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Mohamed Byrne

@mbyrne20

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Ways To Cope With Other People's Clutter
  • Focus on your own clutter - it's never your responsibility to take care of other people's clutter. It's important to keep in mind that we have our own responsibilities.
  • Have a conversation - It's important to raise awareness of an issue that is concerning to you. Let the other person know that you'd prefer if their clutter were organized.
  • Set boundaries - Focus on your own but if theirs crosses a line, it's crucial to set limitations as to how much of their mess you can handle
  • Do it yourself- Sometimes putting a little bit of elbow grease never hurts and hopefully, your habits will rub off on the other person.
  • Make a game out of it - Cleaning and organizing is fun when there's a challenge mixed into it. Put some house music on and challenge them to a decluttering competition and prepare prizes if possible.
  • Be happy - Remember that it's about handling your belongings in a way that your home's energy is vibrant and flowing.

@mbyrne20

Other People's Clutter

nosidebar.com

Systems And Goals

When we are working towards a goal, it is crucial to building a system that will eventually make you reach it. Systems are self-driven daily behaviours that guide and remind you towards what’s really important, and how not to get lost in life.

There isn’t anyone system that is built for an individual, and no two goals are alike. Our upbringing and preferences are different and unique. For example, if common knowledge says one should work in the morning, it may or may not apply to us.

The Checkout Dilemma: How to Know When to Quit (and When to Stick)

samuelthomasdavies.com

One needs to experiment with a variety of systems and routines to finally choose and practice what is right for us and our circumstances.

The common dilemma is when to change and decide to leave a system or stick with it, as we often encounter a variety of obstacles while moving towards a system.

We have often invested time, energy and attention towards a certain system, and are too proud to pivot to another one.

But we can revisit our decision if the path is completely flawed or is useless.

One can keep changing lanes, switching to something new and different, and pivot as we constantly reevaluate our decision.

The problem with constant switching is wastage of time, effort and energy. One can never get anywhere when one is constantly switching systems and pathways. Motion is not progress.

If we have sunken cost in an ongoing system, like a career, it doesn’t mean we should stick with it forever, especially if it is no longer relevant or useful.

One can first choose a system with complete research, and if after a while the system is not looking good, switch from it to something better, just once.

Avoiding talking about your feelings

People with very low emotional intelligence will refuse to talk about their feelings because they aren't good at it. They may use vague language to describe how they feel, such as "I'm a little stressed" or "I'm kind of overwhelmed."

People with high emotional intelligence aren't afraid to describe their feelings. "I feel sad," "I'm angry," or "I'm disappointed."

7 Signs of Low Emotional Intelligence

nickwignall.com

Emotions like fear or sadness feel bad. People with low emotional intelligence criticize themselves, thinking it is wrong to feel afraid. Or shameful to feel sad.

People with high emotional intelligence understand that if something feels bad doesn't mean it is bad. They treat themselves with compassion and kindness when they feel this way.

People with low emotional intelligence think they have to solve difficult emotions. They try to get rid of any painful feelings.

Emotionally intelligent people see emotions as messengers. They validate them even if they don't like the content of the message.

People with low emotional intelligence tend only to notice the loudest emotions. If they get cut-off on the road while driving, they feel "mad" but aren't aware they're also feeling afraid.

People with high emotional intelligence have enough self-awareness to see all their emotions, even the secondary emotions.

Emotions can give important information, but they can also mislead us, such as feeling anger when our spouse points out a problem and asks us to correct it.

Emotionally intelligent people listen to all their emotions but never overvalue them. They don't put blind trust in any of them.

People with low emotional intelligence are afraid of painful feelings in others, so they try to make them go away. For example, they try to explain why you shouldn't feel the way you do or attempt to solve your bad mood.

A sign of high emotional intelligence is when someone is willing to sit with your emotions without judgment or advice.

People with low emotional intelligence pretends to be happy all the time and don't want to admit or show when they're feeling sad, afraid, ashamed, or upset.

Emotionally intelligent people understand that there are no good or bad emotions. They're secure enough to feel bad and show it.

Photosynthesis is the key to life

Photosynthesis is a way to store stable energy.

Ancient bacteria used a thermal-sensing pigment called bacteriochlorophyll to detect the infrared signal generated by heat. These bacteria were the progenitors of descendants that could make chlorophyll. This pigment captures shorter, more energetic light wavelengths from the sun and uses them as a source of power.

How Photosynthesis Captures Light and Powers Life on Earth | HowStuffWorks

science.howstuffworks.com

The process of capturing and storing sunlight meant that ancient bacteria had to burn water. The method of burning is only oxidation - tearing off of electrons from one atom and transferring those electrons to another.

Early photosynthetic bacteria captured the photons and used their energy to strip water of many of its protons and electrons to use for energy production. Later, chlorophyll could split two water molecules at the same time. We call this a Photosystem II chlorophyll-protein cluster.

The Photosystem II (water burning) can't keep going without the second stage Photosystem I. It involves taking the electrons that are stripped from the water molecules in the first step and using them before they decay.

