Research On Rumination - Deepstash

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What are Negative Emotions and How to Control Them?

Research On Rumination

  • It has been linked to overeating, smoking, alcoholism, insomnia, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and clinical anxiety and depression.
  • Excessive rumination after a negative emotional experience leads to prolonged recovery time from the physiological impact of the experience.
  • Many confuse it with problem-solving which can lead to prolonged ruminating and further implications for mental and physical wellbeing.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Emotions are present at all times

Most emotions arise unconsciously as ways of adapting to changes in the environment or in our own mind.

We are emotional beings and there is no experience that does not receive the imp...

The loss of emotional regulation brings:
  • Non-acceptance of emotional response (reacting to the expression of emotion)
  • Difficulty to commit to planned goals (by the irruption of afflictive emotion)
  • Difficulty in controlling impulses (not being able to inhibit)
  • Lack of emotional awareness (not being able to name it, label it)
  • Limited access to emotional regulation strategies (not knowing how to regain control over afflictive emotion)
  • Lack of emotional clarity (not being able to discern the emotions that appear)

Mindfulness can bring improvements in all of these facets.

Afflictive emotions

Within the universe of Mindfulness (following Buddhism), these are emotions that arise in reaction to an experience of displeasure or discomfort in our life, and that make us react without more control of the mind.

Afflictive emotions are not the basic ones of our human condition, like fear, anguish or the most primary anger, but what we do with them.

Emotional clarity

It means that we have a good understanding of how we feel emotionally. 

Label your emotions

Use plain language. The more fluent you are with real emotional language, the more clearly you will be able to think about how you’re feeling.

Clarify your emotions

Get used to the idea of emotional complexity. When we feel upset, we're not feeling one single emotion. We are usually experiencing a blend of many emotions.

Training ourselves to look for and see this emotional complexity is key to better understanding ourselves when we’re upset and moving on in a healthy way.

Emotions During a Difficult Conversation

It’s hard not to get worked up emotionally when you’re in a tense conversation: a disagreement can feel like a threat.

But if your body goes into “fight or flight” mode,  ...

Breathe

When you start noticing yourself getting tense, try to focus on breathing (on feeling the air coming in and out of your lungs).

This will take your attention off the physical signs of panic and keep you centered.

Focus on your body

Sitting still when you’re having a difficult conversation can make the emotions build up rather than dissipate. 

Standing up and walking around helps to activate the thinking part of your brain.