Colin I. (@colinii53) - Profile Photo

Colin I.

@colinii53

390 READS

A lot of problems would disappear if we talked to each other more than talking about each other.

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Nov 11, 2020

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Companies are leveraging data and artificial intelligence to create scalable solutions — but they’re also scaling their reputational, regulatory, and legal risks. 

  • Los Angeles is suing IBM for allegedly misappropriating data it collected with its ubiquitous weather app.
  • Optum is being investigated by regulators for creating an algorithm that allegedly recommended that doctors and nurses pay more attention to white patients than to sicker black patients.
  • Goldman Sachs is being investigated by regulators for using an AI algorithm that allegedly discriminated against women by granting larger credit limits to men than women on their Apple cards.
  • Facebook infamously granted Cambridge Analytica, a political firm, access to the personal data of more than 50 million users.
Colin I. (@colinii53) - Profile Photo

@colinii53

🧐

Problem Solving

Creativity In Isolation

For many people in creative professions, a lack of stimulus and isolation hampers work. Yet for some, a lockdown and being completely alone with oneself is a boon for real creativity.

Such contradiction makes understanding creativity hard, but the two main factors for creative thinking are openness to new experiences and being comfortable with one’s own thoughts and inner voice.

To enter the flow state
  • An activity must have a clear set of goals and progress.
  • A task must have clear and immediate feedback.
  • There must be a good balance between the perceived challenge of the task and the individual's own perceived skills.

When starting a project that requires time, energy and resources, the cost-benefit ratio is a good rule for deciding if the plunge is worth it.

One has to think about the risk in terms of probability, while also keeping in mind what is at stake: Will the effort, time, money and resources that are spent will go down the drain or will all of it still provide value in case the primary goal is not reached.

Problems with how we view scientific studies

The world is full of evidence and studies, some good and some poor.

  • One major problem is that scientific lingo often means something different from everyday language. Words like theory, significant, and control have entirely different meanings in the realm of science.
  • Another problem is that experiments can suffer from problems in how they're designed, how they're analysed, and how scientific journals review them.

There is a community of critics and tweakers and tinkerers that are ready to criticize the logo your agency put together. What is scarce are the people willing to make the logo themselves.

Here is then a clue about what to do next: Go first. After you have done the scary bits, you can easily get help from the people who are good at smoothing out the rough places with their critiques.

How to embrace an uncertain future
  • Replace expectations with plans. You can guide your tomorrow, but you can’t control the exact outcome.
  • Prepare for different possibilities.
  • Become a feeling observer. It isn’t the uncertainty that usually bothers you; it’s the tendency to get lost in your feelings about it.
  • Get confident about your coping and adapting skills. Ask yourself, “What’s the worst that can happen?”
  • Practice mindfulness. Notice and appreciate the beauty of the moment.
Thinking or Doing
We have a ‘thinking’ system and a ‘doing’ system – and we’re generally only capable of using one at a time.
  • Thinking requires Diverging(trying to come up with as many ideas as possible).
  • Doing requires Converging (evaluating ideas and figure out which ones are best).
The natural preferences of our brain

In a perfect world, we would use both success and failure as instructive lessons. But our brain doesn't learn that way. It learns more from some experiences than others.

Confirmation bias makes us prefer outcomes that we agree with, and a positivity bias causes us to focus on rewards more than punishments. New studies get to the bottom of these biases to find a role for choice.

Parents have more power and choices in educating their children than they realize.

Many parents are concerned about the changing world and uncertain futures their children face. They are anxious about education, a narrow curriculum, that schools are not cultivating curiosity. They worry about their children being medicated for "learning problems." However, many educators share the same concerns and are campaigning for change.

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