiation.

Very large young stars shine most of their light in ultraviolet wavelengths. But the Earth's atmosphere blocks much of the UV radiation, and observations are conducted using high-altitude balloons and special orbiting telescopes equipped to observe the UV region of the EM spectrum.

Some skin conditions can be treated using UV light.

PUVA (psoralen ultraviolet light treatment) is used to treat lymphoma, eczema, psoriasis, and vitiligo. Patients take a drug or apply a lotion to make their skin sensitive to light. Then a UV light is shone on the skin, slowing down the growth of the skin cells.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap