deepstash

Beta

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress Kit
profile-photo

Makayla O.

@mak_oo16

38

Following

117

Followers

240

Ideas read

68

Stashed ideas

19

Published articles

LAST PUBLISHED

Authentic Leadership: Growing Pains

In the last 10 years, authenticity has been a huge buzzword in the business press. Professionals who are good at their core job, are more often than not struggling in roles they get after they are promoted, as the same skills that made them successful are not enough.

These transition positions require us to leave our established identity and move towards new skills, often at the cost of a complete personality overhaul. This identity crisis while shifting towards a new role feels inauthentic.

@mak_oo16

Yes, good leaders are authentic leaders — but here’s what that actually means

ideas.ted.com

  • The word ‘sincere’ comes from ancient Rome where merchants selling statues would often hide the cracks and flaws with wax. The ones who weren’t dishonest used to hang a sign outside their shop saying “Sine Cera”, meaning without wax.
  • The world ‘authenticity’ comes from the Greek word ‘authenteos’ which means: What is done by one’s own hands.**
  1. Authenticity is being true to yourself: But if the ‘self’ is changing, how is one authentic to the past, present or future self at the same time?
  2. Authenticity is being sincere: It is about saying what we mean, and meaning what we say.
  3. Authenticity is being true to your values: If one has an ingrained value, one cannot sabotage it.

A professional moving up the ladder wants to be successful and have the desired impact, but if in doing so has to sacrifice the ingrained values and integrity, one would end up being less sincere and more ‘political’.

The answer to this paradox may be on how we see our job. If we are only focused on content delivery, knowledge, ideas and research, we would not be able to do anything with ourselves. We have to focus on owning the space where we work with our presence, creating engagement and increasing learning.

Being authentic and sincere is only possible if we grow ourselves through learning, which happens when we do things we aren’t very comfortable with.

We have to move out of the comfort zone we have created in our existing job roles and take the approach of self-authoring, by experimenting and learning things we haven’t done before.

Managing Without Micromanaging
  • Micromanagement has a bad reputation, and team members want to work autonomously, not being watched all the time and told what to do.
  • Managers, however, cannot be held guilty in most cases, as team members doing complex work often need extensive help, and are now farther away in their homes, making it even more difficult to oversee.
  • Extensive research has shown that ‘pervasive helping’ leads to better performance, as compared to leaving the employee alone.

How to Help (Without Micromanaging)

hbr.org

George S. Patton
"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity."

Successful managers don’t preempt every obstacle a team member encounters but watch and listen, looking for the right time to pitch in. If someone is already stuck in the challenge, first-hand, they are engaged enough to take the advice in a positive manner.

Lending the hand at the right time makes the employee use the instructions in a better way, as if the same thing was said in the beginning, it would not have registered with them at all.

  • The power dynamics of being a manager and the multiple personalities that make up a boss can make the subordinates doubt the fact that they can get any effective help.
  • A boss stepping in is perceived as a sign of failure.
  • Employees can become defensive, unreceptive or the provided assistance and demoralized with the involvement of a boss.
  • The Manager needs to clarify their intentions and voice out the fact that they are there as an advisor and not an evaluator.
  • If the project is complex, cognitively demanding and highly creative, one has to engage in a deep manner in the short term, but non-engagement(path clearing) in the long term.
  • The manager has to step in when an employee has come upon an obstacle which cannot be taken care of by some feedback or light input and may need to closely align with the team for days.
  • If the other two key strategies are followed by managers, they won’t have a problem doing a timely and intensive intervention when the need is there.
Strategic developmental feedback

Strategic developmental feedback requires careful thought and insightful construction, in order to help someone learn and improve. It should be:

  • Big-picture focused
  • Organizationally aligned: it should take into consideration the values of your organization
  • Behavioral and specific (should be clear and based on real accomplishments)
  • Factual, not interpretive
  • Both positive and negative (both positive and negative feedback work and fuel for real change)
  • Focused on patterns, not on specific events
  • Linked to impact.

How to Give Feedback People Can Actually Use

hbr.org

Larry Fink
Without a sense of purpose, no company, either public or private, can achieve its full potential; it will ultimately lose the license to operate from key stakeholders.”

