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Elena X.

@elenxx444

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Motivational intensity

An individual's motivational intensity is how strongly they are compelled in approaching or avoiding certain things.

It is an important variable that affects the scope of attention because an individual can experience "pleasantness" and have low motivational states - they're not really determined to pursue anything; however, those who have "desire" have higher motivational states thus are more focused on completing a specific goal.

@elenxx444

The Emotions That Make Us More Creative

hbr.org

  • Creative people have messy minds, and have learned to embrace the messiness of the creative process;
  • They are people who can easily adapt to their surroundings;
  • They have the ability to mix seemingly incompatible states of being such as having open attention with a focused drive or even intense rebelliousness but still has respect for tradition;
  • The way their lives are lived with differing passion and intensity, and the depth of human experience is what makes creative people, creative.

This is the degree to which people are open to experiencing the full range and depth of their feelings. It also forecasts creative imagination better than intellectual engagement or IQ.

Situations that increase emotional ambivalence:

  • Being placed in higher-status positions; and
  • Engaging in organizational recruitment and socialization

A person stuck in an unusual environment can show increased levels of creative thinking, and the fact of the matter is that creativity is the experience of unusual and unexpected events. So if you want to increase creativity, ask yourself if your current environment brings out emotional ambivalence and motivational intensity or not.

Emotional ambivalence is the event where we simultaneously experience positive and negative emotions.

Pure happiness and pure sadness rarely occur to us but we do, however, tend to experience mixed emotions.

Being able to simultaneously experience emotions that are often not experienced together may cause increased sensitivity, which is an important contributor to creativity.

What common job listings can reveal

Before you apply for a job, you probably first read a listing that includes vague statements like "We are seeking a self-starter who can work well under pressure in a fast-paced environment."

These common job listing phrases can reveal a lot about the company's priorities, the ideal job candidate, and who will fit in the organization's culture.

How To Decode 10 Of The Most Common Phrases In Job Listings

huffpost.com

This does not mean you have to be genuinely enthusiastic about the industry, but you need to come prepared for an interview to show your expertise in the subject. 

These titles can mean there's a certain level of expertise and expectation that you will know what you're doing.

But it can also be an indication that the company does not know what they want.

This can be code for a heavy workload. It means things are always busy, so you need to work quickly because it's time-sensitive.

Your job may be in jeopardy if you can't keep up.

This is a popular listing in startups since leaders are still working on the details. "Self-starter" could mean you'll be given little training and have to come up with your own ideas. It could be a red flag for someone relatively new to the field, but it's ideal for a leader who has similar experience and can execute ideas with little direction.

If a company asks for a self-starter, back up your application by sharing the times you initiated a process or took the lead.

These are subjective requirements, and you may need to ask for clarity. One way is to ask, “How was the person that I’m replacing expected to be flexible?”

An agile candidate means you need to be ready to drop something mid-project and do something else.

The thinking is that you don't need to be micromanaged, so you can decide how much time off you take. But the lack of clear structure means workers inevitably end up taking less time off.

An employee may feel bad about taking a vacation. There could also be a cultural expectation that you don't take long breaks. Ask someone in the know how many days people take off.

This phrase doesn't mean you can't negotiate your pay. If you're considered at the higher range of salary, you should stand firm on your value.

To know what they mean by a competitive salary, ask what the range is during the interview process.

"Wears many hats" means you will likely be asked to do things outside of your job duties. "And other duties as assigned" may appear elsewhere in the posting.

Candidates who appreciate the structure of a predetermined set of responsibilities should consider this a red flag. Ask a clarifying question in the interview process such as "How much time, in terms of percentage, do you envision me doing this part of the work?"

This phrase could mean that you will be put under lots of projects and deadlines that will not be realistic. Most people will leave in one or two years.

To succeed in this environment, you'll need to accept imperfection. You will produce mediocre-level stuff and should be OK with it.

A common interview question is "Tell me about a time you had to pivot your strategy." It can also be any question that asks you to discuss how you troubleshoot.

When you see this request, try to anticipate what problems this role will have and describe how you would handle them.

Apocalypse Now: Aqua Edition

Sea-level rise and eventual flooding is a growing possibility that has been written in many ancient books and stories.

