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Career

69 STASHED IDEAS

James Clear

"Successful people start before they are even ready".

Thea F. (@theaf511) - Profile Photo

@theaf511

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Career

The Corridor Principle

The corridor principle experiment was conducted in a study done by Robert Ronstadt back in the 1980s. He explained the principle as the mere act of starting a venture in which enables entrepreneurs to see other opportunities they could neither see nor take advantage of until they had started their initial venture.

The difference between those who succeeded in the entrepreneurial field was because they took the chance to launch themselves even without the guarantee of success.

The Corridor Principle in Everyday Life

When we have the opportunity to take action towards our goals and expand our comfort zone in order to gain the knowledge necessary for us to pull through, we'll be able to improve drastically.

What we accomplish in our life always begins with our willingness to face the uncertainty of everything and be able to move through confidently towards our goal. So keep in mind that time and opportunity don't wait for us, we must take a leap of faith and take action for ourselves.

Capable People Unwilling To Lead

Most people would want to grow in an organization, and strong leadership is essential for both professional and personal growth. Yet many capable team workers are reluctant to move towards a leadership role even when they have an opportunity.

The reason is the various perceived risks that make people not take up leadership roles even when they are deserving and capable.

A manager can identify a suitable and potentially capable employee by assessing his working style and provide them with opportunities for leading that may have a higher chance of success.

This also builds confidence while honing their leadership skills.

  1. Be extra supportive of the fragile, risk-sensitive colleagues. Seek their input and publicly praise them for their team efforts.
  2. Relationship conflicts, differences of opinions, values or personality issues and the perception that comes with it needs to be managed before they escalate.
  3. Make the would-be leaders take up small, low-stakes opportunities and let them take baby steps towards higher-visibility roles once they gain confidence and build a reputation.
  1. Interpersonal Risk: When people are reluctant to lead due to spoiling a friendship or hurting a fellow workers feelings.
  2. Image Risk: People don’t want to come across as a ‘Mr Know It All’ or someone aggressive in front of all the team members.
  3. Risk Of Getting Blamed: Being a leader means that if the team fails, the person in charge takes all the blame. This loss aversion makes many shun a leadership opportunity.
7 key behaviors  for virtual leaders
  • Clarify expectations. Bad assumptions multiply when there is less regular conversation.
  • Don't worry about how the team spends their time and focus on results.
  • Make time to build relationships
  • Grant trust and expect the best.
  • Be patient. Some things will take more time when you aren't in close proximity.
  • Create actionable meetings: Schedule short meetings with clear agendas.
  • Take advantage of technology
Saint Francis of Assisi

"Start by doing what’s necessary, then do what’s possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible."

Henry Ford

"Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress, and working together is success."

Sandra Day O'Connor

"We don't accomplish anything in this world alone ... and whatever happens is the result of the whole tapestry of one's life and all the weavings of individual threads form one to another that creates something."

Buddha

"No matter how hard the past is, you can always begin again."

Walt Disney

"The right way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing."

John F. Kennedy

"Every accomplishment starts with the decision to try."

Martin Luther King Jr.

"Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase."

Steve Jobs

"The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life."

Joan of Arc

"Get up tomorrow early in the morning, and earlier than you did today, and do the best that you can."

Winston Churchill

"Beginning with audacity is a very great part of the art of painting."

Plato

"The beginning is the most important part of the work."

In the 70s, creativity was thought of as a trait, something a few geniuses have, and the rest of us do not.

New studies show that ‘extrinsic’ motivators, factors outside ourselves, can influence our creativity. Competition, evaluation, level of strictness along with rewards and punishment play a huge factor in a person’s overall creative levels.

Managers need to pay attention to the needs of the subordinates to make progress in the core work, while providing them sufficient resources and time, and encouraging them to learn from failure.

Organizations can save a lot of time and money by fostering creativity instead of waiting to hire that elusive creative person.

Intellectual challenges, alone with sufficient resources and freedom to experiment are the ideal ingredients of a creative workplace.

Managers should encourage innovative thinking and be trusting, and supportive towards the team, while being receptive to new ideas. Clear, honest communication, along with clarity of goals fosters a free flow of ideas, important for high creativity.

How Social Environments Influence Creativity

As we grow older, we take cues from our environment and become serious and rigid, conforming to the norms and rules imposed upon us.

Our social environment, especially our workplace can affect our creativity, as we lose our freedom and playfulness, not able to conjure up new ideas or do any innovative thinking.

Knowledge that someone will check, evaluate and grade one’s work, surveillance, a promise of a reward, threat of a punishment, creative constraints, competition and motivating factors like power, money and fame can kill creativity.

Rewards generally provide the individual with a feeling of being controlled, but can also enhance creativity in some cases.

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