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Health

80 SAVED IDEAS

Overcompensating For The Burned Calorie

Many people, as studies suggest, tend to eat more when they exercise because increased activity makes them hungrier or they feel entitled to a reward after a tough workout. To get through this mindset, before your workout, make a post-workout snack that you can easily grab after like a piece of fruit or fat-free yogurt.

Make your calorie burn a fun activity that makes you want to go do more. When you dread to do something, you're more likely not to do it again.

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Health

Going Overboard With the Energy Bars

Energy bars are designed to refuel the body during workouts that last longer than 60 minutes. These are usually high in calories that can range from 350-500 calories, but people don't see them as actual food, therefore, grabbing "an actual meal" after the workout.

Use your calorie intake wisely and opt for natural food instead. Focus on fruits, vegetables, and grains for carbs; poultry, fish, and red meat for protein; and nuts and avocados for fats, these have more vitamins and nutrients.

When Eating and Exercise Habits Don't Work

Your diet and exercise must complement each other. It's impossible to sustain a diet that makes you consume 800 calories in a day with an intense workout session.

Exercising with no energy will make you hate it and eventually discourage you from doing it again. Instead, pick a workout routine or a sports goal and meet with a dietitian to customize an eating plan that will complement your lifestyle.

Adopting Diets Off The Shelf

We see many celebrities go on these "diets" and think to ourselves that it could work for us. However, these diets are only effective on a short-term basis, they're usually hard to follow and you'll eventually gain the weight back.

Adopt an eating plan you can afford. It is important to have a healthy relationship with food instead of a fear-based one.

Those who eat what they want with guilt tend to have less control over their eating habits than those who eat to celebrate.

Doing Too Much Too Soon

When we start our diets we tend to get excited about counting calories. It's not far off that we also overexercise but undereat.

Having a habit as such is unsustainable in the long run. You won't be able to manage your diet because of the excessive restriction we place on ourselves.

Baby steps are more effective. Make small dietary changes at a time and allow yourself time to adjust before making another change.

Meal Plan: The Simple Method
  1. Eat real, whole foods you love.
  2. Cut back a little at a time. Dieting shouldn't be zero to a hundred. It's okay to start slowly but surely.
  3. Look for bumps and plan ahead. Office parties? Celebrations? Think ahead and deal with how you will tackle this obstacle.
  4. Sharing your progress with other people will help build your confidence in taking accountability and even motivate you.
  5. Cheat day? Remove the guilt! Learn how to get back on track and eat reasonable portions instead of pigging out.
  1. Sneaky calories - there are a lot of hidden calories that we don't see or often take notice to such as oil servings or juices that we don't include in our calorie count.
  2. Extreme diets - fads and trendy diets ebb and flow, but your goal is to have a healthy and nutrient rich body, stick to what is best for you in the long run.
  3. Starving yourself - a little hunger is okay, but to starve yourself is a completely different scenario. it’s best to reduce portions a little at a time.
Juice Cleansing

Marketers promote juice cleanses as a way to get rid of toxic overload, regaining balance after a period of unhealthful eating, or jump-starting wholesome habits. 

But juice cleanses and liquid detox diets are not a healthful or safe approach to weight loss. There's no scientific research that it provides benefits in the short or long term, and it's not an overall healthy approach to eating.

The body detoxifies itself naturally, primarily through the action of the liver, kidneys and gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

These organs help remove toxins or harmful substances that should not be stored in the body, so we don't need to do a juice cleanse or follow a liquid detox diet to be healthy.

A juice cleanse offers people a false sense of security that they are doing something beneficial, when in fact they're not.

You may lose a few pounds on the scale during the first days, but once you come off a cleanse, and eat food, you could gain all this weight right back.

Cleansing is ineffective as a long-term solution to weight loss. A person may shed pounds in the beginning of a cleanse, but this is due to a loss of water, she said.

But the loss of water weight comes at the expense of a loss of muscle, which is a steep price to pay.