Photosystem I keeps the hard-earned energy by sticking these electrons on a chemical assembly line. It is then used to convert CO2 into sugar that bacteria can use as food.

Chloroplasts are the membrane-bound organelles in plants that conduct photosynthesis.

Chloroplasts have their own DNA and harvest light for the plant.

Memories: Our Sense Of Self

Memories, the vivid remembrances of our past, can be highly subjective. Most of us assume that memories are rigid and infallible, but they can never be the exact representations of the past because they were not copied in our minds with perfect fidelity.

Many of our memories change over time and can be confused by other people’s narrations and even our own dreams and imagination.

We Are What We Remember

fs.blog

Our memories are a major component in our learning process, and all knowledge that we accumulate is stored in memory. Effective learning happens when we hook something that we learn to something already in our memory, in a meaningful context. This creates a strong learning network in our brain, giving birth to innovative connections and fresh ideas.

Being passionate and committed towards our learnings also eliminates the need to cram up stuff.

  • We all have old memories that we dearly hold on to, and these early remembrances form our life’s narrative, the story we tell ourselves.
  • These fixed memories provide us with feelings of nostalgia and make us happy when we listen to old songs or see old pictures.
  • New memories reinforce what we already think about ourselves, as these memories become personal and subjective for us.

The process that provides us with vivid memories is the same one that we are using to imagine something. The mind treats past memory the same way as a future imagination. This also indicates that apart from the present moment, the past and future are just mental constructs.

This interplay of memory and imagination impacts new memory formation, and makes them living organisms, and not like a movie that is recorded and plays exactly the same every time.

Our memories are crucial not only for learning and remembering but also for imagination and creativity.

We have to recognize our tendency to reinforce our own narrative, and instead be aware of the fluid nature of memory.

Sean Stephenson
"If you have a heartbeat, there's still time for your dreams."

3 Mindset Shifts that Will Take You From Nothing to Massive Success

inc.com

Apply Conviction To What You Are Doing

Believe in yourself and apply maximum conviction and dedication to what you are doing. Don't "try", do it. This puts you ahead of the competition.

This applies to your physical body as well. If you are constantly slouched with a frown on your face and arms crossed, that may not serve you well. That kind of posture can come across as defensive, negative or closed minded. A strong, positive, and open posture will make things that much more attainable.

Reframe Your Problems

Problems can be interpreted as opportunities to use different resources and find alternatives.

A problem means life is eliminating options and helping you choose how you are going to be successful. In the case of not having money, it may mean you have to learn to do it yourself. 

Your Self-Perception Is Extremely Relevant

Your mind and your body are all that you truly need. Everything else is a luxury. In fact, there are even people becoming successful with no arms or legs.

Many of the world's most successful people have faced extremely difficult times, financial burdens, failed relationships, failed businesses, homelessness and other hardships. But learning how to turn these "problems" into benefits has been one of the biggest turning points for many successful people.

Sticky Tunes: When Songs Become Earworms
  • The songs that get stuck in our heads, those catchy but often annoying earworms are common, especially the Christmas melodies during the holiday season.
  • New research into these tunes stuck in the brain shows that they are conventional melodies (often instrumental) but have an unexpected repetition/loop, and can even impair our concentration.
  • During the Christmas season, melodic holiday songs play in public places like bars and cafes and are often heard on the radio, leading to a more than usual exposure. These songs have a certain melody that is ‘scrunchy’ and forms a familiar chord known as the Christmas chord, making them prone to become earworms.

Christmas earworms: the science behind our love-hate relationship with festive songs

theconversation.com

  • White Christmas by Irving Berlin is the best selling single of all time and is studied on why it is popular for decades, and sold over 50 million copies. It seems to fall into the category of a likeable earworm.
  • Most songs follow a U-shaped curve of liking. New music isn’t liked very much, but as it gets familiar and is heard repetitively (on the radio and in the mall), one tends to like it more.
  • This repetition effect is U-shaped as too much exposure diminishes the fondness towards the song.
  • The reason we like the Christmas songs every year lies in the U-shaped curve of liking being a cycle.
  • A person, after getting fed up from a song, starts to move away from it, but after a span of time, is again exposed to the same song, tends to like it as before (for a while). This is called the ‘Squirrel’ approach to listening.
  • It is also the reason many CDs of old bands which we dumped, sound great when we hear them after a long time.
Real Life Lessons From Videogames
  1. Difficulty increases as you progress.
  2. If there are no obstacles you’re going in the wrong direction. 
  3. Look for secrets and do some side quests to get better fast. 
  4. You have multiple lives, but don't waste them.
  5. Tutorials will save you later even if they don’t seem useful at first.
  6. Use the pause button. You'll feel better, with a clear mind.
  7. Don't be that player who only cares about themselves
  8. Explore the map. Maybe something interesting will pop up.
  9. Offer help to those in need, but don't feel bad when they lack the drive to keep going.
  10. Help the less fortunate
  11. Good things and bad things appear differently
  12. Everyone wants to be a hero, even bad people.
  13. Let things go. Don’t forget, but don’t be burdened, either.
  14. There's a pattern to games, and to life. 
  15. You're not alone. 

