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Health

80 SAVED IDEAS

Savoring Chocolate: Taste
  • Take a bite of your chocolate and have your tongue spread the melting chocolate all over your palate and notice the feeling of what we can compare to a symphony.
  • The front notes, middle notes, and the afternotes of the chocolate will liven your experience.
  • Some chocolates may lead with acidity and follow with fruitiness and earthier tones.
  • The only way to build your chocolate savoring skills is to buy more chocolate and keep on tasting.

@journeerr331

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Health

Savoring Chocolate: Touch

Try to notice the texture of your chocolate. Is it smooth? Gritty? Is there texture? Rub your fingers on the chocolate and feel it.

Some chocolates that are silkier have more cocoa butter in them and those that have a rough feel might have been stone-ground.

Savoring Chocolate: Sound

When you snap the chocolate in two, we don't often think about it, but it gives us a peek as to how the chocolate was tempered.

Savoring Chocolate: Smell

Cocoa has more than 600 aroma compounds that range from bright, tart berries to sweet floral noted.

You'll be stormed by scents as you open your chocolate bar and even more so when it melts on your tongue and wafts through your nose and the back of your throat.

Savoring Chocolate: Sight
  • Unwrap your chocolate bar and look at it.
  • Cocoa beans are diverse and can vary in color from reddish to dark brown. Sometimes your chocolate may have a whitish discoloration but this doesn't mean that your chocolate went bad.
  • Cocoa beans have a very high fat composition and sometimes the fat crops up to the surface.
Excessive Sugar Intake

The excessive consumption of sugar is linked to an increased risk of poor health outcomes such as:

  • heart diseases;
  • type 2 diabetes;
  • weight gain;
  • higher blood pressure;
  • inflammation and many more.

It's not recommended to consume sugar that is more than ten percent of your daily calories from added sugar.

Sugar Comes in Many Different Forms

Your body is never without sugar. Even on the days, you don't "eat" sugar, your body still produces sugar, only in a different complex form.

Everything you eat - from fats to protein - will break down into sugar once we eat them. Sugar can come in the form of glucose, fructose, sucrose, or lactose.

A Better Approach To Quitting Sugar

The best approach to quitting sugar is to eat it when you want it. The more you allow yourself to consume the foods that you feel are addictive, the more they tend to lose their excitement.

The main reason as to why we "crave" and look for sugar or feel why we're addicted to sugar is often during the times when we restrict ourselves from having it. The bottom line is to have it when you want it and to eat meals that contain all three macronutrients to dull constant sugar cravings.

Sugar Detox Rules Are Vague

Those who advocate for "quitting sugar" make arbitrary rules by listing down which foods are okay to eat and the ones that they are going to avoid.

However, this then becomes a slippery slope because there's no standard to what a sugar detox entails. As time goes on, the lack of an agreed-upon definition of a sugar detox will only further misinterpretation.

Ordinary and altered states of consciousness

Altered states of consciousness can only be defined if there is an understanding of an ordinary state of consciousness.

While scientists can't agree on a clear definition, altered states of consciousness are nevertheless essential to understanding the human mind.

  • Excessive dancing, meditation, and mind-altering plants were used in ancient civilizations to modulate the activity of the mind.
  • In 1892, the term "altered states of consciousness" was used to refer to hypnosis.
  • William James introduced the scientific investigation of mystical experiences and drug-induced states into the field of psychology.
  • Pharmacological. These altered states include short-term changes caused by psychoactive substances, such as LSD MDMA, cannabis, cocaine, opioids, and alcohol.
  • Psychological. Hypnosis, meditation, and music can lead to altered mental states.
  • Physical and physiological. An altered state of consciousness is achieved through sleep, where dreams dissociate one from reality.
  • Pathological. A traumatic experience causing brain damage can lead to an altered state of consciousness. Other sources include epileptic or psychotic episodes.
  • Spontaneous. Daydreaming and mind wandering can cause altered states.
The Rise of Nutritionism
  • Nutritionism is not the same as nutrition. It is not a scientific subject but an ideology.
  • Ideologies are ways of organizing large areas of life and experience under a set of shared but unexamined assumptions.
  • For nutritionism, the widely shared but unexamined assumption is that the key to understanding food is the nutrient; foods are essentially the sum of their nutrient parts.
  • This means that to live in this ideology of eating unseen nutrients (unlike food, we don't see nutrients) you need lots of expert help.
  • Nutritionism is good for the food business but no so much for us.

