Angela Z.

@angelazz492

369 READS

Friend of animals everywhere. Hardcore internet enthusiast and avid reader.

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Followers271

Following546

Stashing since Nov 11, 2020

25 Published

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103 Stashed Ideas

Common Errors While In The Company of Others
  1. Talking about yourself too much.
  2. Asking questions only for the sake of discovering secrets and expose someone else's mistakes.
  3. Telling a scripted story and being oblivious to the fact that other people don't care or being aware that others don't care, but still continues to tell the story.
  4. Seeing a conversation as a possible chance to debate or fight. It makes other people walk on eggshells in order to avoid disputes.
  5. Mocking someone for their misfortunes, defects, and deformities of any kind.

@angelazz492

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Communication

Assertiveness

Assertiveness is behaving in one's own best interests, standing up for oneself without being anxious or guilty, expressing one's honest feelings comfortably, and exercising one's right without denying others theirs.

Practice assertiveness by being firm and demanding yet soft, direct and respectful.

Stories are powerful tools

The ability to create stories helps people to cooperate and move forward. Stories have multiple advantages: They allow us to discern complex situations, remember ideas, communicate with others, and make predictions about the future.

It is vital for managers and entrepreneurs to use these benefits and improve their storytelling skills. But stories can also be misleading. It is crucial to recognise the different ways stories can deceive you.

Raising your voice

Most of the meaning of your spoken words comes from the tone of your voice, not from the words.

Suppose you are the type of person who automatically raises your voice to become the dominant speaker. In that case, you may be damaging your ability to be a better communicator and secure cooperation.

There is a subconscious control going on almost all the time in our behaviour, on how others perceive us, something which is called social dramaturgy.

This behaviour would not be acceptable or palpable for others, if they didn’t participate in this in social environments, resulting in a set of protocols that is agreed upon by all.

  • People think emotionally, so forget facts
  • When people are asked to explain their beliefs about how a given thing works, they’ll actually become less confident in those beliefs.
  • When people have their self-worth validated in some way, they tend to be more receptive to information that challenges their beliefs.
  • During a debate, you’re more likely to make progress if you can appeal to the moral concerns of the people that you’re talking with.
Build deeper friendships
  • Evaluate your relationships and find out which friendships need a deeper connection.
  • Make plans that encourage conversation like going to an art exhibit, taking a class, or cooking together.
  • Don't shy away from difficult emotional subjects.
  • Create time to be supportive of them. Deeper relationships take more time and effort to maintain.
Winning an Argument

The odds of winning an argument require more than just logic and rationality, as there are a lot of other factors involved.

By understanding and changing the 'frames' a person uses and center them around a shared belief, we can help our cause.

Sarcasm is like a truth-lie

You say something you don't literally mean, and the hearer only understands if they get that you're insincere. The ability to recognize sarcasm is an essential skill to function in a modern society that thrives on irony.

Entire phrases have lost their literal meaning because they are so frequently used with a sneer. For example, "big deal", or "tell it to someone who cares," and "aren't you special" means you aren't.

E-mail rudeness is a pervasive problem

Studies show that more than ninety percent of professionals surveyed admitted that they had experienced disrespectful e-mails at work.

Rude e-mails are on the rise. The e-mail may be written entirely in capital letters or contain exclamation marks equivalent to shouting across the office.

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