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Health

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Exercising At Home

Our lifestyles have since then changed and in order to adjust to our environment, there are things that we cannot do at the moment like go to the gym.

The good news is that you don't need to go to the gym in order to exercise at home.

@cha197

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Health

In order to make this habit a long-lasting one, we must be able to take into account the level of where we are starting. We can do this by:

  • Downloading an exercise app or watching online workouts. Having a personalized smartwatch is optional, but studies show that it is helpful to have one.
  • Finding enough space at home to work out. A space that's tall enough for us to stand in and long enough to lie down in.

There is no 'best exercise,' only the best exercise that is suited for us. In order to figure out the best kind of exercise for us is that it needs to be able to hit these three requirements:

  1. The exercise is considerate of our time
  2. The intensity of our exercise or how hard you want to work; and
  3. If we enjoy doing the exercise.

It doesn't have to be complicated. We have preferences but when we're at the starting point, we need to remember that this habit is for our long-term satisfaction.

In order to keep ourselves motivated, we must set a goal that is achievable. For a habit to stick it must be easy enough for us to fulfill.

It's like aiming to exercise twice a week because it shows a comparatively similar improvement to those who train 3x a week or wanting to be able to jog for 10 minutes straight without stopping. Always start small and build up incrementally.

Tell your friends and family about your goal so that they can help you prise off of the sofa during your "off-days."

It's really difficult to get a six-pack, but never impossible, in order to do this you need good nutrition and low levels of body fat.

Make sure to eat well and perform long low-intensity cardiovascular exercises.

Looking at screens have generated new myths

Similar to the old myth that if someone is sitting too close to the big tube TV, you would ruin your eyes, there are some new myths and facts about how screens affect our vision.

Looking at screens for too long can cause eyestrain, but so can driving long distances. Eyestrain can be caused by other vision problems like farsightedness or astigmatism.

Eyestrain is caused by the small muscles in and around the eyes and can cause headaches, blurry vision, watering eyes, and sensitivity to light. It is often temporary and will improve if you look away from the computer screen now and then.

Blue light from electronic screens is not making you blind, nor does it cause any eye disease. While research finds blue light can damage cells under certain lab conditions, it is very different from what happens in the cells of our retina.

You get lots of blue light from the sun, not just from screens. Blue light-blocking filters don't block out much blue light. You could get the same effect by holding your screen one inch farther away.

  • Use the 20-20-20 rule if you spend long periods in front of screens. Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break and look at something 20 feet away. Giving your eyes other things to look at breaks the monotony that can cause eyestrain.
  • We also tend to blink less when looking at something for a long time. If your eyes feel dry when you look at a screen for long periods, use some eye drops.
  • Protect your eyes outdoors, as ultraviolet light from the sun can damage your eyes.
Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD)

BDD is a mental disorder where a person is preoccupied with an imagined or minor physical defect that others often cannot see.

As a result, people with BDD see themselves as "ugly" and often avoid social exposure. The preoccupation with the defect often leads to ritualistic behaviours, such as always looking in a mirror or picking at the skin. The person with BDD eventually becomes overly obsessed with the defect so that their social, work, and home functioning suffers.

The most common areas of concern include:

  • Skin imperfections: Wrinkles, scars, acne, and blemishes.
  • Hair: Including head or body hair or absence of hair.
  • Facial features: It often involves the nose but might involve the shape and size of any feature.
  • Bodyweight: Sufferers may obsess about their weight or muscle tone.

Other areas of concern include the size of the penis, muscles, breasts, thighs, buttocks, and body odours.

  • Engaging in repetitive behaviours, such as looking in a mirror, picking at the skin, trying to cover up the perceived defect.
  • Continually asking for reassurance that the defect is not too noticeable.
  • Repeatedly measuring or touching the perceived defect.
  • Experiencing problems at school or work, or in relationships, due to the inability to stop focusing on the perceived defect.
  • Feeling self-conscious and not wanting to go out in public.
  • Repeatedly consulting medical specialists to find ways to improve their appearance.

One theory suggests BDD involves a problem with the size or functioning of specific brain areas. BDD often occurs in people with other mental disorders, such as major depression and anxiety.

Other factors that trigger BDD include:

  • Experience of traumatic events or emotional conflict in childhood.
  • Low self-esteem.
  • Parents and others who were critical of the person's appearance.
  • Pressure from peers and society that equates physical appearance with beauty and value.

Many BDD cases go unrecognised because people with the disorder often feel embarrassed and reluctant to speak about their concerns.

Treatment for BDD includes a combination of the following therapies:

  • Psychotherapy. Individual counselling focuses on changing the thinking and behaviour of a person with BDD.
  • Medication. Certain antidepressant medications called SSRIs are showing promise, as are antipsychotic medicines.
  • Group and/or family therapy.

The outlook is promising for people with BDD who receive and follow treatment. Those with a strong support team tend to do better in the long run.

People with BDD are at high risk for developing major depression, and the distress associated with the disorder puts people with BDD at high risk for suicide. Treatment is advisable as soon as a person begins to have symptoms. Encouraging healthy and realistic attitudes about body image is helpful, as well as a supportive environment.

Working From The Bedroom

Many of us are working from home, with our bedroom doing double duty as our office cabin. There is less exposure to daylight as we stay indoors more, mainly due to lack of a commute, resulting in our body clocks not syncing properly with the time of day.

These factors can affect our ability to sleep and also our sleep quality.

Bright light in the mornings is crucial for an alertness boost, so a daily morning outdoors exercise routine is recommended.

Apart from that, warm and dim lighting at night promotes sleep.

Our sleeping space can be disrupted by work-related clutter that adds to stress, like reminders for tasks, and the deadlines that we dread.

This can result in poor sleep. It’s important to keep the bedroom area work-free post your working hours.

Working on the bed affects one’s sex life as well, as never in thousands of years has a couple been together 24 hours a day.

Working, eating, sleeping and parenting in the same area of space can make it difficult to switch context, and it may help to move some furniture, alter the lighting, or create a different environment using fragrances to ensure that there is a ‘break’ from the other routine work.

Keeping a food diary

A food diary is a useful tool to help people improve their health. It can help you understand your eating habits and help you identify what foods you eat regularly.

In a weight-loss study, participants who kept a daily food record lost twice as much weight as those who did not keep a record.

  • Write down the food or beverage as soon as you consume it.
  • Be very specific. If you are drinking a latte, write down the type and size.
  • Include any alcoholic beverages you consume.
  • Use smartphone apps like Lose It! or MyFitnessPal for information on calories and other nutrients.
  • Write down what specific foods you are eating, your beverage consumed, and how your food is prepared (baked, fried, etc.) Include sauces and dressings.
  • List how much you are eating in household measures (cups, teaspoons, tablespoons.) If possible, weigh and measure your food.
  • Note the times you're eating to identify potentially problematic times, such as late-night snacking.

Also jot down where you are eating, what else you're doing while eating, who you eat with, and how you feel while eating.

Step back and look what you've recorded. Look for trends, patterns, or habits. You might consider these questions:

  • How healthy is my diet?
  • How many servings of fruit and vegetables do I eat every day?
  • Am I eating whole grains each day?
  • Do I consume added sugar? If so, how frequently?
  • Do my moods affect my eating habits?
  • How often do I eat on the run?

Once you know which areas you can improve, set one or two healthy eating goals using the SMART goal format. That is Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-based.
For example:

  • Observing that you eat two servings of vegetables per day, a SMART goal can be to eat three servings of vegetables per day.
  • Or if you order takeout three nights per week, your SMART goal can be to order takeout only once or twice per week.

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