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6 Modern Sabbatical Ideas

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6 Modern Sabbatical Ideas

6 Modern Sabbatical Ideas

https://remoteyear.com/blog/modern-sabbatical-ideas

remoteyear.com

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Key Ideas

Modern Sabbaticals

Traditionally, a sabbatical is a period of paid or unpaid leave that is granted to an employee so that they may study or travel.

A modern sabbatical is no longer defined as the absence of work. It can be defined as an active pursuit of purpose.

Write a novel

You will have a lot of time on your hands to consider the creative ideas in your mind.

Write it down and self publish. Share your knowledge and your narrative with the world.

Start a side hustle

Do you have a skill that you would like to improve?

You could use your sabbatical to start a client base for consulting work and build your portfolio while making a profit.

Volunteer

There are many opportunities where you can use your specific skill set to impact the world. You could spend your time helping a worthy cause while learning about yourself and others along the way.

Seek Next-Level Education

A sabbatical may be the time to pursue a higher level of education. 

Don’t stop at traditional education avenues either - invest in e-courses, read more books, listen to podcasts (or start your own).

Set An “Unreachable” Goal

Set a goal that you would never have done because it would require too much time or effort.

The goal should make you feel like you’re growing and leave you feeling accomplished.

Join a Work and Travel Program

Join a community of people who are working or in the midst of their professional pursuit, and travel to a different city every month together.

It is your chance to expand your perspective to include the stories, challenges, and optimism of people.

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Tips For Finding The Right Goals
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  • Combine it with something that inspires y...
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Chris Guillebeau

"Embracing new things often requires us to embrace our fears, however trivial they may seem. You deal with fear not by pretending it doesn’t exist, but by refusing to give it decision-making authority."

What Happens After You Achieve Your Goals

If the goal is meaningful, it will transform you. You’ll be more confident, mature, capable of seeing even bigger adventures, and empowered to pursue them.

A quest might end better than we imagine or disastrously. Either way, there’s always another adventure if we’re willing to pursue it.

Get and stay physically calm

Start by counting to 100 by threes so you will have to think a little. It may momentarily distract you from the panic and you'll have a better chance to think clearly.

Look for perspective

Most work crises are overblown. It is important for those caught in the moment to search for perspective by asking themselves if it is a major problem or a problem that is quite fixable. 

Try to be the voice of reason

If you can cultivate the ability to stay calm and look for useful solutions, you will find yourself respected for it.
The ability to stay calm yourself makes others calmer.

Self-awareness has 2 components
  • Internal self-awareness: the ability to introspect and recognize your authentic self;
  • External self-awareness: the ability to recognize how you fit in with the rest of the world. ...
The “bias blind spot"

It relates to our tendency to recognize cognitive biases in others, without noticing them in ourselves. In other words, our brain isn’t built to easily spot our own lack of self-awareness.  

Self-awareness and leadership

After examined the traits that contribute to the effectiveness of successful leaders, researchers concluded that a high level of self-awareness was the strongest predictor of success: when leaders are self-aware, they know how to hire subordinates who are strong in the areas where they themselves are weak.

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"Don’t break the chain"

This is a productivity and motivation technique used and popularised by Jerry Seinfeld.

Each day you complete your task, you put an X in your calendar. Just keep at it and the ch...

Momentum vs Friction

Not breaking the chain leads to momentum, the force that allows something to grow stronger or faster as time passes. But like everything else, momentum has an equal and opposite reaction.

Friction is the resistance caused when one object is moving at a different rate than another. Friction the enemy of momentum, the force that breaks the chain.

The compound effect

Sustained momentum toward a singular goal creates a compound effect. 

This means that consistent, incremental changes can result in fundamental changes over time.

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The right side of the brain

Creativity isn’t the preserve of one side of the brain, and it isn’t a talent confined to people with a special kind of brain. If you’re human and you’ve got a brain, you’re capabl...

The “Eureka!” moment

This myth encourages the belief that creativity is a passive process. It suggests you have to wait and hope that you’ll make a breakthrough.

