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51 STASHED IDEAS

An ethical dilemma (ethical paradox or moral dilemma) is a problem in the decision-making process between two possible options, neither of which is absolutely acceptable from an ethical perspective.

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The biggest challenge of an ethical dilemma is that it does not offer an obvious solution that would comply with ethics al norms. 

The following approaches to solve an ethical dilemma were deduced:

  • Refute the paradox (dilemma): The situation must be carefully analyzed. In some cases, the existence of the dilemma can be logically refuted.
  • Value theory approach: Choose the alternative that offers the greater good or the lesser evil.
  • Find alternative solutions: In some cases, the problem can be reconsidered, and new alternative solutions may arise.
  • Ethical dilemmas frequently occur in the workplace. Some companies and professional organizations adhere to their own codes of conduct and ethical standards. Violation of the standards may lead to disciplinary sanctions.
  • Almost every aspect of business can become a possible ground for ethical dilemmas. It may include relationships with co-workers, management, clients, and business partners.
  • In order to solve ethical problems, companies and organizations should develop strict ethical standards for their employees. Every company must demonstrate its concerns regarding the ethical norms within the organization. In addition, companies may provide ethical training for their employees.

How everything proceeds depend on you. Tackling the issue is important but you don't have to do what you don't want to do. However, being placed with the responsibility of handling a team or a handful number of employees is a much better practice to seek first and understand.

When a project misses the mark, try focusing on the possibilities that might have happened; was there a miscommunication? Have you said something different? Is there a way to approach this with fresh eyes?

With every output, teams usually hold meetings to discuss every part of the project. It is important to clarify any questions that everyone on the team has so that time won't be wasted.

Make it a practice to recap the project, the expectations, and the next possible steps to be taken with everyone. Not only does this reduce the risk of unclear directions but it helps everyone keep on track of the project.

Emotional Intelligence ≠ "Being Nice"

Many of us believe that having emotional intelligence means being “nice.” But this belief conceals some fundamental benefits to developing one’s EI.

For example, simply saying someone is nice can belie the fact that they’re only nice to some people and not others. Niceness is also interpreted as someone who tries to avoid confrontations and is thus easily manipulable.

They are: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management.

None of these is aligned with “niceness.” In fact, being skilled in each of the four components of emotional intelligence would allow you to have confrontations when you need to, and to do it more strategically and productively.

  • Strong self-awareness and self-management would let you control your initial impulses or any anxiety you might have around a hard conversation.
  • A highly developed sense of empathy (part of social awareness) would allow you see the situation from the other person’s point of view.
  • Handling conflict is an important part of relationship management. You’d say what you have to say, clearly and strongly, and in a way the other person can hear.
  • Cognitive: "I know how you think."
  • Emotional: "I know how you feel."
  • Empathetic concern: "I care about you."

They reside in different parts of the brain:

A critical skill for leaders is the ability to figure out what kind of thinking is necessary to address a given challenge.

The wrong kind of thinking about a problem happens all the time because different types of effort require different types of knowledge. For example, you may analyze scientific data when a values-informed judgment call is needed, or you'll trust your instincts where a data analysis would expose your faulty thinking.

Solving different types of problems

Aristotle outlined distinct types of knowledge required to solve problems in three realms.

  • Techne was craft knowledge: learning to use tools and methods to create something, such as a farmer designing an irrigation system.
  • Episteme was scientific knowledge: discovering the laws of nature. An astronomer contemplating why galaxies turn the way they do will fall in this realm.
  • Phronesis was similar to ethical judgment: The perspective-taking and wisdom required to make decisions when there are multiple possible answers. For example, a policymaker deciding how to allocate limited funds.

Aristotle outlined these three kinds of knowledge because they require different styles of thinking. If you have a phronetic problem to solve, don't use an epistemic thinker.

Most leaders haven't thought much about the realms of knowledge and what problems they can solve. If you're a leader of a large corporation with challenges in all three of these realms, it's a big part of your job to ensure the right kinds of thinking are used and in which situation it is required.

That means you should be able to recognize which mode of thinking is the best fit for a given problem, and which people are able to best deal with it.

The online job application process

Online applications can take hours of candidates' time when applying for a job. While some firms are moving away from these online systems, many companies move towards them.

A recent survey states that 73% of businesses of all sizes use talent acquisition software to source, track, analyse, and onboard new recruits. 99% of the US Fortune 500 companies use applicant tracking system (ATS) providers, allowing them to customise questions and set filters, and automate the bulk of the filtering labour.

  • With newer platforms, applicants have the option of using their LinkedIn profile instead of a CV. But they may still encounter customised questions that will require a significant investment of time.
  • LinkedIn's Easy Apply button on job listings allows candidates to submit their profiles without additional materials.
  • However, the majority of New York-based positions listed on LinkedIn rely on external ATS (Applicant tracking system) to manage applications.

What serves the employer well may not work for the prospective employee.

  • According to a survey, 60% of candidates may give up on an application if it's too long or complicated.
  • A cumbersome application process likely indicates the company's attitude towards its employees or overall culture.
  • It is a dispiriting process as even seasoned applicants receive a response only 5% of the time.

From a hiring manager's perspective, applicant tracking systems are beneficial, especially with a higher volume of applicants for every open role.

ATS systems can collate the data from every applicant's resume and display it in a searchable spreadsheet. More advanced software can separate candidates without human oversight and present a sifted pool of priority applicants.

  • Technology will continue to improve in ways to benefit both parties involved in the recruiting process.
  • Advances in machine learning could enable the system to recognise and tag resumes with keyword synonyms or phrasing variations.
  • For now, candidates can take some steps to avoid being ignored. Instead of applying for a hundred jobs with a template resume, the candidate should select their top 20 postings and then write thoughtful covering letters with warm, personalised introductions.

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