Time Management

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Virtual Reality gamers or users experience amplified time compression due to the lack of bodily awareness.

Studies have been done and proved that virtual reality indeed warps one's perception of time due to being totally immersed in VR and that the environment VR gives is one that prevents a person's awareness.

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Time Management

  • VR users unintentionally spend an excessive amount of time in games because VR headsets are becoming more comfortable for long-session usages.
  • It entails a risk of addiction that is associated with depression and insomnia, thus reducing their ability to tend to their mood and health.
  • Clocks must always be easily accessible and appear automatically at regular intervals.

There are studies that involve the use of VR for patients undergoing therapy who claim to experience time compression effects.

Another study suggests that using VR during sessions as such is a surprisingly effective painkiller due to the power of distraction.

As technology evolves, we hope to see more advancement in this area.

Time Compression

Time compression the phenomenon where time goes by quickly when we're immersed in something that we're doing.

This usually happens to people who play video games or movie bingers.

A number of studies on office temperature revealed that:

  1. The ideal working temperature should be 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Cold temperatures increase feelings of sadness and loneliness.
  3. 20 percent of employees have argued with coworkers about the office temperature being too hot or too cold, with the same number also secretly changing the temperature.
  4. While 53 percent had low productivity with a cold office, 71 percent felt they were less productive with warm temperatures.
  5. Overheating shoots up the cost of cooling by about ten times.
  6. Not just the temperature, but the ventilation in the office contributes to the perception of comfort.
  • According to studies, 91 percent of employees that took part in the research, believed that Work From Home (WFH/Telecommuting) is more productive.
  • 41 percent liked the choice about the place and time of working.
  • Imposed WFH had a portion of employees feel less happy or valued at work.
  • WFH employees with shorter working hours spread on all seven working days were the happiest, as compared to others with typical or unusual working hours.
  • The study highlighted how flexibility is important as many employees have different preferences and home environments.

Natural light has a direct effect on productivity and also reduces depression.

Poor lighting can affect an employee's mood and focus. Studies conducted by the Lighting Research Centre show that light has a strong influence on alertness, affecting the circadian clock of the employee as well.

Windows and daylight exposure has an increased positive impact, and a greater sense of health according to the Journal Of Clinical Sleep Medicine. It affects the mood of the employee, leading to more exercise and better rest.

A study showed that employees with 150 minutes of physical activity a week had better work satisfaction, especially when they exercise before work.

Exercise, as expected, also results in less depression, and lowers job burnout.

If an organization focuses on employee wellbeing, they report greater employee engagement, better retention, and less absenteeism.

Corporations that actively promote health and wellness programs see all-around benefits like a decrease in absenteeism, 25 percent better retention, and 47 percent better engagement of employees.

The factors that influence wellbeing include design and construction elements like comfortable furniture, thermal comfort, quality of air, lighting, daylight views, gym facility, food quality, and options for mental relaxation.

A study showed that standing desks are beneficial for employee health, and increase productivity. Calling is more impactful while standing as opposed to sitting, with about a 53 percent better success rate.

Standing desks ensure better circulation and bring more oxygen to the brain, boosting mental clarity, provided the necessary precautions are taken and guidelines are provided.

No, answering e-mails is not enough to call yourself productive. With the hours you have in your hands now, name a project you've done with exceptional work. If none is your answer then it's best if you set your priorities straight.

Now that you have time in your hands, it's not about how much time you spend on a project or a task but what you do with the time given. Try doing more of less, it's simple and cost-effective.

It is important to know your strengths and weaknesses as an individual. Studies show that 2.5 to 4 hours after waking up is when most people's brains are sharpest. Give the painfully exciting tasks your best hours and commit to finishing it.

Know yourself even more. This allows yourself to be provided with options of what works for you and what doesn't so you know when to go for it or when to avoid it. Watch yourself work, take notes, find patterns and alter your schedule accordingly.

If you want to take time into consideration, consider making a day-to-day schedule. It will help you keep yourself on track of your goals and help you prioritize what is important rather than just being reactive the entire day.

When it comes to your environment, learn how to set spaces for where you feel motivated to work, a space for relaxation, and a space for your hobbies. It aids your mind to wind down from what you did that day.

  • Make sure to set aside time to talk to your boss, have an honest conversation with him about yourself, the things you've accomplished, and constantly ask for feedback.
  • Keep being proactive. There are a lot of things we end up missing doing because we forget it under all the things we have to manage.
  • Like tasks, mood is something we also have to manage. We tend to get "bored" while working because the work feels insignificant, but nothing is more motivating than making progress.
  • Do it the night before. It can help you so that you don't have to scramble, for instance, to find clothes or to look for a missing item.
  • When possible, do it well in advance. It will sort out unforeseen issues.
  • Do the pre-work. Read the materials, Review the data. Practice the activity so that you are ready.
  • Preparing saves you time. It reduces errors, prevents re-work, and shortens activities.
  • Reduce your stress. When you are ready, you feel confident. Your stress is reduced because you have less to worry about.
  • Make it a habit. Make it part of your lifestyle.
Preparation should follow planning

Planning as a first step is good. But preparation is even better.

Planning helps you to know what you will be doing on a day. Preparation gets you ready to actually do the tasks.

Time feels like it's passing differently

2020 made us aware that we experience the passage of time different from reality. The days felt stretched out, and some months seemed to go on forever.

Time has two faces: One is the "objective time" of watches and calendars. The second is "lived time", the time of your subjective experience. This time is felt, lived, and acted.

The pandemic has given us first-hand experience of the fundamental nature of time.

Looking into the past, we cannot remember exactly how many months ago the Australian bushfires were raging. Looking into the future, we wonder when we will be able to go on holiday? If we knew the world would be back to normal in three months, time would feel as if it is passing more quickly. Since we don't know, life drags on.

We mostly don't pay attention to lived time since we find objective time more useful. But we can get an understanding of the difference between them when they come apart.

An hour spent at the dentist's office feels long and drawn out while an hour at a party feels like it is passing by very quickly.

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