🗂

Career

61 SAVED IDEAS

2 Kinds of Work Praise
  1. WE-STRENGTH - This is the type of praise where the entire team is elevated and pushed forward.
  2. ME-STRENGTH - This is the type of praise wherein it makes an individual employee stronger. It is where the person is most comfortable, joyous, and focused on work that brings them satisfaction.

However, it is important to keep in mind that every employee has different strengths where their we-strength could be intrinsically different from their me-strength.

@tucker347

🗂

Career

  1. It is important for a manager to be able to gain clarity in each employee's me-strengths. This can be done simply through observation and asking the right questions.
  2. The employees' responsibilities must have room to be exercised regularly. The space given to them will provide positive long-term results and increase employee satisfaction.

When we celebrate our employee's strengths they will feel valued and special, thus making them much more willing to exercise that strength again in the future.

In order to identify your employee's me-strengths, ask them:

  1. What do you enjoy doing but haven't done yet?
  2. What sorts of activities do you finish that make you want to do it again?
  3. What do you see on your calendar that excites you?
  4. Tell me about a time when you were doing an activity where you didn't notice how much time has passed.
  5. On your very best workday, the day you think you have the best job in the world — what transpired that day?

In order to identify your employee's we-strengths, ask them:

  1. What do other people compliment and praise you for the most?
  2. What’s gotten you the spotlight with your career?
  3. Where do you feel most useful?
  4. What have you done in the past that you’re not doing now that you think had a lot of impact?
  5. What seems to come more easily for you than for others on the team?
Building Trust While Starting A New Job

A new joinee has to showcase the skills he possesses and at the same time, build the foundation of a good relationship with the new coworkers.

Establishing trust is important to ensure success in one’s new job role.

Trust makes us feel psychologically safe at the workplace. One can focus on creative, collaborative work where there is a free flow of ideas and everyone is benefiting from each other’s energy. One can freely ask for support, test new ideas, and be oneself without any fear of judgement.

Trustworthy colleagues result in a positive, safe and comfortable work environment that translates into better work. There is less stress, faster decision making and more innovation.

One can take cues from how coworkers trust each other by their body language, the way they interact on Slack, or how relaxed and casual they are around each other.

If help is sought after, and clarifications are prompt, even during virtual (Zoom calls) environments, one can gauge the level of trust in the workplace.

A strong foundation of trust needs to be laid as early as possible. Create a ‘shield of goodwill’ to minimize any miscommunication.

Building trust will ensure that even if there is ambiguity, the words and actions are coming with good intentions.

Trustworthiness is a combination of competence and warmth. Great leaders are loved and respected, but also feared at the same time.

One has to strike the right balance between love and fear to appear authentic, vulnerable and credible. To start things off, be compassionate and warm.

  1. Talk about one’s upbringing, hardships and personal history, while keeping it work-appropriate. Getting to know people on a personal level builds trust and connections, as they see a human being and not just a new employee.
  2. Ask for help whenever possible. It shows vulnerability and boosts good feelings among team members. They like being perceived as competent while demonstrating that you are okay with admitting that you don’t know something.
  3. Ask for feedback and take your teammates' opinion whenever possible. You can ask a person having expertise, even if there is no direct work involvement.

Communication is the magic key for building trust. Body language, expressions, tone are all important.

  1. Speak in a calm, soothing voice.
  2. Make sure that the atmosphere is cheerful and smile whenever possible.
  3. Do not smile with raised eyebrows, as it looks as if there is anxiety.
  4. Do not fidget with your fingers and stand straight.

Virtual teams and WFH policies have complicated and muddled the communication that happens in a physical office. We need to provide remote team members with the benefit of the doubt while interpreting their behaviour. There is much less context to access what is meant by their words and actions.

The least we can do is watch our tone, and be as polite and generous in the initial months as possible. It always pays to be warm, friendly and human.

  1. Trust can be built by showcasing your competence and skills.
  2. Trust yourself, shaking out any imposter syndrome and do not doubt your competence.
  3. Be transparent and honest, not hiding the information that makes you appear bad.
  4. Be a person your teammates can count on, by showing your reliability and keeping your word.
  5. Accept your mistakes and do not attack or blame a coworker.
  6. Treat coworkers equally and do not show bias.
  7. Treat people with fairness, integrity and try not to be the gossipy, two-faced coworker that no one likes.
  8. Have good intentions and be the person you would trust.
Keeping Your Composure At Work

It's inevitable running into negative nancy at work or those who choose to undermine your capabilities. However, you get to decide how to handle people like them. You can either fight them or let them talk and not be bothered by what they say.

Every situation can be handled with grace as long as you let yourself do so. Take a deep breath and remember that what people say about you is ultimately a reflection of them and not you.

If your fight mode has been activated when dealing with someone that is undermining your work, don't let it eat you up entirely, instead, try to ask what they meant by their backhanded compliment.

Keep focused on staying calm so that you can address the root of the problem and not add gasoline to the fire. If they still do not want to change their mind about you, smile, move on, and be the bigger person.

Don't let a petty comment discourage you. Do not succumb to the negativity because at the end of the day what people say about you don't matter.

Your actions have more significance than what anyone else say.

The challenges of hybrid teams

Most companies embracing remote work also have dedicated headquarters. But remote-ish teams have even more communication and collaboration challenges than fully remote teams.

For example, in hybrid teams, remote employees are often left in the dark. Office workers are often heard, recognized, and promoted, while remote workers are forgotten.

The single biggest mistake companies can make is to opt to be remote-friendly instead of remote-first. Companies often accept the idea that remote is the future of work without creating an inclusive culture to ensure it works for everyone.

