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Net worth meaning (and why you should know yours)

Why you should know your net worth

  • Knowing your net worth provides you with an actual state of your finances.
  • It can also tell you how close you are to achieving financial independence.
  • Tracking over time helps you know if you're spending too much month after month.
  • When opening a bank or brokerage account, your net worth will be considered. Knowing up front can help you see whether you're eligible for certain investments.

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Net worth meaning (and why you should know yours)

Net worth meaning (and why you should know yours)

https://thinksaveretire.com/net-worth-meaning/

thinksaveretire.com

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Key Ideas

Your net worth

Your net worth is the total value of all your assets, minus all of your liabilities.

It is important to know your net worth so you can calculate how much progress you're making and how close you are to financial independence. Banks and investment advisors use this number to assess your creditworthiness and sophistication as an investor.

How to calculate net worth

  1. Add up the total valued of your cash and other assets. Items could be cash, stocks, bonds, DCs, 401(k), real estate, the money you're owed. Your goal is to determine how much these assets would be worth if you were to convert them into cash.
  2. Then subtract all your outstanding liabilities, such as credit card balances, student loans, mortgage(s), medical debt, car loans, private loans, payments remaining on a home or car lease.

Why you should know your net worth

  • Knowing your net worth provides you with an actual state of your finances.
  • It can also tell you how close you are to achieving financial independence.
  • Tracking over time helps you know if you're spending too much month after month.
  • When opening a bank or brokerage account, your net worth will be considered. Knowing up front can help you see whether you're eligible for certain investments.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Net Worth = Assets - Liabilities

Your net worth gives an overview of your financial situation at this point. It is the difference between what you own and what you owe.

Your net worth is positive if your assets exceed...

Calculating your assets and liabilities

Assets are anything of value that you own that can be converted into cash. Examples include:

  • Investments
  • Bank and brokerage accounts
  • Retirement funds
  • Real estate
  • Personal property: vehicles, jewellery and collectables.
  • Cash

Your liabilities represent your debts, such as loans, mortgages, credit card debt, medical bills and student loans.

Find your ideal

Determine your target net worth - where you want to be in the near-term and long-term future.

The following formula is helpful:

Target Net Worth=[Your Age−25]∗[1/5∗Gross Annual Income]

A 50-year-old with a gross annual income of $75,000 might aim for a net worth of $375,000 ([50 - 25 = 25] x [$75,000 ÷ 5 = $15,000])
Your net worth can be much more or much less than the amount indicated by the guideline.

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What early retirement means
What early retirement means

Early retirement is not defined as when you stop working forever, but as having the freedom and flexibility that saving up enough money can give you if you want to leave a job.

...
How to retire early

A good early retirement strategy is built on maximizing three aspects: Income, expenses, and savings.

To build your early retirement strategy, you need to determine your retire early or financial independence (FI) number. It is the amount of money you need for work to become optional. Be aware that the number will (and should) change as you change, and your desired lifestyle evolves.

The money you need for early retirement

Based on a series of papers known as the Trinity Studies, you need to save 25-30 times your expected annual expenses to have enough money to last you for the rest of your life.

This multiple is based on the percentage of your investment growth that you would be able to withdraw per year. A safe early retirement withdrawal percentage is between 3%-4%.

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Financial planning

 ...is the process which provides you a framework for achieving your life goals in a systematic and planned way by avoiding shocks and surprises.

Try making a budget
  • Create a full inventory of expenses in front of you: Categorize them into fixed and variable; urgent and non-urgent; necessities and luxury; avoidable and unavoidable.
  • You can create a hierarchy of needs and decide which one’s to address first. It’s all about prioritizing. 
  • Accept that you have limited resources and unlimited wants. But you have to manage your resources. The sooner you accept this fact, the better you can control your impulses towards avoidable expenditures.
Maintain a personal balance sheet

It’s a statement wherein you can jot down your assets and liabilities.

  • Pull together your bank statements and other proofs of the liabilities
  • List down your assets like the bank balance, all investments, home value, and value of other assets.
  • Take a sum of all the assets to arrive at the total value of your assets.
  • List down your liabilities the (car loan, home loan, credit card balances etc.)
  • The sum of all the liabilities will show the value of the money you owe.
  • When you subtract the value of liabilities from assets, you get your Net Worth.

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Side Hustle to Make More Money

You don't have to sacrifice all of your free time to start a side hustle, use the time you’re comfortable with and make a little bit of progress every day. 

Take Action

Get to working on improving your finances today, not tomorrow. Reading the steps and thinking you’re capable of doing it but postponing it is just an excuse, an unprofitable one.

