What did you learn today?

Deepstash helps you capture & organize the key insights from all online sources! We are a place for lifelong-learners to build their personalized knowledge library.

Don’t have an account? Join the waiting list:
Philosophy and Philosophers
Curated by
Philosophy and Philosophers
Philosophical quotations and relevant philosophical movements, with their basic concepts and personalities.
48 followers
CONTENT FROM:
11 Rules for Critical Thinking
7 insights
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
5 insights
The secret to a meaningful life is simpler than you think — Quartz
3 insights
What the ‘Aikido’ philosophy teaches us about creativity and courage
2 insights
Can religion be based on ritual practice without belief?
1 insight
Too Busy to Pay Attention to Life
1 insight
What is the difference between good and bad political rhetoric?
1 insight
Epistemology: How do you Know that you Know what you Know?
1 insight
Karl Popper on the Central Mistake of Historicism
1 insight
Opinion | Does Religion Make People Moral?
1 insight
Philosophical intuition: just what is ‘a priori’ justification?
1 insight
The Fairness Principle: How the Veil of Ignorance Helps Test Fairness
1 insight
21 Profound Plato Quotes For Your Life Philosophy
1 insight
You Cannot Learn What You Think You Already Know
1 insight
Finding the good – James Melcer – Medium
1 insight
Moral Outrage Is Self-Serving, Say Psychologists
1 insight
What can Aristotle teach us about the routes to happiness?
1 insight
Understanding Jordan Peterson | Alastair's Adversaria
1 insight
Schopenhauer: On Reading and Books
1 insight
Tolstoy on Knowledge and the Meaning of Life – Brain Pickings
1 insight
Timeless Wisdom on Character, Fortitude, Self-Control, and the Art of Living from Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius – Brain Pickings
1 insight
Plotinus - Ancient History Encyclopedia
1 insight
29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
1 insight
Why Wisdom Can’t Be Taught
1 insight
Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long – Brain Pickings
1 insight
Is there a fix for impostor syndrome?
1 insight
The Best Decision You Will Make Before Making a Big Decision
1 insight
Deductive vs Inductive Reasoning: Make Smarter Arguments, Better Decisions, and Stronger Conclusions
1 insight
Seneca on Grief and the Key to Resilience in the Face of Loss: An Extraordinary Letter to His Mother – Brain Pickings
1 insight
John Gray: Is Human Progress an Illusion?
1 insight
In Search of a Better World: Karl Popper on Truth vs. Certainty and the Dangers of Relativism – Brain Pickings
1 insight
How To Make Decisions Like A Professional Poker Player
1 insight
Schopenhauer on Style – Brain Pickings
1 insight
What Plato knew about behavioural economics. (A lot)
1 insight
BBC - Religions - Taoism: Taoism at a glance
1 insight
The rise and fall and rise of logic
1 insight
23 Smart Ways To Increase Your Confidence, Productivity, and Income
1 insight
The Science of “Intuition” – Brain Pickings
1 insight
51 INSIGHTs ON: Philosophy40Critical Thinking7Stoicism7Life5Thinking5Religion4Learning3Meaning of Life3Logic2Happiness2Empiricism2Humanism2Knowledge2Meaning2Progress2Truth2Psychology2Aikido2
REARRANGE YOUR INSIGHTS:
How To Make Decisions Like A Professional Poker Player
Saved in

“Uncertainty is an uncomfortable position, but certainty is an absurd one”. - Voltaire

4 months, 1 week ago
1
Karl Popper on the Central Mistake of Historicism
Saved in
Popper’s idea of falsifiability
The only way to test the validity of any theory was to prove it wrong, a process he labeled falsification.

Simply put, an idea or theory doesn’t enter the realm of science until we can state it in such a way that a test could prove it wrong. This important identifier allowed him to distinguish between science and pseudoscience.

4 months, 2 weeks ago
Plotinus - Ancient History Encyclopedia
Saved in
Neo-Platonism and Plotinus

Neo-Platonism is a modern term which defines the resurgence of Platonic thought, mixed with elements of mysticism and Christianity, which flourished in the 3rd century CE (as Rome was going through it's chaotic century), with the work of Plotinus, and ended with the closing of Plato’s Academy by the emperor Justinian in 529 CE.

