deepstash

Beta

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress Kit
profile-photo

James E.

@jam_iee52

96

Following

171

Followers

384

Ideas read

106

Stashed ideas

23

Published articles

LAST PUBLISHED

Overthinkers

Chronic overthinkers rehash conversations they had yesterday, second-guess every decision they make and imagine disastrous outcomes all day every day.

Thinking too much prevents them from getting anything done. And it wreaks havoc on their mood.

@jam_iee52

6 Ways to Stop Overthinking Everything

inc.com

Overthinking often involves two destructive thought patterns--ruminating and incessant worrying.

  • Ruminating involves dwelling on the past. "I should have stayed at my last job. I would be happier than I am now.""My parents didn't teach me how to be confident. My insecurities have always held me back."
  • Persistent worrying involves negative predictions about the future. "I'm going to embarrass myself tomorrow when I give that presentation. I know I'm going to forget everything I'm supposed to say."

Overthinking can become such a habit that you don't even recognize when you're doing it. Practice paying attention.

When you're overthinking past or future events, acknowledge that your thoughts aren't productive. Thinking is only helpful when it leads to positive action.

  • If the problem is something you have some control over, consider how you can prevent the problem or challenge yourself to identify five potential solutions.
  • If it's something you have no control over--like a natural disaster--think about the strategies you can use to cope with it. Focus on the things you can control, like your attitude and effort.
Challenge your thoughts

Remember that your emotions will interfere with your ability to look at situations objectively. 

Take a step back and look at the evidence. What evidence do you have that your thought is true? What evidence do you have that your thought isn't true?

Incorporate 20 minutes of "thinking time" into your daily schedule. During that time period let yourself worry, ruminate, or mull over whatever you want. When your time is up, move onto something else. 
When you start overthinking things outside of your scheduled thinking time, simply remind yourself that you'll need to wait until your "thinking time" to address those issues in your mind.

It's impossible to rehash yesterday or worry about tomorrow when you're living in the present.

Mindfulness will help you become more aware of the here and now.

Telling yourself to stop thinking about something will backfire.

Change the channel in your brain by changing your activity. Exercise, engage in conversation on a completely different subject, or work on a project that distracts you.

The Essay Memorization Technique

There are two stages to this method:

  • The creation stage: the objective is to generate high quality essay plans for every possible title that you could receive in an exam.
  • The memorization stage: transfer all of these essay plans to memory by methodically using active recall, spaced repetition, spider diagrams, and flashcards.

Benefits of this technique: you will be able to memorize so many essay plans by the time your exam is due, that a lot of these will come up at the exam anyway (or similar ones, so you'll have the possibility to compile bits of the memorized information to generate great essays from scratch).

How I ranked 1st at Cambridge University - The Essay Memorisation Framework

youtube.com

There are aspects questions to keep in mind at this stage:

  1. How you decide what essay titles to choose and prepare.
  2. How you plan the essays.
  3. How you make sure your essay plans are high quality.
  • Explore the subject and find essay titles that cover the entire breadth of the syllabus.
  • Keep in mind past essay titles.
  • After you've covered those up (and gained a deeper understanding of the subject), put yourself in the shoes of the examiners and imagine what they could ask you.
  • Start with a question.
  • Use Google to get as much information as you can about that particular question (articles, review papers, everything that could answer your question). Keep all the information in a research document.
  • Create the plan and start developing its sections.
  • Look at the lectures and recommended reading list and finish your essay.
  • Give yourself one day to do this for each essay (keep in mind Parkinson's Law: work expands to fill the time you allocate to it).

The three things that count:

  1. Structure
  2. Actually answering the question
  3. Adding your personal touch, the elements that spice up the whole thing.

The introduction is the essential part because you are signaling to the examiner that you are doing all these things.

The objective of this stage is to transfer all your essay plans into your brain so that you can use them later during the exam.

Useful techniques:

  • ANKI flashcards
  • Spider diagrams
  • A retrospective revision timetable.
  • These flashcards are blocks of content that can insert into the essays you have planned. They also work for essays you have not prepared in advance: you have blocks of knowledge in your head that you can put into your new essay.
  • Everything that is in your ANKI is going to get uploaded into your brain.
  • Use them to memorize the paragraphs of your essays.
  • Use keywords at the front of the cards: for example, the title of a paper you are going to discuss in your ANKI, a theory, or a concept.
  • Using the memorized content blocks of the ANKI flashcards, you can build spider diagrams.
  • You have the whole structure of the essay and the keyword in your diagram.
  • Follow the same process for all your essay title. Put a date on each page.
  • Use 1 page for each essay.
  • You have to draw your essays from memory; if there are things you don't remember, actively work on those.
  • This is a great way use active recall to ensure you know everything for the exam.
  • Before the exam, you can browse through your diagrams.