The Noah’s Ark, the Sumerian flood, or the ancient Hindu story of Manu and Matsya depicted an Apocalyptic water crisis thousands of years ago and had a common theme: The Wrath Of God.

Sea-level rise: writers imagined drowned worlds for centuries – what they tell us about the future

theconversation.com

The ancient stories and the many modern thought experiments envision a world drowned in water and the resulting problems that aren’t talked about at all.

The sea-level rising is a global warming threat that seems like ‘climate fiction’ to the people in charge and could be a potential disaster if not taken seriously now.

How We Copy The Choices Of Others

While eating out, shopping, or during a donation drive, some of us make choices that we wouldn’t normally make.

Studies on consumer behaviour show that while some would mimic or copy the behaviour of the person they observe, some would choose to do the exact opposite.

'I'll have what she's having' – how and why we copy the choices of others

theconversation.com

Our choices become influenced by society, and this creates a vicious circle where what is being done by the other person is seen as appropriate to others.

Extensive studies show people replicate parts of behaviour in a social setting while showing their own preference towards some aspects of the decision. Example: While opting to donate in charitable institutions, people would match the amount but choose a charity of their own preference.

Resilience During A Global Crisis
  • Resilience is the ability to handle and recover from stressful situations and crises. It is not simply coping up with adversity, but to experience growth and flowering, finding meaning and purpose, experiencing self-awareness and tasting life in all its flavours.
  • The ongoing pandemic has now made the knowledge of ‘resilience’ required reading. Adversity can strike anytime to anyone, and most of us have experienced anxiety, worry, disappointment, shame, grief, frustration, or sadness.

How to be resilient | Psyche Guides

psyche.co

  1. Resilience comes automatically to most of us.
  2. It is part of a set of skills and behaviours and not a standalone concept.
  3. Resilience is not an individual trait or quality, but dependent on many contextual factors like one’s upbringing, social factors and health conditions.
  4. It is not a static concept but a flowing, dynamic process based on our life cycle and external conditions.
  5. Resilience does not make a person a superhuman being, and the journey of suffering, misery and pain has to be undertaken.
  6. Positivity is one-sided, and running away from negativity does not build resilience.
  1. Don’t isolate yourself, but connect with others, and nurture your relationships. One can reach out to others, play and have fun by joining online or offline groups, or while going for a morning walk. One need not wait for a pandemic.
  2. Accept what is happening to you(and others) and allow it to exist, while taking affirmative action towards stuff that is in your control.
  3. Don’t avoid discomfort, but move towards it occasionally. It’s not always about comfort and convenience.
  4. Distance yourself from your thoughts by practicing gratitude journaling, or simply writing on paper what is on your mind.
  5. Find growth opportunities in adverse situations by reframing them as a new challenge, something known as Cognitive Reframing.
Positive and destructive perfectionism

Constructive or healthy perfectionism is a personality trait that is associated with finding enjoyment and fulfilment from doing things well. The focus is process-oriented, where you learn from your mistakes.

A darker side of perfectionism is a self-destructive and addictive belief system where the person thinks a perfect life can prevent or minimize the painful feelings of shame, judgment and blame. This form of perfectionism involves trying to constantly meet perceived expectations of what 'perfect' is.

How to get over ‘never good enough’ | Psyche Guides

psyche.co

A possible explanation of why people develop unhealthy perfectionism is that they grow up without a sense of support, safety, and nurturing. Another reason can be a reaction to childhood trauma or extreme cultural expectations, where appearing perfect is a strategy for survival.

The consequence of destructive perfectionism is often deep-seated emotional difficulties and unresolved traumatic experiences that might eventually turn into a potentially severe depression.

  1. Your perfectionism is fueled by a constant, critical inner voice of intense shame or fear.
  2. You demonstrate an excessive sense of responsibility and look for solutions.
  3. You are unable to accept and express painful emotions.
  4. You dismiss or discount abuse or trauma.
  5. You worry a lot and avoid situations where you're not in control.
  6. You are highly focused on tasks and expectations and validate yourself with your accomplishments.
  7. You have an active and sincere concern for the wellbeing of others, while seldom allowing anyone into your inner world.
  8. You feel you have to acknowledge your gratitude.
  9. You have emotional difficulty with personal intimacy.
  10. You might have anxiety and control issues, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), panic and eating disorders.

