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Career

49 SAVED IDEAS

The Principle Of Authority

According to the author and psychologist Robert Cialdini, people resort to ‘fixed-action patterns’ in this fast-paced world, and authority plays a huge factor in the science of influence and persuasion. People listen to and trust an authority figure, as they are too busy to study everything in detail.

Word of mouth also works in the same way, as if someone is trusted by the people in our circle, we also tend to trust that person.

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Career

Pick a field where you can easily leverage your strength. Ask yourself if you see yourself doing this particular work till you retire, picking an industry that you really love and enjoy, instead of trying to be an expert in multiple fields unrelated to one another.

Creating something of value, like a painting, app, or book puts you in the category of an ‘author’ or a ‘creator’ automatically.

A book, even a self-published one, is an ideal stamp of authority and builds credibility to your other work like public speaking or blogging.

Helping others and showcasing their success stories creates a synergy effect, and helps one succeed in the long run. Ask people to be featured on your blog/site/podcast and collect their testimonials. It creates a body of work that other people (like clients of book publishers) can check and determine if you are the best person for the task.

We need to build value by demonstrating the benefits of our product or service.

Associate yourself with brands, trusted people, publications and online authority figures to build social proof. Focus on getting ‘logos’ to create instant persuasion or influence. Getting published in an authoritative source is not easy, but can build credibility that will last.

People hire credible, authoritative people, mostly deciding by checking the body of work, associations and testimonials. Make sure your profile is authoritative, and that you deserve it.

The goal of listening is to make the other person feel heard. Listening is understanding where emotions come from, and it is not always rational. It is based on experiences and perspectives.


We all have biases and blind spots. That makes it essential to have uncomfortable conversations with the different races in your company. Vulnerability is the best way to start these conversations to determine if you do things right or wrong. Ask them to help you get it right if you have made mistakes. 

Too many leaders are trying to lead by email. We need humanity more than well-articulated emails.


Call your employees and ask them how they are doing. Take the time to listen to them. Treat them like friends. They should feel heard at the end of the call. If it is a larger company, check in on your leaders, and lean on them to check in on their teams.

  • Develop relationships with your team members: that way both of you are more willing to listen.
  • Don’t put it off.
  • Choose a private and safe place.
  • Plan what you’re going to say, according to the person you are talking to.
  • Be factual and objective
  • Wait for the other person to talk next. When you’ve said your piece, shut up. 
  • Don’t end the session until you’ve agreed on 3 things:  what will change, when it will change and how both of you will know that it’s changed.
When Feedback Is Not Helpful

Most managers do not make use of feedback as a way to be helpful to the employee or even the organization. According to a study, only a quarter of employees agree that the feedback helps them perform better.

The decentralized, remote and agile nature of modern organizations is changing how people work, and most prefer autonomy and creative solutions, rather than walking the path the manager tells them to.

Organizations require managers to get employees work on multiple projects, multiple deadlines, while removing the barriers and managing interpersonal and communication challenges.

Even more than the bottom line, effective management is often how the customer, team, employee or vendor are feeling about their interactions and actions.

The traditional method of feedback, the one-way, isolated, episodic interaction in which the manager politely uses the sandwich approach to focus on past mistakes is not working any more.

An interactive two-way communication is key, in which genuine, sincere and meaningful conversation is evident and is heard both ways. If there is a script to be followed at all times, then there is a problem, but if difficult conversations start to look easy due to frequent, human conversations, then a two-way street has been established.

When the employee experiences bitter feedback related to the past which is useless to the current scenario, it creates an atmosphere of distrust. Managers need to be adaptive and coach the employee in real-time, focusing on the future, and not on the past.

Great managers paint a vision of the upcoming goal, and how to succeed in achieving the same, while clearing the obstacles the employee will eventually face.

Leaders need to set up learning and development programs for managers to act in a way leaders do, making sure that they:

  1. Learn more about employees and their issues.
  2. Ask questions.
  3. Listen actively.
  4. Encourage ideas at all times.
  5. Play to the employees strengths.
Alexandria during the third and second centuries BCE

Alexandria, with its Great Library, was marked as the intellectual capital of the world.

During the third century BCE, the Musaeum, an educational and research institution, was built in Alexandria. The Great Library was one part of the Musaeum and may have held around 700,000 scrolls (equivalent to over 100,000 printed books.)

Alexandria was founded in 331BCE by the Macedonian leader Alexander the Great. Alexander left Egypt a few months later, leaving his viceroy Cleomenes in charge.

Alexander passed away in 323 BCE, and one of his deputies, Macedonian general Ptolemy Lagides, took control of Egypt. Ptolemy executed Cleomenes and declared himself pharaoh. He started the Ptolemaic dynasty and made Alexandria his capital in 305 BCE.

The city's population grew to around 300,000 people. It remained the capital of Ptolemaic Egypt, as well as Roman and Byzantine Egypt, for almost a thousand years.

Alexandria was designed by the architect Dinocrates of Rhodes, using a Hippodamian gridiron street plan. The city was cosmopolitan and diverse. It consisted of Greeks, Jew, and Egyptian Arabs.

The Musaeum, or "shrine of the Muses," from where we get the word museum, included a lengthy roofed walkway and a large communal dining hall, where scholars dined and shared ideas. The scholars were salaried employees, received free room and board, and paid no taxes.

The Musaeum contained exhibit halls, private study rooms, lecture halls, residential quarters for scholars, and theatres. The Great Library held shelves upon shelves of papyrus scrolls and was envisioned as a universal library that would contain all the world's written knowledge.

The idea of a universal library proved to be a game-changer. Alexandria inspired other cities to create rival "universal libraries," such as the Library of Pergamum in today's Turkey.

The Great Library's main structure was likely burned in 48BCE when Ptolemy XIII laid a siege against his wife and co-ruler Cleopatra and her lover, the Roman dictator Julius Caesar. The smaller library building in the Serapeum temple, which was added when the first library ran out of space, may have survived until the 4th century when the Byzantine Emperor Theodosius I ordered all pagan temples to be destroyed.

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