Plotinus was (probably) a Greek which developed his philosophy in Alexandria. He joined Emperor Gordian III's invasion of Persia, but established to Rome after the the emperor's assassination. He did't write anything and we know him through his reviewers. 

4 months, 3 weeks ago
1
Epistemology: How do you Know that you Know what you Know?
Saved in
For Locke, our understanding of the world comes from our experience of it

 It is experience that provides knowledge. 

Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas: – How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store with the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety Whence has it all the materials or reason and knowledge? To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE. In that all our knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives itself.

4 months, 3 weeks ago
1
John Gray: Is Human Progress an Illusion?
Saved in
Science increases human power and magnifies the flaws in human nature[John Gray]

The idea of progress rests on the belief that the growth of knowledge and the advance of the species go together.

In science, the growth of knowledge is cumulative. But human life as a whole is not a cumulative activity; what is gained in one generation may be lost in the next. In science, knowledge is an unmixed god; in ethics and politics it is bad as well as good. Science increases human power — and magnifies the flaws in human nature. It enables us to live longer and have higher living standards than in the past. At the same time it allows us to wreak destruction — on each other and the Earth — on a larger scale than ever before.


4 months, 3 weeks ago
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
Saved in
HumanismHuman beings can lead happy and functional lives, and are capable of being ethical and moral without religion or dogma. Life stance emphasized the unique responsibility facing humanity and the ethical consequences of human decisions.
4 months, 4 weeks ago
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
Saved in
EmpiricismKnowledge arises from evidence gathered via sense experience. Empiricism emphasizes the role of experience and evidence, especially sensory perception, in the formation of ideas, over the notion of innate ideas or tradition.
4 months, 4 weeks ago
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
Saved in
Absolutism- An absolute truth is always correct under any condition. An entity’s ability to discern these things is irrelevant to that state of truth. Universal facts can be discovered. It is opposed to relativism, which claims that there is not an unique truth.
4 months, 4 weeks ago
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
Saved in
HolismThe properties of a given system cannot be determined or explained by its parts alone. Instead, the system as a whole determines in an important way how the parts behave.
4 months, 4 weeks ago
Major Schools of Thought in Minimalist Geometric Graphics – Brain Pickings
Saved in
RelativismPoints of view have no absolute truth or validity, having only relative, subjective value according to differences in perception and consideration. Principles and ethics are regarded as applicable in only limited context.
4 months, 4 weeks ago
1
Can religion be based on ritual practice without belief?
Saved in
The cognitive science of religion

This approach offers the possibility of discovering universal commonalities among the many idiosyncracies in religious concepts, beliefs and practices found across history and culture. 

But unlike previous efforts, modern researchers largely eschew any attempt to provide a single monocausal explanation for religion, arguing that to do so is as meaningless as searching for a single explanation for art or science. 

These categories are just too broad for such an analysis. Instead, a scientific study of religion must begin by ‘fractionating’ the concept of religion, breaking down the category into specific features that can be individually explored and explained, such as the belief in moralistic High Gods or participation in collective rituals.

5 months ago
Opinion | Does Religion Make People Moral?
Saved in
Being religious does not make you a moral person

Religion can work in two fundamentally different ways:It can be a source of self-education, or it can be a source of self-glorification. Self-glorification can make people considerably less moral.

Trying to nurture moral virtues is one thing; assuming that you are already moral and virtuous simply because you identify with a particular religion is another. The latter turns religion into a tool for self-glorification.

A religion’s adherents assume themselves to be moral by default, and so they never bother to question themselves. At the same time, they look down on other people as misguided souls, if not wicked infidels.For such people, religion works not as cure for the soul, but as drug for the ego. It makes them not humble, but arrogant.

5 months ago
BBC - Religions - Taoism: Taoism at a glance
Saved in
Taoism at a glance
  • Taoism is about the Tao - the way the ultimate creative principle of the universe. 
  •  It is a religion of unity and opposites- Yin and Yang - principle that sees sees the world as filled with complementary forces - action and non-action, light and dark, hot and cold etc.
  • The Tao is not God and is not worshipped. Taoism includes many deities, that are worshipped in Taoist temples.
  • Taoism promotes: achieving harmony or union with nature, the pursuit of spiritual immortality, being 'virtuous' (but not ostentatiously so), self-development
  • Practices include:meditation, Feng shui, fortune telling,reading and chanting of scriptures.
5 months ago
1
Philosophical intuition: just what is ‘a priori’ justification?
Saved in
A priori justification=justification independent of experience

When you believe that 2 + 2 = 4, you are justified because you understand the concepts involved. You understand what all the terms in that simple sum mean and that, as a result, the sum of two and two is four. Philosophers call that sort of justification a priori justification, and describe it as justification independent of experience beyond what is required to possess the concepts involved in the proposition believed. A priori justification ultimately founds all of our justified beliefs.

5 months, 1 week ago
The Fairness Principle: How the Veil of Ignorance Helps Test Fairness
Saved in
The Fairness Principle

“The Fairness Principle: When contemplating a moral action, imagine that you do not know if you will be the moral doer or receiver, and when in doubt err on the side of the other person.” - Michael Shermer, The Moral Arc: How Science and Reason Lead Humanity Toward Truth, Justice, and Freedom

5 months, 1 week ago
The secret to a meaningful life is simpler than you think — Quartz
Saved in
Meaning is like an equation—add or subtract value variables, and you get more or less meaning.

If you feel purposeless because you’re not as accomplished in your profession as you dreamed of being, you could theoretically derive meaning from other endeavors, like relationships, volunteer work, travel, or creative activities, to name just a few. It may also be that the things you already do really are meaningful, and that you’re not valuing them sufficiently because you’re focused on a single factor for value. - Iddo Landau

5 months, 1 week ago
The secret to a meaningful life is simpler than you think — Quartz
Saved in

Those who think meaning can be discerned fall into these groups:

- Some are god-centered, that believe only a deity can provide purpose(1).

- Some ascribe to a soul-centered view, thinking something of us must continue beyond our lives, an essence after physical existence, which gives life meaning(2).

- Then there are two camps of “naturalists” seeking meaning in a purely physical world as known by science, who fall into “subjectivist”(3) and “objectivist” categories(4). The two naturalist camps are split over whether the human mind makes meaning or these conditions are absolute and universal. 

5 months, 1 week ago
The secret to a meaningful life is simpler than you think — Quartz
Saved in
People who feel purposeless misunderstand what meaning is

People are mistaken when they feel their lives are meaningless. The error is based on their failure to recognize what does matter, instead becoming overly focused on what they believe is missing from their existence.

5 months, 1 week ago
What is the difference between good and bad political rhetoric?
Saved in
Good rhetoric is not reducible to persuasive rhetoric. Persuasion might often be the goal of the rhetorician, but if rhetoric is to serve some civic good, it must serve the people on whom it operates. Plato was the first to observe that persuasion cannot in fact be the proper end of rhetoric, since it is an open question how it serves the interests of an audience to have their views influenced by a persuasive speech.
5 months, 2 weeks ago
What Plato knew about behavioural economics. (A lot)
Saved in
Socrates, in the Republic, compares philosophical enquiry to a hunt for an elusive quarry – discovering the truth about things is difficult, and simply trusting our first impressions and beliefs is a recipe for misapprehending the world. Only by rechecking arguments both for validity and soundness, and becoming acutely aware of our own susceptibility to certain forms of deception, are we likely to get closer to the truth.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
Too Busy to Pay Attention to Life
Saved in
According to Seneca, life is only as short as we choose to make it.


It is not that we have so little time but that we lose so much…the life we receive is not short but we make it so; we are not ill provided but use what we have wastefully. -Seneca

5 months, 3 weeks ago
The Science of “Intuition” – Brain Pickings
Saved in
There is no such thing as an intuitive person tout court. Intuition is a domain-specific ability
Intuition is a domain-specific ability, so that people can be very intuitive about one thing (say, medical practice, or chess playing) and just as clueless as the average person about pretty much everything else. Moreover, intuitions get better with practice — especially with a lot of practice — because at bottom intuition is about the brain’s ability to pick up on certain recurring patterns; the more we are exposed to a particular domain of activity the more familiar we become with the relevant patterns (medical charts, positions of chess pieces), and the more and faster our brains generate heuristic solutions to the problem we happen to be facing within that domain.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
Moral Outrage Is Self-Serving, Say Psychologists
Saved in
Expressed outrage on behalf of the victim of a perceived moral violation is often a function of self-interest
Feelings of guilt are a direct threat to one's sense that they are a moral person and, accordingly, research on guilt finds that this emotion elicits strategies aimed at alleviating guilt that do not always involve undoing one's actions. Furthermore, research shows that individuals respond to reminders of their group's moral culpability with feelings of outrage at third-party harm-doing. These findings suggest that feelings of moral outrage, long thought to be grounded solely in concerns with maintaining justice, may sometimes reflect efforts to maintain a moral identity.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
Understanding Jordan Peterson | Alastair's Adversaria
Saved in
Karl Jung's Archetypes

From the consistent appearance of the same set of mythological themes, symbols, images, thoughts, and ideas across cultures, times, and persons, Karl Jung inferred the existence of a ‘collective unconscious’ and its constituent ‘archetypes’. Which are predispositions to patterns of behaviour or modes of functioning, which can give rise to images, such as the Mother, Father, Death, Male and Female, Hero, etc.

Rather than being blank slates written upon by experience, a collective unconscious is present in each of us as a determinate psychic structure, evoked and activated by particular realities of our world. Despite the differences we see between cultures and persons, each of which is uniquely configured, we discover a remarkable imaginative commonality between them. This commonality involves archetypes, which are predispositions to patterns of behaviour or modes of functioning, which can give rise to images, such as the Mother, Father, Death, Male and Female, Hero, etc.

Religion functions at the deep level of the collective unconscious, presenting symbols that evoke and articulate these fundamental human responses, running far deeper than ideology, which may have a tenacious grip upon the conscious mind, yet has much less imaginative purchase at a more fundamental level of our psyche. In the study of religions, we can come to an understanding of the structure of human reality itself. Due to religion’s rootedness in the collective unconscious, we ought not be surprised by the frequently striking resemblances between religions, even those that have developed independently of each other.

6 months ago
3
The Best Decision You Will Make Before Making a Big Decision
Saved in
The risk of a wrong decision is preferable to the terror of indecision. — Maimonides
6 months ago
4
The rise and fall and rise of logic
Saved in
The logic of the Schools (scholastic logic) is not really a logic of discovery

After that, he should study logic. I do not mean the logic of the Schools, for this is strictly speaking nothing but a dialectic which teaches ways of expounding to others what one already knows or even of holding forth without judgment about things one does not know.Such logic corrupts good sense rather than increasing it.I mean instead the kind of logic which teaches us to direct our reason with a view to discovering the truths of which we are ignorant.- René Descartes, Principles of Philosophy

6 months, 1 week ago
What can Aristotle teach us about the routes to happiness?
Saved in
Modern self-help draws heavily on Stoic philosophy. But Aristotle was better at understanding real human happiness
One of the reasons why Stoicism is enjoying a revival today is that it gives concrete answers to moral questions. Aristotle’s ethical writings, however, contain few explicit instructions about how to act.The chief benefit that Aristotle can bestow on us today, which makes him so useful and practically applicable, is his alternative conception of ‘happiness’. It cannot be acquired by pleasurable experiences but only by identifying and realizing our own potential, moral and creative, in our specific environments, with our particular family, friends and colleagues, and helping others to do so. 
6 months, 1 week ago
Schopenhauer on Style – Brain Pickings
Saved in
Obscurity and vagueness of expression are at all times and everywhere a very bad sign. In ninety-nine cases out of a hundred they arise from vagueness of thought, which, in its turn, is almost always fundamentally discordant, inconsistent, and therefore wrong... A man who is capable of thinking can express himself at all times in clear, comprehensible, and unambiguous words. Those writers who construct difficult, obscure, involved, and ambiguous phrases most certainly do not rightly know what it is they wish to say: they have only a dull consciousness of it, which is still struggling to put itself into thought; they also often wish to conceal from themselves and other people that in reality they have nothing to say.- Arthur Schopenhauer
6 months, 1 week ago
Schopenhauer: On Reading and Books
Saved in

