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Career

76 SAVED IDEAS

Coming To Work While Sick
  • Many workers don’t want to take an off even if they are unwell, due to the fear of judgement and a general distrusting attitude from their bosses.
  • There is a stigma around taking an off day, with 40 percent of workers lying to their managers the real reason for not showing up at work.
  • Presenteeism has increased three-fold over the past decade, while absenteeism due to sickness has halved in the last twenty years.

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Career

Certain kinds of sickness, like the flu, can become problematic due to their contagious nature, yet many employees feel they should attend office. Mental health-related issues are not considered good enough reasons to stay at home, as they appear invisible or intangible.

With companies striving for maximum productivity, and the gig economy making jobs fleeting and project-based, most workers don’t want to be left behind and are holding tighter to their jobs.

Many employers show deep distrust and create a toxic, fear-based environment for the workforce by not allowing people to take sick days or not showing support and understanding for those who are suffering from illnesses.

Employees should communicate with the manager as soon as possible, allowing them to plan the day’s work. Being honest is the best policy to avoid any misunderstanding, with lying or exaggerating being the worst mistakes.

  • The first kind of managers are having the industrial age ‘productivity’ mindset, and believe that workers are not willing to work by default and need to be trapped in rules and regulations. Sick leaves are perceived as an excuse not to work.
  • The second kind of managers trust their employees and see them as responsible adults. They empower their workforce to take time off when needed, even encouraging them to go offline completely and focus on rest.

A good manager has to be understanding and empathetic, building a bond with the employees through genuine care.

Desiring the role of a CEO

Many young professionals and MBA students desire to become a CEO. What stands out is the mindset to want to lead.

Many aspirants want to have an impact. They desire to make a real and tangible difference in the world. They see business as a vehicle for impact, and the role of a CEO as a destination for creating change.

If you long to create an impact and aspire to lead an organisation, consider what it takes to lead thousands of employees and be great at it.

It requires:

  • motivation and focus for a journey that will likely take decades. (In 2020, the average age of new CEOs and CFOs at the biggest U.S. companies was 54 and 48 years old, respectively.
  • skills that will distinguish you among your peers and enable you to lead at scale.

Consider in which pathway your potential leadership impact lies.

  • The organisational architect. These leaders can build strong teams and organisational structures, systems, and processes that lead to exceptional results.
  • The relationship maven. These leaders focus on cultivating relationships and helping other people grow.
  • The passion player. These leaders focus on purpose - what they will accomplish and why.
  • They understand the fundamental reality that to build a real advantage is to create an engine for growth that will endure.
  • They can reimagine markets and attract exceptional talent.
  • They know how to assemble strong players across business functions and can give direction, resources, and freedom to deliver.

People who are naturally drawn to this instinctively rethink systems, processes, and reporting structures. They have a fixer mindset and can persuade and motivate others to exceed expectations.

  • They are people persons.
  • They naturally form genuine relationships with a diverse group of executives, internally and externally.
  • People like them because they have an earnestness that causes trust and goodwill with customers, partners, and suppliers.
  • In time, these leaders naturally bring different people together to start deals and collaborations that get bigger over time.
  • They have a natural curiosity about people. They keep in touch with the people they find most interesting.
  • These leaders have an infectious energy and compelling conversation about "why we do this" that draws people toward them.
  • They believe doing something significant is what matters, and they use that belief to gather and motivate others to their cause.
  • They are often deep experts in a specific area.
  • They often take risks.

These leaders start this pathway by identifying purpose-driven leaders, reading their books, watching their speeches and videos. They notice how they frame problems and tell stories.

Career negotiation and opportunities for advancement

Professionals often think of career negotiation as bargaining over an offer package.

Although reaching agreement on pay and benefits is necessary, it is vital to think more broadly about your career to include opportunities for advancement.

  • Asking negotiations. You propose something that's standard for someone in your role or at your level.
  • Bending negotiations. You request a personal exception or unusual arrangement, for example, remote work setup or a promotion where you lack conventional qualifications.
  • Shaping negotiations. You propose ways to play a role in changing your organizational environment or creating a new initiative.

Organizations may be very open to shaping negotiations during challenging or fast-changing times,

People often walk blind into a potential negotiation. They lack information on what is negotiable. It is vital to reduce vagueness and ensure that you get a fair opportunity.

Write down all the questions you have.

  • What is potentially negotiable?
  • How should I negotiate?
  • Who will be my counterparts, and what do they care about?

Find answers from talent professionals, a media search, or contact a professional on LinkedIn who can tell you more about the hiring manager.

Negotiating your role - the scope of your authority and your developmental opportunities - may benefit your career more than negotiating your pay. Negotiating your workload, responsibilities, location and travel requirements may be critical to advance professionally.

Keep your eye on larger objectives. Negotiate with the right parties about the right issues.

Negotiators frequently start their preparation focused on the opportunity right in front of them, such as a job offer.

Instead, consider your short- and long-term goals, then work backwards from those objectives to define the next steps you want to take. Include quality-of-life and professional considerations.

As you try to reduce ambiguity, you will think of people who might give you information, advice, or social support. Also, figure out who will speak up in favour of your proposal.

Talk to key stakeholders individually to get their feedback and input. It enables you to explore people's interests and concerns and incorporate their ideas into your game plan. If you're concerned about appearing conniving or manipulative, explain that you're seeking input on an idea you have.

There will be false starts and reversals. Maximise the odds of your success by setting targets for yourself that are specific and realistic. Negotiations often fizzle out because larger goals become buried by everyday work.

Great careers are not made in a vacuum. You need work and life partners, and negotiation is at the heart of finding ways to realise your path.

  • Make it relevant:  if what you're telling someone isn't aligned with their goals in some way, the impact of your feedback will be limited.
  • Stay focused on a limited number of issues you want to address.
  • Provide context, if you hope to influence someone's behavior.
  • Listen carefully.
  • Be compassionate.
  • Follow-up: from time to time, refer back to what you agreed when you had your conversation.
Constraints vs Obstacles

Constraints are viewed as obstacles. The common wisdom regarding obstacles suggests that we have to remove all constraints.

We tend to believe that by getting rid of all rules and regulations, real creativity and innovation will start to emerge.

Embracing Constraints

New research suggests that managers can innovate better by embracing and working with constraints, instead of viewing them as a hindrance to innovation.

The Mind Needs A Challenge

When there are no challenges in the creative process, complacency comes in, and people tend to go for the most intuitive and easy ideas rather than investing in the development of better but difficult to implement ideas.

Providing Limited Resources

Managers may intentionally limit inputs by capping resources in corporate entrepreneurship projects, to motivate employees to challenge themselves and innovate.

A Balancing Act

Do not impose too many constraints, otherwise, employee motivation is hampered and creative ideas don't have breathing space.

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