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Health

83 STASHED IDEAS

Breathing: Need To Know
  • Respiration influences many of the processes in our body that have a direct impact on our physical and mental health. 
  • Each day, we take around 20,000 breaths.
  • With every inhalation, our heart rate speeds up, and with every exhalation, it slows down. 
  • The nervous system is especially sensitive to changes in breathing rate. 
  • Through our breath, we can change our state from stress to relaxation, or from feeling dull to being energized. Longer-term, through being more attentive to the way we breathe, we can benefit our health and longevity. 
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@ame_dww

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Health

psyche.co

Some researchers envision the brain as an operating system that is ‘installed’ on neural hardware. This naive viewpoint assumes that brains and minds are identical in all living creatures, and can be separated into neat categories like hardware and software.

Even to simulate such a hypothesis requires a kind of deep understanding that we lack.

Holding a single thought is a miracle in itself, and a neural network that makes this happen cannot be mimicked, at least until the far, far future.

  • Your brain will be most alert between 10 AM and 3 PM. That is when your best work or learning is done.
  • If you still don't feel awake, you may need even more early sunlight. You need at least 1 hour of daylight exposure outside to reduce sleepiness and stay happy and productive throughout the day.
  • If you still feel tired throughout the day, 150 minutes of moderate activity a week can affect how well you sleep and how energetic you feel the next day.
  • The frenetic worker. Despite feeling overloaded and overwhelmed with work, you work increasingly harder, ignoring your own needs to the point of exhaustion.
  • The under-challenged worker. You have to cope with monotonous conditions that fail to provide satisfaction. You feel that your work lacks opportunities to develop your abilities.
  • The worn-out worker. You are mentally, physically, and emotionally exhausted. You become passive and unmotivated.
Ultrasound for clinical purposes: The history
  • Ultrasound was first used for clinical purposes in 1956 in Glasgow.
  • Obstetrician Ian Donald and engineer Tom Brown developed the first prototype systems based on an instrument used to detect industrial flaws in ships.
  • They perfected its clinical use, and by the end of the 1950s, ultrasound was routinely used in Glasgow hospitals..
  • It really took off in British hospitals in the 1970s, and it was well into the 1970s before it became widely used in American hospitals.
  • By the end of the 20th century, ultrasound imaging had become routine in maternity clinics throughout the developed world.

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