If you believe you are an unhealthy perfectionist and that it could be masking your own deep-rooted emotional problems, the following stages can benefit you.

  • Consciousness: Becoming aware that your perfectionism is a problem.
  • Commitment: Change the goal of commitment to that of intention.
  • Confrontation: Confronting your personal beliefs.
  • Connection: Connecting with feelings you've long suppressed.
  • Change: Changing your behaviour.

Becoming aware of your perfectionism can be very complicated because you've convinced yourself that your perfectionist traits are normal and not a problem. It is good to understand that not everyone is like this.

An exercise to develop more insight into the role that destructive perfectionism plays is mindfulness. Sit somewhere comfortable and set a timer for five minutes. Breathe deeply and close your eyes. Stay focused on your breath. If your mind wanders, gently let go of those thoughts and refocus on your breath. When the timer goes off, check your emotions, such as irritation, relief, feeling foolish. Simply notice and watch them dissipate.

  1. Adopting such a rigid commitment that if you fail, you'll quit.
  2. Beginning with a goal that's too hard or too big.
  3. Going at your goal alone without accepting help.
  4. Dealing with the fear and shame of giving up your persona.
  5. Worsening mental difficulties such as OCD or an eating disorder.

The first two potential stumbling blocks can be mastered by changing the goal of commitment to that of intention. The third stumbling block can be conquered by reflecting on the instances where it would have been good to ask for help and considering scenarios with what you could've said or done. Journaling is the best way to overcome the fourth stumbling block. The fifth block is a reminder that you might need to put this work of halt for a time while attending to anxiety or another disorder.

Rules and beliefs interact. Your beliefs are something you accept to be true. Your rules govern your behaviour. Your rules can limit or expand your beliefs.

Confronting your personal beliefs is about identifying the rules you live by, then considering if they are still rules you want to follow. If a rule doesn't serve you well, write one out that could replace it.

You might be more aware of your own vulnerability and tendency to withdraw. However, if you don't connect with and process your emotional hurt, anger or sadness, they will govern your life.

In a supportive environment, create a timeline, then write 2, 4, 8, 12, 20, etc., on your timeline. Fill in both the good and hurtful things that occurred to you. The goal is to acknowledge the good and the bad. Connecting with pain teaches that you can tolerate it and that your vulnerabilities don't define you.

Seeing the positive results from the efforts you are making in dealing with destructive perfectionism will give you hope.

Go through the ten traits associated with perfectionism-fuelled depression, and with support from friends or family, think about specific ways you can risk behaviour change. Every small change is a win and worthy of celebration.

Procrastination

Procrastination is one habit that most of us have. We tend to delay finishing a task or a project not because we are lazy but because we have negative emotions surrounding the task - boredom, anxiety, depression, and more.

It is a chronic cycle that rewards our present self with a feeling of momentarily relief which could only lead to us procrastinating more often than needed.

When Are You Procrastinating? And Is It Bad For You? - Darius Foroux

dariusforoux.com

The topic of procrastination is highly debated.

Many arguments revolve around the fact that procrastinating is linked to depression, low-self esteem, or anxiety. This may be true, but the Zeigarnik Effect may prove something entirely different; it argues that an interruption during a task that requires focus can improve a person's ability to remember it afterwards.

Everyone procrastinates when there is resistance. Your job is to remove the resistance so you can get things done and move on.

If you had a gym membership at a gym which was 20 minutes away from your place and you rarely ever visit the area, would you be encouraged to go? No. So, instead, sign up to a gym near your place that is on route to your office or the market.

In a public situation, we present a different version of ourselves than from the one at home. Every profession has unspoken agreements about which manners are acceptable, and which are not.

It is then the purpose of the persona to suppress the impulses and emotions that are not considered socially acceptable. The difficulty is when one becomes so identified with his persona that he loses all sense of self. The result is an inflated persona with excessive concern for what people think and a lack of courage to endure conflict and refuse others' wishes.

4 Carl Jung Theories Explained: Persona, Shadow, Anima/Animus, The Self

medium.com

The 'shadow self' is everything a person has denied in themselves, such as spontaneity, aggression, cowardice, carelessness, passion, enthusiasm. It embraces all the thoughts and moods for which we feel guilt and shame.