Many celebrities have popularized the idea of cleansing. Some stars have tried the approach as a quick way to lose weight, while others have done it to feel healthy after overindulging. 

And once people hear the hype and that the "famous and beautiful people" are doing it, everybody else wants to jump on the trends. 

Understanding Metabolism

Metabolism is the chemical reactions that are needed in our bodies to maintain life as an organism.

It helps convert food into energy, breaking down food into building blocks for various elements, and to eliminate nitrogenous wastes from the body.

A person with slow metabolism will not burn the same quantity of energy as one with a fast metabolism.

What still remains a moving target is how the speed of metabolism varies from one person to another, and what will turn it up or down.

The energy value of any food is measured in calories, and the basal metabolic rate is the minimum amount of calorie count that is required when the body is at rest (Resting Energy Expenditure). Combining it with the energy one consumes while moving around or digesting food gives us the total energy expenditure.

Our body energy needs are dependent on our age, height, weight, genetics and gender, apart from our daily activity.

  • Certain medical conditions and general health also contribute as factors in our metabolic rate.
  • The thyroid gland produces a chemical called ‘thyroxine’ which regulates a person’s basal metabolic rate.
  • Depression, diabetes, fasting, having fever, low blood oxygen too play a huge factor in our caloric requirements and calorie expenditure
  • For an average adult female, the estimated daily intake is 1600 to 2400 calories.
  • For the average adult male, it is 2000 to 3000 calories per day.
  • Children have a higher speed of metabolism, especially in stages of infancy.
  • Two people of the same body type and weight can have a 30 percent variation in their caloric needs due to how much body movement happens during the day.
Obesity: The Facts
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 80 %of adults and about one-third of children now meet the clinical definition of overweight or obese. More Americans live with “extreme obesity“ than with breast cancer, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and HIV put together.
  • Studies have found that about one-third of people classified as obese are metabolically healthy. They show no signs of elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance or high cholesterol.
Diets and Health

For half a century, doctors and researchers have known two things that could have improved, or saved, millions of lives:

  • Diets do not work. Not just paleo or Atkins or Weight Watchers or Goop, but all diets.
  • Being fat does not necessarily mean being unhealthy.
About Diets
  • A 2016 study that followed participants for an average of 19 years found that unfit skinny people were twice as likely to get diabetes as fat people, who were relatively fit.
  • Americans spend more on dieting every year than on video games or movies.
Treating Obese patients
Doctors have shorter appointments with fat patients and have been reported to show less emotional rapport during the interaction.
Making people guilty about being fat
Bioethicist Daniel Callahan said people should be made to feel ashamed of being obese. “People don’t realize that they are obese or if they do realize it, it’s not enough to stir them to do anything about it". He kicked his cigarette habit due to shame, so is applying the same psychology to obesity.
Nutritional Information to youngsters
According to a 2015 survey, students receive an average of 19 hours of nutrition education over four years of school time—five hours fewer than they got in 2006.
Ultra-Processed Foods
60% of the calories Americans consume come from '"ultra-processed foods”, according to the British Medical Journal (2016).
Reluctance to see a Doctor
Three separate studies have found that fat women are more likely to die from breast and cervical cancers than non-fat women, a result partially attributed to their reluctance to see doctors and get screenings/tests and timely diagnosis.
The Daily Stigma of being fat

More than 40 percent of Americans classified as obese say they experience stigma on a daily basis.

 Since 1980, the obesity rate has doubled in 73 countries and increased in 113 others. No country has reduced its obesity rate in all these years.

The number one cause of death
Diet is the leading cause of death in the US, responsible for more than five times the fatalities of gun violence and car accidents combined.
Sugar and Additives are killing us

All of our biological systems for regulating energy, hunger and satiety get thrown off by eating foods that are high in sugar (like Fructose, for instance), low in fiber and injected with additives, and which make up 60 percent of the calories we eat.

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