15 Lessons About Life We Learn From Video Games

forbes.com

Asteroids
  • Asteroids are rocks which revolve around the sun. They are usually too small to be considered as a planet since they can be as small as 2 meters but they can be as big as 940 kilometers across.
  • Asteroids are also known as planetoids or minor planets. They are often irregularly shaped but some tend to be almost spherically-shaped. They have pitted surfaces and are covered in dust.
  • They can be dangerous because many have hit Earth in the past and it's likely that it can happen again.

Asteroids - Facts and Information about Asteroids | Space

space.com

Asteroids are what's left after the formation of our solar system from billions of years ago.

It is believed that the reason why they were formed were because of the birth of Jupiter. Its birth hindered any planetary bodies to form in the space between Mars and Jupiter, which resulted to the small objects that were present to crash onto each other and fragment themselves.

The two theories that back this up are the Nice model and the Grand Tack.

The different types of asteroids are:

  • Main belt asteroids - Lies in between Mars and Jupiter; holds more than 200 asteroids
  • Trojan asteroids - found outside the main belt; usually orbits larger planets
  • Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) - circles close to earth; there are three types of NEAs, Apollo, Aten, and Atira
  • The C-type - carbonaceous asteroids
  • The S-type - silicaceous asteroids
  • The M-type - metallic asteroids
  • The V-type - has a basaltic and volcanic crust
  • If an asteroid crashes through Earth's surface, it is then called a meteorite.
  • For an asteroid to cause a global panic it has to be more than a quarter-mile wide, an impact from an asteroid this size would cause dust to raise into the atmosphere and thus creating a "nuclear winter"
  • However, smaller asteroids are believed to strike Earth every 1,000-10,000 years; and the most dangerous asteroids are extremely rare.

We can observe an asteroid by observing them through a radar. The radar can reveal its size, shape, and whether it is two objects.

In the unlikely event that an asteroid is deemed a threat, NASA has inventions to effectively diffuse them such as:

  • Kinetic Impactor - a spacecraft that slams into the asteroid to move it's orbit; and
  • Gravity Tractor - a spacecraft that remains near the asteroid until it has its own gravity to gradually alter its path

Amusingly, the collisions that could possibly bring death to us may be the reason we are alive today.

When Earth was formed it was unable to support growth and desolate. Asteroid and comet collisions may have delivered the water-ice and other carbon-based molecules that allowed the planet to evolve and support life after billions of years.

  • In 1801, Giuseppe Piazzi discovered the first and largest asteroid, Ceres, orbiting between Mars and Jupiter (Today it is classified as both an asteroid and a dwarf planet)
  • In 1802, William Herschel coined the term "asteroid"
  • In 1851 - 15 new asteroids were discovered and the naming process changed to include with numbers. For example: (1) Ceres

Fun fact: There is an asteroid named after Mr. Spock of Star Trek.

  • 1991 - NASA's Galileo was able to take close-up images of asteroids
  • 1994 - Discovered the first moon to orbit an asteroid
  • 2001 - Landed a spacecrafts successfully on Near-Earth Asteroid Eros
  • 2006 - Japan's Hayabusa was the first spacecraft to land on and take off from an asteroid
  • 2011 - NASA's Dawn mission was the first spacecraft to visit Vesta and Ceres
  • 2016 - NASA launched an explorer to the asteroid Bennu
  • 2017 - NASA's Discovery Program will launch two new projects: Lucy and Psyche
The era of problem-solving generalists

From an era of specialized workers having expertise in one particular activity, the professional world has slowly moved towards problem-solving generalists. Workers are asked to don different hats and do more with fewer resources, and without specialized training.

HR consulting firms see the rise of hybrid jobs when two or more positions are combined to be performed by one individual.

At Work, Expertise Is Falling Out of Favor

theatlantic.com

Mastery, once a sought-after attribute, is falling out of favour, according to the 2016 World Economic Forum report, and is slowly clearing the field for employees who can:

  • Have a diverse set of skills.
  • Can display the mental agility to switch between tasks.
  • Are able to pivot towards a new problem or activity.
  • Can take on a variety of roles at a short notice.

With the value of true expertise in serious decline, and the economy evolving towards a different set of requirements from employees, the impact on college education, career paths, worker safety, employability and even the nature of work is going to be profound.

The personality traits of employees seen in many new organizations:

  1. Fluid Intelligence: The raw processing power that combines working memory with a dynamic kind of intelligence, mostly found in youngsters.
  2. Conscientiousness: Trustworthy, compassionate, people, who are high on emotional quotients.
  3. Openness To The New: People who are less focused on doing a particular thing in the right way, and more towards trying to do the right thing. This is also termed as ‘distractibility’.

The most sought after skill in educational and professional circles, a person who can work in a single task with complete tenacity and focus, blocking any distractions. The skill is valued in stable environments where rigid adherence to routine is a good thing.

When rules, roles and conditions rapidly change, grit gives way to ‘psychological hardiness’ where one tends to see all experiences as interesting, useful and meaningful, along with a high level of self-confidence.

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