The shadow is emotional, for it must oppose the rigidness of the ego. It is prone to psychological projection, where we attribute to others the inferior qualities we do not want to admit are in ourselves. When we perceive a moral deficiency in others, we can be sure there is similar inferiority within ourselves. If we take note of our resentment towards ourselves and others, we have the opportunity to bring the shadow into consciousness.

  • Jung believed that inside the shadow are the qualities of our opposite gender. The anima expresses the feminine qualities within a man, and the animus indicates the masculine qualities within women.
  • Jung presented the concepts of the anima and animus as the archetypes of Eros and Logos. Eros (the female) is identified with receptivity, creativity, relationships, and wholeness. Logos (the male) is associated with power, thought, and action.
  • The archetypes of the anima/animus have their own autonomy, and are independent from our conscious mind.
Carl Jung's Archetypes

In the psychology of Carl Jung, the archetypes represent universal patterns and images that are part of the collective unconscious.
The four main archetypes described by Jung are:

  • The Persona
  • The Shadow
  • The Anima/Animus
  • The Self.

The self is the sum of everything we are now, everything we once were, and everything we could potentially become.

The archetype of the self is the start of our impulse toward self-realization. Carl Jung believed the end purpose of human life is to experience this coming together of the whole.

The present moment is precious
  • In order to do it justice, we simply need to focus on it. The present is right here in front of you. Relish it.
  • We often stay distracted and multitask our chores, like eating while driving, sucking the joy out of our meals and the drive.
  • Connect with your loved ones, and breathe in the existence, the surroundings, reaping all the gifts that the present moment provides you with.

When Your Worries Start To Snowball, Do These 5 Things

thoughtcatalog.com

We all have lots to do, as our work, friends, family, home, and social obligations and endless plans keep us running. Thinking about all of the load at once will make you feel defeated.

Don’t tell yourself there’s this huge amount of things you have to do right now. No, there’s one thing, and then another. Make a list of your high-priority tasks and get the important ones done, feeling a sense of accomplishment. If you don’t finish all the tasks today, that’s absolutely fine.

Worrying about things that might happen, makes us waste our precious energy and time. The limited thought cycles get jammed with ‘pre-worry’.

You have all the time to worry about the problem and handle it when (and if) it happens. Pre-worry isn’t doing you any good.

There are things that we can’t do anything about, and that’s life, a game of luck and skill. The skill( and decision part) you can control, along with how you feel about it.

Things like losing one’s job, or having a family member who is sick, are out of our control, and it is no use draining our energy worrying about it. You need to focus on things you can control, like your attitude towards adversity.

  • We take many things offered to us by life for granted. An active, healthy body, a home, good food to eat, a loving family, even the gas in the tank.
  • Anything that puts a smile on our face is a true blessing, but we only focus on what we haven’t got, or the negative aspects of people, events and circumstances.
  • We must be thankful for what we have in our lives, and count our blessings as we pay attention to the present moment.
Experiencing Rejection

For entrepreneurs, the word ‘Yes’ is an exception, not the rule. The small business landscape, where new startups are coming and going, it is common to hear rejection, with investors not interested in your product/service, or a potential customer shunning your product.

But when our goals and dreams are at stake, hearing the word ‘no’ actually hurts.

How to Deal With Rejection: A Science-Based Approach

inc.com

Coping With Rejection

Sticking to your commitment and progress even in the face of rejection is a good way to cope up with rejection, even if one has to blame the other party.

Blaming is not a good option, but it serves the purpose if we absorb the lesson and continue trying.

Just remember that failure in one area of life does not reflect your overall self-worth and value.

You have a lot going on. If the other person said ‘no’ to your proposal, or you got rejected in that interview, it is not the end of the world, just an obstacle that is providing you with valuable lessons.

Sometimes we move too quickly from our rejections as if the door is suddenly permanently closed. We need to not take rejection at face value right at the first go and show that we are not made of clay.

Sometimes, there can be a lack of understanding between the recruiter and the candidate, and the problem can be addressed by nudging for a reconsideration.

The best way to face rejection is to succeed! Success provides you with the confidence that you are worthy and can take the occasional ‘no’, like all successful people. Improving yourself by gaining skills increases your confidence. Celebrating your small successes adds weight to it.

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