  • Remote-friendly environment: Employees are allowed to work remotely, but work is not optimized for it. There is a disconnect between office and remote employees and team meetings exclusively occur in a co-located time zone. Water cooler chat is a space for key decisions and presence is correlated with meaningful work. Communication is synchronous-first. Managers must work in the office.
  • Remote-first companies: Employees are empowered to adopt remote work. Real-time meetings are kept to a minimum and recorded. Decisions are made online and performance is measured by output, not by hours worked. Communication is asynchronous-first. Managers are encouraged to work from home.

Hybrid companies function best when the entire company is optimized for remote work. Successful hybrid teams set up processes to help their remote workers thrive alongside their office teammates.

Leadership must acknowledge the various challenges remote workers face and create solutions. Create a remote work policy that keeps remote workers and contractors from feeling like second class team members. Remote workers should feel fully connected and not missing a thing.

  • Mentorship weeks and in-person onboarding. Extend new remote team members the opportunity to meet their office peers by flying them out to headquarters for onboarding. It builds personal relationships early on that ease collaboration.
  • Get office colleagues to work from home. Create work from home weeks for office colleagues to help build empathy and understanding of the pain points of remote work.
  • Offer company conference perks. Give remote and office teammates a chance to build relationships through shared learning experiences with conferences or professional development opportunities.
  • Host company-wide retreats. Whenever possible, bring the entire team together for a few days for a retreat or off-site to accelerate bonding experience.

While these opportunities are costly and require coordination, they pay ongoing dividends.

Create an explicit work-from-home policy for office employees that extends the benefits of remote work to office employees. Clearly outline the expectations of remote workers in documentation.

Ensure your guideline answers the following questions:

  • Can office employees work from home any day of the week?
  • How many consecutive days can office employees work from home?
  • What is the maximum number of days an office employee can work from home?
  • Do office employees working from home need to maintain certain working hours?
  • Can office employees work remotely while travelling?
  • Do office employees need to ask for permission to work from home?

While treating both remote and office employees fairly, they don't necessarily need to be treated the same. Consider the unique needs of each group and create policies and perks that address them.

  • Office employees only can receive public transit credits, free coffee and snacks, Friday catered lunches, and an on-site fitness facility.
  • Remote employees only can receive a home office budget, healthy snacks or coffee shop allowance, and internet subsidy, one annual trip to HQ.

Remote-ish teams should adopt asynchronous communication as the primary source of correspondence.

  • Synchronous communication, where a quick back-and-forth conversation is possible, falls short for remote-ish teams. Synchronous-first teams encourage an always-on culture, defaults to meetings, relies on time zone coordination and real-time collaboration.
  • Asynchronous communication serves hybrid teams, where participants communicate when they're available and discussion occurs intermittently. Asynchronous-first teams default to writing, choose their own productive working hours, and default to undisturbed deep work.

A few important areas where centralized and accessible documentation should exist:

  • Company policies, core values, and operating principles
  • Project management system guidelines
  • Critical service outage instructions
  • Technical implementation resources
  • Product and project roadmaps
  • Career development paths
  • Decisions should be documented and the next steps put in writing

Clear and concise documentation is crucial to empower individuals and teams with the information needed to do their work. It allows remote individuals to work more independently without having to wait for an answer.

Video calls and other forms of synchronous communication still serves a function. However, synchronous communication should be made available asynchronously:

  • For occasional synchronous meetings, find reasonable time for everyone. Ensure ideal time slots are rotated between team members.
  • Try having everyone call in from their respective desks and computers to eliminate side conversations.
  • Record video calls and make them available for viewing later in a central place for all team members.
Tackling Trust Issues

It is quite possible that certain employees are not trusted by the manager, and there is a lack of confidence in their abilities. The employees are given lower-quality work or are micro-managed.

To rehabilitate the bosses trust, one has to first clarify the expectations and ask specific questions laying down what they want from you.

  • Once there is clarity, one needs to enhance the bosses perception about being competent, reliable and trustworthy. Playing on one’s strengths while correcting the weak areas is a good initial strategy.
  • Have frequent check-ins to ensure there is no derailment, or to make any course correction.
  • Provide a plan of action that is tangible, measurable and showcases your progress in a visual, clear way.
  • Provide daily or weekly updates about your activities and try to appear bold and confident.
  • Do not protest if you still get lower-quality work, as it may lead to the boss believing that you should not be given higher-quality work, just like before.
  • Be transparent and forthcoming and the work with your boss rather than providing them with bad news at the last moment.
  • Do not rush towards becoming a ‘hero’ right away, and try to make steady progress, demonstrating your competence.

Watch the level of eye contact to understand if there is a likeability problem between you and your boss. It is possible that your boss may not like you, or not relate to you, which is quite common.

Communication is key here, and one can find the areas that the boss is working on, or is interested in, and carry a conversation that can help both of you know each other well.

  • Using palm gestures at navel height creates an unconscious connection between humans, according to a leading body language expert.
  • This is because the region around our navel is a ‘truthplane’ and demonstrates that you are safe and trustworthy, with nothing to hide.
  • Having a comfortable eye gaze while communicating with the boss, and sitting right in front of them provides a better connection than sitting sideways where they strain to look at you.

Humans have a negative bias and tend to create or personalize any problem even when there are many factors that are not in one’s knowledge.

Do not be a leech just because you have this hunch that the boss doesn’t like you. It also not a good idea to complain or gossip about your boss to others, as word-of-mouth is fast.

Work towards developing and strengthening your relationship with your subordinates, peers and colleagues.

Your boss will not be able to maintain a poor image of you when there are many who speak good about you. Invest in building deep professional relationships instead of being dependent on one person that does not seem to favour you.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap