Miles

@miles_n697

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It`s more important to know where you`re going than to get there quickly.

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Following668

Stashing since Nov 11, 2020

23 Published

3 Stashes

154 Stashed Ideas

Your Morning Alarm

We mostly use our smartphone’s alarm to wake up in the morning and rising up to a startling ‘beep beep’ sound can actually hinder our work performance and alertness.

Harsh alarms can disrupt our brain activity when awake, while the melodic alarm sounds like old pop songs can help the brain transition softly and effectively to a waking state.

@miles_n697

Time Management

Systems are the best way to progress since they reward effort and we control all the variables. However, we need to have a sense of direction in those efforts, to know what we are trying to accomplish.

Writing daily with no objective is just practice. If you want to achieve something, you need to commit to a certain output, like publishing a post on your blog weekly. At the end of the day, a system is a way to control how to achieve an output.

Focusing On The Essentials In Life

Essentialism is a disciplined, systematic approach for determining where our highest point of contribution lies, then making execution of those things almost effortless.

Being constantly interrupted by many different tasks isn't going to make you successful, only distracted. So clear away the distractions and put most of your energy on the essentials and create something worthwhile.

Keeping a meeting to 15 minutes

Not every meeting can be done in 15 minutes, but for general day-to-day things, 15 minutes is ideal.

  • Work expands to the time you schedule for it. If you plan a 2-hour meeting, it will likely fill two hours and waste valuable work time.
  • If a meeting has a purpose, 15 minutes is sufficient and tasks can be made and assigned.
  • Our brain and attention spans have limits. The act of listening is equally draining as thinking hard about a subject. The more information we are asked to take in, the more difficult it becomes to stay focused.
  • Capture. Write down everything you need to do.
  • Clarify. Break down each task into an actionable next step. 
  • Organize. Move each of those actionable tasks onto a specific list: E.g: Action: Things to do next, Waiting For: Tasks or projects you’ve delegated or are waiting on other people for, etc.
  • Reflect. Set time aside to re-assess your priorities and update your lists weekly or daily.
  • Engage. Start working through your Action list in order.

Consider getting washed and dressed before going back to bed to work. A clean and relatively tidy bedroom will be a more pleasant workplace.

A lovely neutral duvet cover works best as patterned linen can be distracting and busy. A throw or rug that you use when you work will help create a boundary.

Focus on what matters
  • Write down the end goal.
  • Divide the goal into specific actions you need to take to get there. Think in terms of systems: focussed, routine actions that you can do daily.
  • List all your tasks and rank them according to effort and impact. This makes prioritizing tasks easier.
  • Do the highest priority task using focused, distraction-free blocks of time.
  • Keep repeating this until you achieve your goal
Resisting The Traps Of Structure

Many of us would prefer to have a life filled with freedom and choice, rather than a fixed, imposed or structured routine. The structure feels good but after a while, there is an urge to rebel against it, as it feels like a chain tied to the leg.

The mess that is created when one rebels against a self-created structure is actually crucial for our growth. Whatever we are doing in our lives, managing, leading or creating, cannot be fruitful without structure.

Boredom is not that simple to explain

We may tend to think of boredom as a response to monotonous activities. But boredom isn't this clearcut.

Research reveals that there's a significant variation in how much boredom each person can deal with.

We Are On Our Own

In his self-help book "Smarter, Faster, Better", Charles Duhigg observes that we are now masters of our own time.

The onus to manage our time, attention, focus and priorities is on us. We are our own motivation, and have a variety of 'productivity' tools to fine-tune our managing, teamwork, decision-making and absorbion of information and data.

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