"Any kind of important book should immediately be read twice, partly because one grasps the matter in its entirety the second time, and only really understands the beginning when the end is known; and partly because in reading it the second time one’s temper and mood are different, so that one gets another impression; it may be that one sees the matter in another light."- Arthur Schopenhauer

6 months, 1 week ago
21 Profound Plato Quotes For Your Life Philosophy
Saved in
Excellence is not a gift, but a skill that takes practice.We do not act rightly because we are excellent, in fact we achieve excellence by acting rightly.” – Plato
6 months, 1 week ago
Timeless Wisdom on Character, Fortitude, Self-Control, and the Art of Living from Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius – Brain Pickings
Saved in

"The chief task in life is simply this:to identify and separate matters so that I can say clearly to myself which are externals not under my control, and which have to do with the choices I actually control.Where then do I look for good and evil? Not to uncontrollable externals, but within myself to the choices that are my own"  - Epictetus, Discourses, 2.5.4–5

6 months, 2 weeks ago
Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long – Brain Pickings
Saved in

No activity can be successfully pursued by an individual who is preoccupied … since the mind when distracted absorbs nothing deeply, but rejects everything which is, so to speak, crammed into it. Living is the least important activity of the preoccupied man; yet there is nothing which is harder to learn… Learning how to live takes a whole life, and, which may surprise you more, it takes a whole life to learn how to die. - Seneca

6 months, 2 weeks ago
Seneca on Grief and the Key to Resilience in the Face of Loss: An Extraordinary Letter to His Mother – Brain Pickings
Saved in
Grief is better confronted than resisted

"It is better to conquer our grief than to deceive it. For if it has withdrawn, being merely beguiled by pleasures and preoccupations, it starts up again and from its very respite gains force to savage us. But the grief that has been conquered by reason is calmed for ever. I am not therefore going to prescribe for you those remedies which I know many people have used, that you divert or cheer yourself by a long or pleasant journey abroad, or spend a lot of time carefully going through your accounts and administering your estate, or constantly be involved in some new activity. All those things help only for a short time; they do not cure grief but hinder it. But I would rather end it than distract it". - Seneca

6 months, 2 weeks ago
You Cannot Learn What You Think You Already Know
Saved in
“What is the first business of one who practices philosophy? To get rid of self-conceit. For it is impossible for anyone to begin to learn that which he thinks he already knows. -Epictetus, Discourses.
6 months, 2 weeks ago
Tolstoy on Knowledge and the Meaning of Life – Brain Pickings
Saved in

"Real wisdom is not the knowledge of everything, but the knowledge of which things in life are necessary, which are less necessary, and which are completely unnecessary to know. Among the most necessary knowledge is the knowledge of how to live well, that is, how to produce the least possible evil and the greatest goodness in one’s life. At present, people study useless sciences, but forget to study this, the most important knowledge" - Jean Jaques Rousseau

6 months, 2 weeks ago
23 Smart Ways To Increase Your Confidence, Productivity, and Income
Saved in

“Quality is not an act, it is a habit.” - Aristotle

6 months, 2 weeks ago
Why Wisdom Can’t Be Taught
Saved in
“I cannot teach anyone anything, I can only make them think.” - Socrates
6 months, 2 weeks ago
Deductive vs Inductive Reasoning: Make Smarter Arguments, Better Decisions, and Stronger Conclusions
Saved in
John Stuart Mill described five methods for identifying causes by noting regularities:
  • Direct method of agreement — If two instances of a phenomenon have a single circumstance in common, the circumstance is the cause or effect.
  • Method of difference — If a phenomenon occurs in one experiment and does not occur in another, and the experiments are the same except for one factor, that is the cause, part of the cause, or the effect.
  • Joint method of agreement and difference — If two instances of a phenomenon have one circumstance in common, and two instances in which it does not occur have nothing in common except the absence of that circumstance, then that circumstance is the cause, part of the cause, or the effect.
  • Method of residue — When you subtract any part of a phenomenon known to be caused by a certain antecedent, the remaining residue of the phenomenon is the effect of the remaining antecedents.
  • Method of concomitant variations — If a phenomenon varies when another phenomenon varies in a particular way, the two are connected.
  • 6 months, 2 weeks ago
    In Search of a Better World: Karl Popper on Truth vs. Certainty and the Dangers of Relativism – Brain Pickings
    Saved in
    Knowledge consists in the search for truth — the search for objectively true, explanatory theories.