As companies become purpose-led, where does that leave charities?

fastcompany.com

Human Well-being 

As companies strive to become more meaningful, purpose-led, sustainable and connected to human well-being, they are seeing increasing value among stakeholders and customers.

A crucial Alliance

To make real progress, governments, civil society, companies, and charities must come together and form an alliance.

As companies work towards their purpose, these are new skills they need to learn:

  • Empathy
  • Global movement
  • Employee orientation towards meaningful work.
Empathy

Companies usually look at what customers want or need.

They need to understand the feelings of the customers, their motivations and empathize with customers beyond the product, at a grassroots level.

Global Movement

Normally, companies are spending top dollar in marketing and lobbying around economic agendas, to increase their profit share in the market.

They need to have a similar global movement towards social causes, using the resources they have, to have a real impact.

Helping Employees find meaning

Good, purpose-led values that drive work in the charity sector needs to be cultivated at the workplace.

Corporates should unlock the purpose and motivation that a charity has, by making their employees find meaning in their work, and helping society, starting from their workforce.

Being Smart Is Not Enough

Most companies hire the smartest people they can find, as they look for candidates who can provide innovative ideas, do the best kind of ‘coding’ or make a great presentation/report.

What hiring managers overlook and often ignore are the predominantly social people who ‘talk’ a lot, and are always on social media, assuming them to be a useless, unproductive lot.

Being Smart is Not Enough

fs.blog

Geniuses: An organization filled with genius-level workforce won’t have people learning from each other, turning into an anti-social organization full of isolated, lonely performers.

Butterflies: Socially adept workers pollinate good ideas and spread innovation around, even ideas that may not be concrete, brilliant or easily visible. This makes the butterflies an essential part of the pollination of information in the organization, creating a healthier, more productive environment.

The Walkman Debut

Today when we have unlimited songs in our pocket, we take them for granted, but forty years ago in 1979, when Sony’s first portable music player the “Walkman” debuted, a personal, portable music player was unheard of. From being a shared experience, music suddenly became a deep personal soundscape, hammering between one’s ears.

Though big by today’s standards, the Walkman was a tiny thing to behold in Japan, where it debuted, and the youth took to the funky gadget that could carry one’s music out of the bedroom, into the subway and city streets. Sony ended up selling two million Walkmans in less than two years.

The Walkman, Forty Years On

newyorker.com

The Walkman goes into history as a social distancing device, isolating people who would want to stay immersed in music, blocking out the rest of the world. This was later termed as the Walkman Effect.

The headphones served as both a ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign and an instant way to get transported to a different world.

The 80s saw celebrities like Donna Summer, Paul Simon, Andy Warhol and many others flashing the Walkman, turning it into a status symbol.

Earphones, earlier associated with geekery or hearing problems, suddenly turned cool.

Steve Jobs, who received a Walkman from the Sony head, Akio Morita, himself, chose to dissect it piece by piece, understanding the machinery behind it. Twenty years later he debuted the iPod, his own version of the portable music player, which had a hard-disk at that time.

The late Apple CEOs Walkman dream was realized when from 2001 till 2007 (when iPhone merged the music player with the phone) he could see his trademark white earbuds in the streets and his digital music players selling in millions.

The path that crises follow
  • Emergency: the team energy rises, teams instinctively pull together and performance goes up.
  • Regression: people get tired lose their sense of purpose and start fighting about the small stuff, because they face too much pressure.
  • Recovery: the team is directed to reopen, rebuild, and prepare for the future.

If You Feel Like You’re Regressing, You’re Not Alone

hbr.org

Regression as a phenomenon comes from developmental psychology and relates to how people go back to a less mature stage when faced with pressure.

It is the most dangerous phase for teams, but it cannot be skipped.

  • Identify how deep you and your team are into the regression phase.
  • Disrupt the team and create a new “day one.”
  • Learn how to adjust your team’s emotions. Maintain an environment where it is safe to be honest about their state of mind.
  • Aim beyond business as usual, prepare to face and anticipate the future in order to provide the most value.

