Antonio V. (@antoniov502) - Profile Photo

Antonio V.

@antoniov502

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"Try not to be a man of success, but a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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Networked thinking

This is an explorative approach to problem-solving, whose aim is to consider the complex interactions between nodes and connections in a given problem space.

Instead of considering a particular problem in isolation to discover a pre-existing solution, networked thinking encourages non-linear, second-order reflection in order to let a new idea emerge.

Thinking in networks can be done at an individual level, but the power of networked thinking becomes apparent in a collaborative setting.

Antonio V. (@antoniov502) - Profile Photo

@antoniov502

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Problem Solving

What Intelligence Is

Intelligence is a mechanism to solve problems (especially the ones related to survival). It includes the ability to gather knowledge, to learn, to be creative, to form strategies, or think critically.

It manifests itself in a huge variety of behaviors.

Good Questions Bad Questions

Children are naturally inquisitive, but as they turn into adults, the frequency of asking questions slowly diminishes. They crystallize their understanding of the world and let things be as they are, not disturbing the status quo.

The lost art of asking good, challenging questions is essential in this world. Some questions are innocuous and simple, but there are other types of queries asked by curious minds which may not be appropriate to many people.

The Cornell Method

Divide your paper into three sections: a 2.5” margin to the left, a 2” summary section on the bottom, and a main 6” section.

  • The main 6" section is used for note-taking during class.
  • The 2.5" margin to the left is the cues section. Use this space to write down ideas you'll need to remember. Add a prompt for each. Include vocabulary words and study questions here.
  • The 2" summary section at the bottom is where you'll highlight the main points.

The advantages of this method are notes that are neatly organized and summarized.

Genius is not tied to age

Genius is tied up with precocity. We think brilliance requires youth and energy and freshness. Mozart wrote his breakthrough Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-Flat-Major at the age of twenty-one. T.S. Eliot wrote "The Love Song of J.Alfred Prufrock" at the age of twenty-three

Economist David Galenson decided to find out whether the assumption is true that creativity, when discovered early, burns brightly, and then die out at an early age. He found that is what not so. Some are late bloomers. Mark Twain published "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" at forty-nine. Daniel Defoe wrote "Robinson Crusoe" at fifty-eight.

The Pareto Efficiency idea refers to situations where you can (or can't) improve something without trade-offs.

For example, consider designing a car where you aim for speed and safety. Pareto efficiency is to find a design that allows you to get more speed or safety without getting less of the other.

Default choices

90% of your daily decisions happen automatically, many shaped by your environment. Thus, most decisions are a habit, not a deliberate choice.

To make smarter choices, design smarter defaults. And habits can be developed by shaping the invisible defaults of your life.

Viktor Frankl
"It doesn’t really matter what we expected from life, but what life expected from us."

When the mind is only working in a linguistic mode, doodling provides a visual medium to support mind processing, providing it with neurological access.

The natural doodles that we can indulge to enhance our visual language:

  1. Atomization: drawing the word and its elements.
  2. Game-storming: Fusing two random drawings together.
  3. Process map: Make a flowchart or visual diagram to illustrate a process or sequence.
We are exposed to biases that influence our ability to make good decisions.
  • We are quick to jump to conclusions because we fail to search for information that might disprove our thoughts.
  • We're overconfident. We look for information that fits our ideas and ignore information that doesn't.

Knowing these and other biases is not enough. We need a framework for making decisions.

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