That Eureka moment is actually the last step in a long, involved process and not the only step. For this to happen, your unconscious mind needs material to work with. You have to put in the hard work of studying and mastering your field and exposing yourself to different perspectives.

The lone, eccentric geniuses

In reality, creativity is a team sport.

The lone genius myth is a stereotype and it’s unhelpful because it suggests the route to innovation is to cut oneself off from colleagues and collaboration. You need a modest amount of intelligence to be creative, but extremely high IQ is neither sufficient nor necessary for being an innovator.

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Chasing after the next goal

In our consumer culture, we end up buying more and doing more. To be satisfied is almost considered an offense because it means you're not chasing after the next thing.

Part of the same vicio...

Missing out on life

Taking secularization into account, the idea that we don't live in order to obtain some kind of salvation in the afterlife leads to the belief that we have to achieve everything we desire in the here and now.

If we miss out on anything in this life, it is seen as some kind of existential failure. Carried to an extreme, it is tragic because it's rarely a recipe for a good life.

The joy of missing out

We gain from it the chance to engage in activities and experiences that are deeper and more meaningful. Because the mentality of fearing that we will miss out makes us always worried that something better might be waiting for us.

And moving through life, where everything becomes a means to the next thing, prevents us from understanding that certain things are inherently valuable and meaningful in and of themselves.

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Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize your emotions, understand what they’re telling you, and realize

Pillars of Emotional Intelligence
  1. Self-Awareness
  2. Empathy
  3. Self-Regulation
  4. Motivation
  5. Social Skills
  6. Happiness
Self-Awareness

Use present language to help focus more on the present moment. Put your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs on paper. 

Knowing how to express your emotions can often help you manage them in a proper and healthy way. Don’t be afraid to give yourself the gift of silence and meditation. 

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Shockingly Unproductive
  • Studies show that employees spend more than five hours per day reading and replying to emailsWhile it may seem like urgent work, email is not the best kind of work.
Facilitate Deep Work

A few smart strategies that can be deployed:

  1. Installing pods for deep work while having common areas for collaborative work.
  2. Wearing headphones that are easily seen to signal that you are not to be disturbed.
  3. Turning your office into a library, following the same culture of quietness where everyone is hushed and respectful.
Email is not Real Work

Real work, by definition, should be rare, valuable and cognitively demanding.

Email does not check any of these boxes, and is, therefore, a pseudo work.

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Innovation in business

The idea of innovation is taking off just as fast as the businesses that embrace it.

But, not all companies are prepared to push innovation within their organizations. Changing workplace s...

Intrapreneurship

An intrapreneur can be defined as someone who thinks like an entrepreneur but brings their ideas to the company where they are employed instead of launching their own business. 

Instate a "no idea is a bad idea" policy, gather the support your employees need to try out their ideas and let them pitch decision-makers at your company.

McKnight’s 15-percent-time rule

This allows employees to spend 15 % of their paid work time daydreaming, doodling or experimenting with ideas that don’t necessarily have to do with their work at the company.

This kind of daydreaming is the genesis of invention and fosters passion for one’s work.

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The new law of productivity

High-Quality Work Produced = (Time Spent) x (Intensity of Focus)

Deep work vs. Shallow work
  • Deep work: Professional activities performed in a state of distraction-free concentration that push your cognitive capabilities to their limit. Creates value.
  • Shallow work: Noncognitively demanding, logistical-style tasks, often performed while distracted. Doesn't create value.
4 philosophies to integrate Deep Work into your life
  • Monastic: maximize Deep Work by minimizing or removing shallow obligations. Isolate yourself for long periods of time without distractions; no shallow work allowed
  • Bimodal: divide your time into some clearly defined stretches to deep pursuits and leave the rest open to everything else. Reserve a few consecutive days when you will be working like a monastic. You need at least one day a week
  • Rhythmic: involves creating a routine where you define a specific time period — ideally three to four hours every day — that you can devote to Deep Work
  • Journalistic: alternate your day between deep and shallow work as it fits your blocks of time. Not recommended to try out first.

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