Nutritionism divides nutrients in food into healthy and unhealthy ones: good nutrients and bad. This ideology has a hard times making a qualitative distinctions between foods.

Fish, beef and chicken become in this case just delivery systems for varying quantities of fats, proteins and other nutrients are on their scope. In the same way, any qualitative distinctions between processed foods and whole foods disappear when your focus is on quantifying the nutrients they contain.

  • From whole foods to refined: a change toward increasingly refined foods (mostly carbohydrates)
  • From complexity to simplicity: the industrialization of the food chain has involved a process of chemical and biological simplification
  • From quality to quantity: not only we’re eating a whole lot more but we’re getting substantially less nutrition per calorie than we used to.
  • From leaves to seeds: leaves provide a host of critical nutrients a body can’t get from a diet of refined seeds.
  • From food culture to food science: the industrialization of food is deliberately undermining traditional food cultures everywhere.

To escape the Western diet and the ideology of nutritionism, we have only to stop eating and thinking that way.

  • Instead of stressing over nutrients, just avoid any food that has been processed to such an extent that it is more the product of industry than of nature.
  • The surest way to escape the Western diet is simply to depart the realms it rules: the supermarket, the convenience store, and the fast-food outlet.
  • Don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food
  • Don’t eat anything that is incapable of rotting
  • Avoid food products containing ingredients that are unfamiliar, hard to pronounce unpronounceable, more than five in number, and that include high-fructose corn syrup
  • Avoid food products that make health claims; a health claim on a food product is a good indication that it’s not really food
  • Shop the edges of the supermarket and stay out of the middle. In most supermarkets, processed food products dominate the center aisles while fresh food line the walls
  • Get out of the supermarket whenever possible and go to a farmers’ market.
Eat Mostly Plants
  • Eat mostly plants, especially leaves
  • Eat as many different kinds of plants as possible as they all have different antioxidants
  • Plant foods—with the exception of seeds—are less energy-dense so you’ll likely consume fewer calories
  • We don’t need to eat meat—with the exception of vitamin B12, every nutrient found in meat can be obtained somewhere else
  • If you eat meat, buy it in bulk and freeze it. Freezing does not significantly diminish the nutritional value of produce
  • The greater the diversity of foods you eat, the more likely you are to cover all your nutritional bases
  • Eat well-growth food from healthy soils: look for food that is both organic and local
  • Eat wild foods when you can
  • Eat according to the rules of your traditional food culture
  • Pay more, eat less. Better food costs more.
  • Eat until you are 80% full. It takes 20 minutes before the brain gets the word that the belly is full. Eat slower and consult your sense of satiety
  • Eat meals. Snack less
  • Do all your eating at a table and try not to eat alone
  • Serve smaller portions on smaller plates
  • Use glasses that are more vertical than horizontal. We tend to pour more into squat glasses
  • Leave healthy foods in view, unhealthy ones out of view
  • Leave serving bowls in the kitchen rather than on the table to discourage seconds
  • Eat slowly. “Slow” in the sense of deliberate and knowledgeable eating
  • Cook and, if you can, plant a garden. The food you grow yourself is fresher than any you can buy.

Any kind of exercise, be it aerobic, walking or Yoga, changes the brain's composition, structure and the way it operates. The changes that happen to the brain:

  • Brain waves increase
  • Increased sensitivity to surroundings
  • The building of neurotransmitters and increased neuro-connections
  • De-ageing.
Brain Waves increasing

The brain's electric impulses change, and the Beta waves increase during and after exercise, putting it in a better, more alert state.

More Sensitive To The World

Exercise makes our senses sharper and clearer, and we are more perceptive and have better sensitivity to our surroundings.

Neuron Magic

After exercise, the brain actually builds neurotransmitters, which are essential to its functioning, and optimal operation.

It also forms more neuron connections, helping us think and work better.

The Brain is Young again

The structural changes in the brain after exercise make it more agile, young and energetic. This is because, after regular exercise, it starts to promote the body's growth cells, providing us with essential nutrients.

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