This is the last step towards effective memorization and it involves systematic spaced repetition. You can do it by using a retrospective timetable.

This technique involves creating a spreadsheet that starts with a list of subjects, topics or essays that you have put together and then inputting the dates on which you study those areas as well as color code the system to provide a visual representation as to which areas we might need to cover again.This method will give you an image of your progress and an overview of how well you know your essays.

Leaders understand the complexity of making decisions. Their decisions must always align with these three dimensions:

  1. Ethics
  2. Morals
  3. Responsibilities of their role

To no one's surprise, these elements come into dispute from time to time. When this occurs, there are no simple answers but by closely considering these three aspects, leaders will go on confidently that the choices they make represent the best possible compromise between their values.

A Framework for Leaders Facing Difficult Decisions

hbr.org

Being able to comprehend who you are and what kind of leader you are is important to cover the three dimensions of making decisions.

To know who you are as a leader try asking yourself these:

  • Am I the leader I wanted to be before I acquired this position? What are my values?
  • What are the values of the company I am representing? Is it looking to maximize value?
  • What are my obligations as a leader and which should be held accountable towards me?

As a leader it is also important to check whether the problem that you are currently facing has been faced by other before. By researching about the answer given by the company and what was the public's opinion regarding it.

You should be able to identify whether the decision you are about to make will fully align with your ethics, moral, and role responsibilities. Is there a need to adjust anything from your perspective? Always make sure to evaluate yourself before doing anything rash.

Once you've gotten to know who you are as a leader and you've evaluated you decision. It is time to strategize a way on how you'll be able to reveal your decision.

You need to keep in mind that there will be times where you have to stand your ground with the decision. Acknowledge that you should sort out all the inconsistencies that could happen when communicating. It is important to make sure that the audience will be able to understand the why's and the how's.

After making a big decision it is crucial to ask yourself:

  • Was I being completely honest with myself in my earlier articulation of my values?
  • What values do put first and at whose expense will my values affect?

Allow yourself to reconcile any inconsistencies and any dilemmas you might still have within yourself. Understand that you are allowing yourself to explore your own decision-making thought process which can make you a better decision maker to the next challenge you face.

Self-control is a key component of emotional intelligence, yet in a study where two million people were asked to rank order their strengths in 24 different skills, self-control ended up in the very bottom slot.

The Six Secrets of Self-Control

forbes.com

Strategies for self-control
  • Meditate.
  • Eat. If your blood sugar is low, you are far more likely to succumb to destructive impulses.
  • Exercise releases GABA, a neurotransmitter that makes your brain feel soothed and keeps you in control of your impulses.
  • Sleep. When you are tired, your brain cells’ ability to absorb glucose is highly diminished.
  • Ride the Wave. Desire has a strong tendency to ebb and flow like the tide. Waiting out this wave of desire is usually enough to keep yourself in control.
  • Forgive Yourself when you slip up. Focus on what you’re going to do to improve yourself in the future.
The River Of Creativity

Most people do not realize that being persistent is a virtue in a creative process.

A person’s first ideas are rarely their most creative ones, as one generally goes through a lengthy brainstorming process, and has to list out and shaft through a large number of nominations.

Your Best Ideas Are Often Your Last Ideas

hbr.org

This is a fallacy where one assumes that their creativity is diminishing with each output.

As the modern workforce faces never-before-seen challenges, it is crucial to harness the creativity of the employees by setting the right expectations of the creative process and to empower them to generate more ingenious ideas.

A manager should educate their subordinates/team members that their reservoir of ideas will keep flowing and they should not believe that they are now running out of ideas.

They should be encouraged to push their cognitive boundaries and look for innovative connections.

There are several ways to give creativity a boost:

  1. Set aside ample time for free, divergent thinking.
  2. Ask for more ideas on a regular basis, keeping the engine running.
  3. Build a tracker which documents the ideas and the time taken to generate them.
  4. Compare results among teams to calibrate your process and to capture the teams full creative potential.
Biophilic design

Biophilic design is a concept of using both direct and indirect exposure to nature to increase wellbeing.