It starts with changing the focus of your team from the short-term risks to your company’s bigger-picture contribution and longer-term opportunities. You change the question from, “How can we handle the crisis?” to, “How can we move out of the crisis?”

The reorientation process can lead your team’s attention towards the recovery phase.

A crisis can be both a moment of glory and and a moment of failure for a leader. The people they work with will remember their actions and decisions, positive or negative, for years to come.

So, as you lead through a crisis, remember that each phase requires a different approach.

Presidential debates in USA, and not only, are a really big deal. During these, candidates have not only the possibility to show to the entire country what they are capable of, but this is also their chance to win over the adversary. However, when not used properly, debates can also turn into candidates' biggest nightmare, as they can be used as later evidence for what was inappropriately said.

The Most Important Presidential Debates in American History, According to Historians

time.com

Having been the first nationally televised presidential debate in history, this event is still seen as a memory worth remembering. Furthermore, what made it even more extraordinary was the fact that both political figures who participated in the debate would later become Presidents. An important take-away refers to the fact that, especially during a public event, one should take care of how she or he looks like.

The most important lesson that one can learn from this debate refers to the fact that you should pay extra attention when making statements during a public debate. The consequences can be quite disturbing, even after some good years.

If during the debate with Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter proved to be more well-informed, the things did not go so well for him during the debate with Ronald Reagan. Reagan taught everybody a great lesson by means of how he talked and behaved throughout the debate: in order to win the elections, you should first make sure to win the public over. And using your charm will surely do the job.

Throughout a political debate, it is equally important to use your charm as it is to present trustworthy information, in order to win the public over. Moreover, if there are three candidates instead of two, this will most probably lead to a more challenging discussion and, therefore, more interesting results.

Debates are sometimes won over by those who know how to get close to the public, rather than those who know everything. Therefore, even if Al Gore was a highly intellectual, he did lose the elections, as people had grown tired of his lecturers.

Disengaged Employees

Engagement at work is a sign of employee motivation and resulting productivity. Unfortunately, only about 13% of people globally are engaged at work, and disengaged employees cost the economy $500 billion per year. Work engagement has a direct correlation with performance.

There is a dire need to increase our ability to collaborate with disengaged and less motivated employees.

How to Work With Someone Who's Disengaged

hbr.org

  • Do not make assumptions about a disengaged employee's performance. While statistically, such employees do underperform, there can be other reasons too.
  • Do not force an employee to be someone they are not. Everyone cannot be happy and optimistic all the time.
  • Do not get emotional, and stick to a transactional, formal, work-focused style. Do not expect to win their hearts or influence them by appealing to their emotions.
  • Do not assign employees tasks beyond their area of expertise.
  • Use extrinsic motivating factors such as incentives and rewards to get productivity from a disengaged employee.
  • Understand what drives them, connect with them, gaining their trust and respect without being emotional, and focus on what they value.
  • Respect an employee's personal space and their need to distance their problems from their work.

Ultimately, it is what an employee delivers that matters most, and a manager has to focus on figuring out how to get the work done.

Take a moment to consider if your employees and team members are coming to you with new ideas and innovations.

To create a sense of security where employees will feel safe to share their ideas, tailor your training strategy to employees ' individual strengths. The employees will feel safe in the training environment and be more willing to take risks when sharing their ideas. From the training room, it can spread organically into day-to-day operations and the workplace culture.

Effectively Lead The Charge To A Culture Of Innovation

riskology.co

Companies with increased growth are 72% more likely to have high diversity in their organization.

Use Learning & Development (L&D) training to raise awareness about the current state of diversity and inclusion in your work environment.

Up to 70% of trainees forget what they learn within 24 hours after training. However, it does not have to be the case for your employees.

An effective leader will implement and integrate an agile training infrastructure into their daily operations that can change quickly to keep up with the pace of innovation.

To develop as an effective leader, recognize where there's room for improvement.

Training professionals will give you objective expertise and training strategies that can bring about real change to how you and your organization currently function.

SAVED

Loading...

deepstash

helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

Download from Google PlayDownload from the App Store

Over 2M Installs

4.75 App Score