Mark D. (@markd17) - Profile Photo

Mark D.

@markd17

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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

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Many people have stories of achieving something great because someone had high expectations of them. The concept of the Pygmalion Effect is that expectations will influence performance and become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

The term "Pygmalion effect" comes from studies done in the 1960s on the effect of teacher's expectations on students' IQ. If teachers had high expectations, would pupils live up to them? Although the conclusion was that the effects were negligible, the idea is widespread.

Mark D. (@markd17) - Profile Photo

@markd17

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Problem Solving

The Inevitable Stage In Growth: Plateau

A common motivation dip is the performance plateau, when the quick and easy gains are over and done with, and slowly the momentum to keep your motivation diminishes. This feels like you have reached some sort of limit, and most people take it as a cue to settle down, and consequently stop improving.

Going beyond the plateau of contentment is crucial to hitting big goals.

A first principle is the fundamental building block of an idea, the most indivisible part that we know to be true and that we can use to build more complex thoughts.

Ancient Greek Philosophy
  • Ancient Greek philosophy extends from as far as the seventh century B.C. up until the beginning of the Roman Empire, in the first century A.D.
  • It distinguishes itself from other early forms of philosophical and theological theorizing for its emphasis on reason as opposed to the senses or the emotions.
  • During this period five great philosophical traditions originated: the Platonist, the Aristotelian, the Stoic, the Epicurean, and the Skeptic.
  • Favorite themes include the principle of reality, the good; the life worth being lived; the distinction between appearance and reality, etc.

It means that we have a good understanding of how we feel emotionally. 

Ignorance Of Our Own Ignorance

The Dunning-Kruger Effect is the mind's tendency to overestimate one’s own knowledge or competence and to underestimate one’s own ignorance. It usually occurs when the information is unknown to us, with one peculiar complication: The information that something is unknown to us is also unknown to us.

The Dunning-Kruger Effect is essentially a meta-layer of ignorance. Example: drivers who pride themselves as being competent and safe drivers making highly unsafe driving errors.

3 decision-making mistakes that you must avoid
  1. Impulsivity. Thorough decisions combine all three senses – seeing, hearing and feeling. Impulsive decisions always lack one of these elements.
  2. Allowing yourself to be persuaded against your better judgment.  The selfish judgment of others should not interfere with your decisions. 
  3. Analysis paralysis. Inner conflict usually means a 'no'. Put off your decision for a while. Make an assessment of the risks involved and decide what size of risk you are willing to take.
FOBO: Fear of Better Options

Whether it is deciding what to watch on TV, or which job offer to accept, Fobo (Fear of better options) can affect anyone.

A Fobo-afflicted person may not make a decision due to wanting complete information or simply be overwhelmed with the daunting options.

Our Need For Control

Nowadays, we do not have the luxury of secure jobs, political stability or affordable housing like past generations. And we often exercise our control in different ways, like relying on planners, which help us with feeling less anxious.

Paper planners are an attractive and effective way to organize the demands of modern life because they provide a refreshingly tactile break from technology.

The Competency Trap

Many people fall into the competency trap, which is the assumption that their established principles and mental models, that have served them all these years, will be sufficient in the future too.

They rely on familiar tools, skills and routines, getting into their comfort zone in the false belief that they don’t need to upgrade or change in this increasingly complex and competitive world, where change is the only constant.

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