    It is not the search for certainty. To err is human. All human knowledge is fallible and therefore uncertain.It follows that we must distinguish sharply between truth and certainty. That to err is human means not only that we must constantly struggle against error, but also that, even when we have taken the greatest care, we cannot be completely certain that we have not made a mistake. To combat the mistake, the error, means therefore to search for objective truth and to do everything possible to discover and eliminate falsehoods. This is the task of scientific activity. Hence we can say: our aim as scientists is objective truth; more truth, more interesting truth, more intelligible truth. We cannot reasonably aim at certainty.

    Since we can never know anything for sure, it is simply not worth searching for certainty; but it is well worth searching for truth; and we do this chiefly by searching for mistakes, so that we can correct them.  - Karl Popper

    6 months, 2 weeks ago
    Is there a fix for impostor syndrome?
    Saved in
    Breaking down the Impostor syndrome
  • The Expert. This manifests as a state of cringing denial when called an expert. There is a deep fear of being found out as not knowing everything in the area of work. This can lead to feeling like one doesn’t deserve the job one has.
  • The Perfectionist. Perfectionism underlies a feeling that one could have (and should have) done better.No matter how well the task was done, there is no accepting of compliments and no celebration of achievements. 
  • The Superwoman/man. Some people can’t stop working, taking on every task they can.  This kind of workaholism is the expression of a need for external validationand can be countered only by focusing on setting one’s own metrics for personal success.
  • The Natural Genius. This behavior involves judging one’s worth on the basis of raw ability as opposed to effort. Tendencies toward ridiculously high expectations are coupled with and amplified by the expectation that one will be successful on a first try—the perfect setup for feelings of inadequacy and failure, especially in complex domains.
  • The Rugged Individualist. Rugged individualism demands that all tasks be performed alone, and little to no help is sought. Projects are always framed in terms of their requirements, and personal needs are pushed aside in honor of project demands.
  • 6 months, 3 weeks ago
    1
    What the ‘Aikido’ philosophy teaches us about creativity and courage
    Saved in
    Never fear another challenger, no matter how large; Never despise another challenger, no matter how small. - Morihei Ueshiba
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    What the ‘Aikido’ philosophy teaches us about creativity and courage
    Saved in

    Progress comes to those who train and train; Reliance on secret techniques will get you nowhere - Morihei Ueshiba.

    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second, it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident. (Arthur Schopenhauer)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is wrong. (Thomas Jefferson)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so. (Mark Twain)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    A theory should not attempt to explain all the facts, because some of the facts are wrong.(Francis Crick)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    1
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts. (Arthur Conan Doyle)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in

    Never fall in love with your hypothesis. (Peter Medawar)

    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    1
    11 Rules for Critical Thinking
    Saved in
    Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. (Francis Bacon)
    6 months, 3 weeks ago
    29 Lessons From The Greatest Strategic Minds Who Ever Lived, Fought, Or Led
    Saved in
    Negative Visualization
    Stoics had a term—premeditatio malorumfor visualizing failure in advance. Why would they do that? 

    Because if you imagine failure you start seeing all the ways that have led to that result. And you can start actively working on addressing and mitigating them in advance.

    7 months ago
    4
    Finding the good – James Melcer – Medium
    Saved in

    In life our first job is this, to divide and distinguish things into two categories: externals I cannot control, but the choices I make with regard to them I do control. Where will I find good and bad? In me, in my choices.

    —Epictetus

    7 months ago
    Organize your knowledge ... with a Deepstash account
    Collect insights from all over the web & save them for your next project.
    Have an account?