Leading up to 2020, biophilic design was a major office trend. Amazon introduced spherical conservatories to its Seattle headquarters, and Facebook created a 3.6-acre rooftop garden at its Silicon Valley hub. Due to the pandemic, remote workers can bring the concept back home with them and create a work environment with their own wellbeing in mind.

How ‘biophilic’ design can create a better workspace

bbc.com

Phillophilic design is about bringing nature in all its forms, including patterns, materials, shapes, spaces, smells, sights, and sounds, into the urban design on varying scales.

Adding greenery is the most obvious starting point. Other additions are light and colour. Natural light supports the circadian rhythms of the body, which regulate our sleep-wake cycle and hormones. Earth tones can also have an array of positive psychological and physiological effects. However, colours should represent a healthy nature such as forest greens, sky blues, or savannah browns. Look outside and see how you can bring those colours inside.

Objects that move in a constant and unpredictable motion improve blood pressure and heart rate and positively affect the sympathetic nervous system.

This can be incorporated into the home office by adding waving grass outside a window or a fishbowl on a desk. Other relics to add are seashells, geometric forms, or stones.

When things start to feel cluttered, you may have gone overboard.

Taking walks in nature may add to the multisensory benefits, but most spend more than 90% of their time indoors, which creates an urgency to bring nature inside.

How To Be Adaptable
  • Stop whining. Learn to accept the situation, adapt to it, and move on. 
  • Don’t mindlessly believe that something is ‘wrong’ and must be avoided. 
  • Discover your coping mechanism and consider changing some aspects of it. 
  • Be open to change. As long as it’s safe, embrace new things and experiment. 
  • Have multiple plans so no change will surprise you. 
  • Engage in positive self-talk occasionally, to help you adapt faster to changes. Stick to your natural inclinations. 
  • Do what you feel is right for you. 
  • Think big and let go of limitations. 
  • Don’t assign blame as a habit, it’s a waste of time. 
  • Learn the aspects of your life where you are exaggerating or neglecting to balance it. 
  • Stop waiting for self-imposed conditions.

How to Be Adaptable in 11 Simple Steps

dumblittleman.com

F. Scott Fitzgerald
“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald On First-Rate Intelligence

medium.com

The ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind can be applied in many decision-making scenarios, thinking processes and negotiation techniques.

This approach to thinking can prevent you from jumping to conclusions when faced with a difficult situation.

Be open to other ideas besides your own thinking model.

Understanding and empathizing with both sides of an issue, idea or thought, allows you to make strategic decisions in life and business.

Look at things from different perspectives and use them to strengthen your capacity for thought.

Endless choices are rabbit holes to nowhere

With infinite options come increased choices. More choices mean more decisions. However, choice overload makes you question your decisions. This leads to decision fatigue and can cause you to get stuck in negative cycles. You may constantly question the decisions you’ve made and be left wondering what could have been.

Instead of inviting more choices, you need discernment and confidence to close more doors until you're unaware of them.

Why the right kind of ignorance can be a good thing

ideas.ted.com

The best decision-makers purposefully avoid almost all of the options available.

To commit to one decision means closing the door on everything else. It takes confidence to say, "This is what I'm serious about. I can't be distracted by everyone else's noise and agendas." If you're serious about achieving goals, you must create an environment that shields you from other noise.

Strategic ignorance is not about being closed-minded. It's knowing what you want.

It's realizing how easy a person can be derailed. You even avoid amazing situations that you know is really a distraction. You create boundaries and live your priorities and values and dreams.

Hypostatization

Hypostatization is also known as Concretism, or Reification and is a fallacy of ambiguity, where an abstract belief is treated as if it’s real and concrete.

It involves giving substance or attributing real existence to mental constructs, concepts and unproven theories.

Hypostatization: Ascribing Reality to Abstractions and Concepts

thoughtco.com

The Hypostatization Fallacy can be explained by studying the following statement: “The government has a hand in everybody's business and another in every person's pocket. By limiting such governmental pickpocketing, we can limit its incursions on our freedom.”

This assumes that the government is a person, having desires like humans, and can ‘loot’ us like a robber. The fact that is ignored is that the Government is not an entity by itself, but a collection of people. The metaphor of ‘pickpocketing’ also conjures a visual image of a pickpocket, evoking an emotional reaction.

Metaphors can become fallacies as they are taken too far, used too often, or understood mistakenly in the literal sense.

How we describe anything is very powerful as words and language can create lasting impressions in our minds. Language creates a smokescreen that interferes with our impression of reality.

SAVED

Loading...

deepstash

helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

Download from Google PlayDownload from the App Store

Over 2M Installs

4.75 App Score