George I. (@george_ii20) - Profile Photo

George I.

@george_ii20

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Never give up. Always find a reason to keep trying.

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Optimism Bias

Looking at the bright side of life, and putting more weight on the likelihood of positive events happening around us is known as Optimism Bias.

The two beliefs that form this bias are:

  1. A belief that we possess a greater amount of positive traits than others.
  2. A belief to have some kind of control over the world around us.
George I. (@george_ii20) - Profile Photo

@george_ii20

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Problem Solving

Aristotle
the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing th

At some point, you'll need to consider which data source and analytical strategy are most likely to give the answers you need.

  • Consider whether your question would be best addressed by qualitative data (interviews, observations, or historical records), quantitative data (surveys or census records) or a combination of both.
  • You might need to collect your own data, or it might be available in an existing database.

The point is to plan research, not to conduct it. The purpose of this step is to think through a feasible approach to answering your research question. You might reevaluate and revise while planning your project as new and unexpected avenues are revealed.

Famous Eureka Moments

The falling apple has caused physicist Isaac Newton to formulate his laws of gravity. Archimedes took a bath and figured out how to calculate volume and density.

Anna Marie Roos, a historian of science, advises us to take these eureka moments with a grain of salt. However, she thinks they give insight into the creative process.

  1. Making impromptu decisions. Take the time to think about the pros and cons of your decision and weigh out the consequences.
  2. Lacking peace.  Take deep breaths in a quiet environment to evaluate the facts before you decide.
  3. Wallowing in the chaos of everyday life, or listening to too many other people. 
  4. Not considering priorities. Make a list of your important priorities. It will help you to make better choices.
  5. Deciding things without thought to our needs and wants.
  6. Neglecting your values. 
  7. Making decisions that are not right today, but we think they will be in the long run.
  8. Saying things to please others, or avoid saying something that will hurt.
  9. Forgetting how to say “no.” We think we need to be all things to all people.  Step back so that others can step forward.
  10. Procrastinating. Once you’ve made a decision, own it. Doing so is key to living with it.
We all make bad decisions

While we may not like to admit this, we all are making a lot of bad decisions, be it our personal lives, careers or in our jobs. Here is what research says about making good decisions:

  • You need the right information, not more of it.
  • Feelings can be utilized
  • Know your strengths
  • Make a 'good enough' decision
Self-Education: The Way Of The Future

Self-learning (also known as autodidacticism) is useful for certification (and fine-tuning) of your existing skills, to be able to learn continuously, and for the cultivation of your curiosity.

It’s essential to move out of the comfort zone and dive into the learning zone.

Metacognition

It is the awareness and understanding of your own thought processes. Metacognition refers to the processes used in self-regulation, self-monitoring, and self-reflection. People who practice metacognition can think more critically, rationally, and productively.

Without this ability to distance ourselves from our experience, we would have little ability to moderate and direct our behaviors as they happen.

Paradigm Theory

A Paradigm theory is a general theory that provides a broad theoretical framework or "conceptual scheme." It offers underlying assumptions, key concepts, and methodology to scientists working in a particular field. It gives their research its general direction and goals.

Examples of paradigm theories include Copernicus' heliocentric astronomy (with the sun at the center), Isaac Newton's theory of gravity, Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, germ theory in medicine, gene theory in biology.

Gambler’s Fallacy

The odds are always fifty-fifty. But most of us anticipate better odds, or better luck, after a bad streak, as if now we are due for good luck.

This ‘Gambler’s Fallacy’ assumes that probability as a whole has memory, and if the coin is flipped ten times and shows ‘heads’ in all ten, the odds are huge for it showing ‘tails’ in the 11th spin.

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