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Health

78 SAVED IDEAS

Joseph Pilates And The Invention of Pilates
  • German-born Joseph Pilates was living and working in England as a circus performer and boxer.
  • At the start of WWI, he was placed in forced internment. While in the internment camp, he developed floor exercises.
  • Later on, he began rehabilitating detainees who were suffering from injuries and illness. Necessity led him to use available items like bed springs and beer keg rings to create resistance exercise equipment.

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Because Joseph Pilates had experience in fitness, it enabled him to develop his work.

He studied various self-improvements systems. He drew from Eastern practices and Zen Buddhism and was inspired by the ancient Greek ideal of man that is developed in body, mind, and spirit. He studied anatomy and developed himself as a bodybuilder, wrestler, gymnast, boxer, skier, and diver.

  • In 1925, Joseph Pilates took a boat to New York City. On the boat, he met Clara, a nurse, who would become his wife and work alongside him.
  • Joseph taught in New York from 1926 to 1966. He trained a number of his students to become teachers of the Pilates method.
  • The first generation of teachers is referred to as the Pilates Elders. Some taught the approach exactly, while others integrated it into their own philosophies and exercise sciences.

The dance community depended on the Pilates method of training for the strength and grace it developed in them and its rehabilitative effects.

Dancers and elite athletes kept his work alive. When science caught up with the Pilates exercise principles in the 1980s, it lead to the surge of interest in the Pilates we have today.

Repression: A Primer

Repression in psychological terms is a defence mechanism that involves keeping our feelings, thoughts and urges out of our conscious awareness. Our unacceptable desires are kept away from our consciousness so that we are less anxious.

It is a process by which painful and disturbing thoughts are intentionally hidden, and was first identified by Sigmund Freud. He compared the mind to an iceberg, where only the tip is visible and the major portion is hidden.

The visible aspects of our mind consist of the thoughts, feelings and memories that we are aware of, and are in the conscious mind. The impulses, desires, memories and thoughts below the surface, are out of sight and reside in the unconscious mind.

Repression was a crucial finding for Freud, as the entire concept of psychoanalysis rested on the fact that unconscious and repressed feelings are blocking the mind of the person and leading to psychological distress.

Suppression (often confused with repression) is a type of defence mechanism, where a person consciously tries to forget or not think of certain unwanted impulses or thoughts.

With repression, this activity happens automatically without any conscious effort or intention.

  • Primary repression is when unwanted impulses are hidden even before it reaches consciousness, and happens entirely in the unconscious mind. There is almost no awareness of the repression activity on the individual.
  • Repression proper is when a person becomes aware of the impulses and desires that are repressed, but still intentionally tries to remove it from awareness. This ‘selective forgetting’ is a way for people to block awareness of unwanted memories, especially the traumatic ones.

Our Personality, according to Sigmund Freud, has three components:

  1. The Ego: The main conscious component of the brain that acts as an interface between reality and the other two aspects of our personality listed below.
  2. The Id: The invisible, unconscious reservoir of our desires and urges that drive our basic behaviour.
  3. The Superego: The idealistic and moralistic side of our personality that includes our conscience.

The ego strives to balance the two aspects of our personality, the hidden desires and the idealistic conscience.

The repressed desires and impulses can simmer inside and come out in the form of dysfunctional behaviour and phobias.

Repressed feelings can also pop up in our dreams, and the specific events that happen in the dream world. Analysing dreams, a speciality of Sigmund Freud, results in a lot of hidden impulses being revealed.

One can also find repressed content in fears, slips of the tongue and feelings towards our loved ones, something known as the Oedipus Complex.

Memories aren’t set in stone like we all believe and can be repressed, suppressed and even falsified. Imagination, dreams and past memory feel similar to the mind.

Memory repression, false memories, and amplified memories (vividly repeating a traumatic experience) can be a result of trauma, leading to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

The benefits of having breakfast are not that obvious

Studies have shown that having breakfast can boost concentration and memory, and it also plays an important part in blood glucose regulation.

But despite the media hype, there’s no clear-cut link, for example, between breakfast and body weight, blood pressure, or cholesterol.

  • Use a healthy oil, or grill it, and don’t go overboard on portion size. 
  • A bit of bacon every now and then is fine, just remove as much fat as you can.
  • Baked beans are fantastic in the morning, so are eggs, mushrooms and tomatoes.
  • Read the labels of cereals. For some, sugar makes up more than a third of the total content. A low-sugar product contains less than 5g of sugar per 100g.
  • Go for low-sugar, fiber-filled cereals, like Weetabix, oats, and bran flakes.
  • Muesli, although healthy, is calorie-dense, so watch the portion size. 

Many juices contain the same amount of sugar as cola, but we don’t realise this. 

Go for tea and a piece of fruit, like an orange.

Breakfast doesn't kick-start your metabolism. 

Metabolism increases naturally when you get up in the morning and after you eat any meal. It doesn’t have to be breakfast.

  • Skipping breakfast has been linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. This could be because breakfast skippers tend to eat more later in the day when our bodies are more glucose intolerant.
  • People who skip breakfast tend to be lacking in key nutrients, such as fibre, iron and calcium.
Lacking energy

Many of us have tried to fix an ongoing lack of energy. We get more sleep, but then still feel exhausted.

Sleep and rest are not the same thing. We need equal restoration in the key areas of our lives.

Physical rest can be passive or active.

  • Passive physical rest includes sleeping and napping.
  • Active physical rest involves activities like stretching, yoga, and massage therapy to help improve the body's circulation and flexibility.

People who let conversations from the day fill their thoughts when they lie down to sleep often suffer from lack of mental rest. Despite sleeping eight hours, they still wake up feeling tired.

Schedule short breaks every two hours throughout your workday. Consider keeping a notepad by the bed to jot down any nagging thoughts that would keep you awake.

Bright lights, computer screens, background noise, and multiple conversations can cause our senses to feel overwhelmed.

This can be countered by closing your eyes for a few minutes in the middle of the day and unplugging from electronics at the end of the day.

This type of rest is essential for anyone who must solve problems or find new ideas.

Creative rest reawakens the wonder inside each of us. Allowing yourself to take in the beauty of the outdoors provides creative rest. Another simple way includes enjoying the arts.

Emotional rest means having the time and space to express your feelings and cut back on people-pleasing. It requires the courage to be authentic.

When we fail to differentiate between relationships that energise us from those that exhaust us, we can suffer from a social rest deficit.

To experience more social rest, connect with positive and supportive people.

This is the ability to connect beyond the physical and mental and feel a deep sense of belonging and love.

To receive this, engage in something larger than yourself. Add prayer, meditation, and community involvement to your daily routine.

  • The caffeine in your morning coffee binds to your brain's adenosine receptors, preventing the biochemical from making you tired.
  • Caffeine also builds your adrenaline supply, which increases your heart rate and allows blood to pump faster.
  • Caffeine prevents dopamine from being reabsorbed into your system, causing you to feel happy for longer.
  • The dopamine that lingers in the brain can trigger the brain to crave more caffeine.
  • The more coffee you drink, the more adenosine receptors are formed, which means you may need more coffee to keep you awake.

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