Alexandra

@alexandrak354

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Passionate tv nerd and lifelong web junkie. I love sleeping. Sleeping is a science and I study it.

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Snacks are part of a healthy diet

Snacks keep us over till the next meal. Balanced snacks and meals at consistent times during the day keep your blood sugar stable and keep you from overeating.

Healthy snacking include protein, fibre, and other nutrients that will keep your blood sugar in an optimal range. In contrast, low blood sugar causes exhaustion and makes you crave sugary or fatty foods.

@alexandrak354

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Health

Keeping Your Brain Healthy
  • We can improve every aspect of our lives by keeping our most vital organ, our brain, healthy.
  • Exercise is not only good for your body but helps your brain by enhancing many brain structures and functions like the emotion regulating amygdala, and also the prefrontal cortex.
The basics to succeed in the gym:
  1. Commit to the long-term process.
  2. Don't treat exercise as something to do when it's convenient. 
  3. Great results come from great focus, not a great variety.
  4. Start light and train for volume before intensity.
  5.  Make SLOW progress each week.
  6. Record your workouts. What gets measured, gets managed.
  • The Ghrelin hormone is made in the stomach and released as the stomach empties.
  • Insulin-like peptide 5 is another hormone that stimulates hunger but is produced in the colon.
  • Cholecystokinin (CCK) is produced in the upper small bowel soon after food reaches it and gives a feeling of fullness.
  • Peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and uroguanylin make us feel full. They are made from the last part of the small bowel.
  • Leptin is an appetite-suppressing hormone and made in fat cells.
  • Amylin, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide are made in the pancreas.
Take Control Of Your Health

Heart disease and strokes are the number one cause of death worldwide. However, almost 80 percent of all cases of cardiovascular disease is preventable.

Making some changes to your lifestyle can lower the risk of heart disease.

Emotional eating

Emotional eating occurs in response to stress, and in people who restrict their food intake.

Eating sweet and fatty foods may improve mood temporarily by making us feel more energetic and happier, but when comfort food becomes a habit, it comes at a cost, such as weight gain.

  • Breathing fast can act as a trigger for people with anxiety causing symptoms that often accompany panic attacks, but you can use that to your advantage.
  • When you breathe fast and start to feel symptoms that you normally associate with anxiety, it may help you re-interpret those symptoms in a less threatening way.
  • They become less worrisome because they have a clear cause, the same way an elevated heart rate during exercise doesn’t bother us.
  • And if you can connect anxiety to faulty breathing habits, it means you can change the way you breathe and potentially see some improvement.
The 10 percent myth

A common myth is that humans only use 10 percent of their brainpower. About 65 percent of Americans believe this, according to a 2013 study. A 1998 study showed that a third of psychology majors, who focus on the brain, also believe this.

However, scientists have consistently shown that humans use their entire brain throughout the day.

Pushing yourself too hard

Pushing your body to reach new levels of fitness requires commitment and effort that are intense and challenging.

But without the right balance of rest and recovery you could end up with a long-term fatigue condition called overtraining syndrome.

Mindful Eating

Mindful eating is a mini-meditation that pulls us away from our distractions and multi-tasking to intentionally focus on something that we would want to relish.

Eating with intention, awareness and attention is called mindful eating. Eating what we love, like chocolate, can be made infinitely better by giving it one’s full attention.

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