Emersyn Z.

@eme_gz71

227 READS

We spend most of our time with work teammates. It makes sense to be better teammates ourselves. I read and stash about that.

Followers134

Following41

Stashing since Nov 11, 2020

17 Published

2 Stashes

79 Stashed Ideas

People want engagement and focus in their meetings

However, meetings are often frustrating. Most of the time, the same people who do all the talking. They often derail the meeting and make it take longer than planned.

Similarly, it's always the same people who are quiet, and there is a concern that the lack of engagement will affect good team commitments.

@eme_gz71

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Career

Givers and takers

Employees can decide whether to act like givers or takers.

  • When they act like givers, they contribute without looking for anything in turn, such as offering assistance, sharing knowledge, or making valuable introductions.
  • When they act as takers, they try to get other people to serve their ends while hoarding their expertise and time.

Studies found a strong link between employee giving and desirable business outcomes, such as higher profitability, productivity, efficiency, and customer satisfaction.

Effective team building contains two things:

  • A change of scenery, which makes the activity seem like a break from the normal day.
  • A demonstration that your employer really cares about your wellbeing.

Virtual team-building fails at both because it is nearly impossible to provide specialized attention on a group video call. And if you're attending a team-building video chat from your home office, it won't feel like a change of environment.

Connectional intelligence

The ability to drive innovation and breakthrough results by tackling the power of relationships and networks.

It recognizes that leaps in creativity and progress cannot be achieved in solitude. They require forming relationships, wielding influence well, and sharing a vision so compelling that others adopt it as their own.

Trust in the age of remote work

Different industries may face different challenges when they have to manage staff remotely. However, they all share one element that is crucial: trust.

A lack of trust can undo a team. Managers may doubt that their reports are actually working. This can lead to the expectation that employees are always available, creating stress and disrupting employees' work-life balance. The secret in learning to trust remote employees is ensuring good communication.

You may think it was your idea to keep your desk neat or speak up in a meeting, but your behavior was likely influenced by those in your network.

Once we understand social networks, we can use its power to shape workplaces for the better. You can turn an unhappy team into an innovative, collaborative one.

Getting into remote working

Workers around the globe have been forced to take on the promise and challenges of virtual teamwork.

Many people are more used to working in person and haven't had the opportunity to prepare for a productive virtual working culture. Getting into a rhythm of remote working with a team can be challenging, especially with many different personalities and aptitudes.

Introducing People

People no longer have the option to introduce themselves to new people at their convenience (like in an office setting, for example). With the remote setting, the second someone joins an online meeting, they’re exposed in front of dozens of new faces staring straight at them. It's easy to feel awkward. More so if they are ignored, or not properly introduced.

So make sure to introduce everyone individually to the group. And if not everyone on the call knows each other, make the time for short ice-breaking sessions for everyone to introduce themselves.

When given the chance to meet new people, make sure you do it. As you never know when somebody might prove useful, why not being sociable and trying to broaden as much as possible your circle?

  • Attendees often multi-task and don't pay attention to the discussion.
  • Meeting organizers tend to be less careful with the purpose and design of the conversation.
  • Usually, one or two attendees to dominate the discussion while others sit back.
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