Communicate With Your Partner

Talking about your financial goals, and scheduling time once a month to go over your finances together can prevent money from affecting your relationship.

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Education and wealth

College degrees can add significant wealth. The more education you have, the more you’ll earn and the less likely you are to be unemployed. And if you can keep debt low while getting th...

Controlling expenses and wealth
Those who control their spending do much better. This doesn’t mean you have to save on EVERYTHING, just some things. Enjoy your life by spending on what you want here and there, just keep it in line so you have excess to save and invest. Even 10% will make you wealthy over time.

You’ve probably heard that time is your greatest investing asset. It’s true. The more investments earn and grow on their own, the greater they become.

Investment value is also greatly impacte...

You’ve probably heard that time is your greatest investing asset. It’s true. The more investments earn and grow on their own, the greater they become.

Investment value is also greatly impacted by the amount invested.

Investing defined

Investing is about laying out cash or assets now, in the hope of more cash or assets returning to you tomorrow, or next year, or next decade.

Most of the time, this is best achieved th...

Productive assets explained
  • Productive assets are investments that internally throw off surplus money from some sort of activity. 
  • Each type of productive asset has its own pros and cons, unique quirks, legal traditions, tax rules, and other relevant details.
  • The three most common kinds of investments from productive assets are stocks, bonds, and real estate.
Investing in Stocks
  • It means investing in common stock, which is another way to describe business ownership or business equity.
  • When you own equity (the value of the shares issued by a company) in a business, you are entitled to a share of the profit or losses generated by that company's operating activity.
  • Equities are the most rewarding asset class for investors seeking to build wealth over time without using large amounts of leverage.

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Robert Kiyosaki

“A person can be highly educated, professionally successful, and financially illiterate.”

Robert Kiyosaki
Financial Literacy Questions

A financially literate person should be able to answer these questions:

  • How much are they earning after tax and after saving for retirement? Is it fair considering their education level and job title?
  • Are they earning above sector median rates, below, or on par?
  • How much goes to their retirement accounts?
  • How much goes into their investments?
  • What are the rates of return on their investments when benchmarked against an index like the S&P 500?
  • What are their financial plans?
  • Can they read a company's financial statement?
  • Do they understand their tax benefits?
  • Do they understand their retirement requirements?
  • Do they have a plan for retiring?
How much you should save every month
How much you should save every month

The popular 50/30/20 rule states that you should reserve 50 percent of your budget for essentials like rent and food, 30 percent for discretionary spending, and 20 percent for savings.

But ...

Why 20 percent is recommended

Assuming you're in your 20s or 30s and can earn an average investment return of five percent a year, you'll need to save about 20 percent of your income so you can reach financial independence when you're older.

Financial independence means that you can maintain your chosen lifestyle entirely from the interest of your investments and dividends.

The four percent rule

The four percent rule states that you could withdraw four percent of your principal balance every year and live on this indefinitely. That means you need to save 25 times your annual expenses to become financially independent.

The four percent rule is not perfect. There is no risk-free investment that yields that much today. Sudden inflation could also cause a problem.

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The Definition of Rich
The Definition of Rich

A high income and a regular acquisition of expensive stuff do not necessarily make people rich. People may have a high income, but many won’t survive three months if they are suddenly without their...

Wealthy People and Pseudo Affluence

Wealthy people have sustainable access to money, often for a very long period of time. Their habits are now aligned with the wealth that they have incurred.

Pseudo affluence, on the other hand, is what people experience when they are currently earning lots of money and start to believe that they are rich. They pay for their expensive lifestyle with a high amount of borrowed money and are just a job-loss away from being poor again.

Object Poor

... is a ‘state of excess’ when the stuff we own makes us poor, as the debt we incur has trapped us to keep working our jobs to fund the expensive lifestyle and habits.

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The wealthy
The wealthy

Most rich people do not flaunt their wealth: They don't live in high-class neighborhoods or drive expensive cars. They look like you and me.

The rich have a net worth of above $1 millio...

The pseudo-affluent

They buy things that convey success. They want you to know just how much stuff they have by showing off their success.

The pseudo-affluent feel insecure about how they compare with the Joneses and the Smiths. They hold on to the belief that all economically successful people display their success through prestige products.

Characteristics of the pseudo-affluent

The pseudo-affluent generally:

  • They earn a high-income, but spend the majority of what they make.
  • Wear expensive suits or carry expensive purses.
  • Drive high-end luxury or sports cars.
  • Really believe that rich people act rich.

It does not mean that every person that drives a BMW pretends to be rich, but those who do spend the majority of high incomes spend it in a way to display their wealth.

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