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Self Improvement

138 STASHED IDEAS

Prolific Minds Keep On Giving
  • Pablo Picasso was a great artist who created 50,000 works of art in his life. He devoted his life to art and every idea he had, had to be captured on canvas;
  • Thomas Edison, over the course of his lifetime, had acquired more than a thousand patents. He was not only an inventor but also was a manufacturer and a businessman;
  • Barbara Cortland was a profound writer who wrote 723 novels and until the moment she died, she had 160 unpublished novels that were waiting to be published;
  • Seth Godin published a post every day for over a decade and was a best selling author of 17 books.
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Self Improvement

Action: The Key of Consistency

Becoming prolific means to maintain having a flexible mindset that adapts and still your own personal style.

Highly creative people are not always perfect yet they never fail to take the necessary steps. They will just keep creating, keep building, or keep writing. Creativity can be found in many types and forms and the tools for creative expression today is widespread.

  • Start with being curious and keep feeding your focus for that curiosity;
  • Know your end goal before you start;
  • Do your best work first thing in the morning without any distractions;
  • Take action almost everyday and make time for what you do best;
  • Allow yourself to wander, take walks as it leads to creative thinking;
  • Think long-term and maintain career progression for an extended period of time without losing focus; and
  • Build a creative output system that works well for you.

The law of progression states that if you can persistently create and share your body of work and don't stop and break the cycle, you will become unstoppable.

Anyonce can apply and become better over time. If you stay prolific, your creative efforts will pay off. Prolific output demands deliberate practice for as long as possible.

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.

In April 1874, under the guidance of social activist Etty Wheeler, 10-year-old Mary Ellen Wilson told a New York court of her almost daily whipping by her stepmother. The request for intervention was repeatedly refused, and Wheeler turned to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) for help.

Its president Henry Bergh agreed that the child was not her guardians' property and established American Humane, an NGO fighting to protect harmed creatures, including children.

During the Middle Ages, families decided the fate of the children. The canon law of the Catholic Church stated that a bride had to be older than 12 and the groom, 14. But the father, desiring to increase his resources and prestige, looked for a daughter- or son-in-law immediately after a child's birth.

Interest in children as persons was revived in Europe when ancient philosophers' writings were discovered, and the fashion for educating children returned.

Towards the end of the 19th century, the custom of entrusting the care of offspring to strangers fell away. Parents were urged to provide their offspring with love and a sense of security.

But the pioneering work by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels proposed that home education ought to be replaced by social education. The aim was to prepare young people to fight the conservative generation of parents for a new world. In 1924, the League of Nations adopted a Declaration of the Rights of the Child, although it's still not implemented in many parts of the world.

German educator Friedrich Fröbel gave lectures on returning children to their childhoods and encouraged adults to provide children with care and free education.

In 1839, the Prussian government reacted by banning the employment of minors. France followed two years later. Britain only adopted the Factory Act in 1844. The legislation prohibited children under 13 from working in factories longer than six hours per day and required children to be educated in factory schools.

Children as objects

It took thousands of years for the European culture to realise that a child is not an object but a human being.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote in Emile, or On Education (1762), that "nature wants children to be children before they are men." He did not see children as humans but appealed to parents to look after their offspring. However, he did not take his own ideas to heart and abandoned his offspring at birth.

Christians condemned the practice of abandonment of newborns and ordered followers to care unconditionally for every child. This trend became so strong that it survived the fall of the Empire. Unwanted children ended up in shelters opened by monasteries.

Legal provisions outlawed parents from killing, mutilating and selling children. As children survived into adulthood, parents did not develop emotional ties with their offspring. During the Middle Ages, most European languages did not contain the word 'child'.

In the 18th century, it became the norm again to abandon unwanted children. They usually went to care facilities, but few survived into adulthood. Condemnation by the Catholic and Protestant churches did not help.

The Industrial Revolution turned out to be more effective. In Great Britain, the financing of shelters placed a burden on municipal budgets, but the new cotton mills in Lancashire, Derby, and Notts were seen as a godsend. Orphans became a source of cheap labour, working twelve hours a day. They had to earn a living to receive shelter and food.

  • In ancient Greece, babies were often left by the road or in the garbage. If a passer-by took the child, it was often raised for the slave market. This is because children were considered private property.
  • The Romans followed the custom to put a newborn on the ground just after birth. If the father picked the baby up, the mother could care for it. If not, the newborn was thrown away.
  • When Greeks and Romans did decide to raise their offspring, they showed them love and attention. Plato wrote that parents have the duty to care for their children's physical and mental development.

At first, corporeal punishment was the primary tool in the education process. In the 17th century, philosopher John Locke urged parents to use praise to stimulate children to learn and behave well.

The fashion then was for a wet nurse to feed a newborn, and then the child was passed on to grandparents or poor relatives for a salary. The child would return home around age five and be educated by the biological mother. Rousseau condemned all of this. After Emil, it became fashionable for the mother to breastfeed her child.

It takes time for our minds to process the situation properly. Practice patience because you do not need all of the answers right at this instant. Like with any creative process, the first answers aren't usually the best ones.

Keep in mind that the right answers will arrive in due time.

Concentrate on relaxing, recovering, and giving yourself constructively, healthy thoughts and experiences. Change your everyday habits to more relaxing pursuits and practice silence in order to clear your mind.

If your space of healing allows, make time for your friends and your loved ones.

Maya Angelou

"If you cannot make a change, change the way you have been thinking. You might find a new solution."

Stop whatever you're doing right now and notice the pattern that has been going on that's caused you despair and change it, regroup it, and remove yourself from the situation.

Don't let the fear of failure take over because you refuse to live in anguish any longer. Take the time away from everything that is stressing you out and for as long as you need until you're ready to face the challenges if you ever choose to do so.

In order to make positive changes and heavily impact your life, it is important to identify the thoughts and actions that put ourselves in the hole of despair in the first place in order to uproot it.

Life seems rough from time to time but we must not lose focus on what's important to us.

Gently daydream about the possibilities you have with your new ideas, but try to approach it in a more relaxed manner where it will naturally surface.

Look for something that sparks your interest and gather ideas from the internet, acquaintances, podcasts, or recommendations and dive in.

The advice that you've found or that was given to you was uplifting and hopeful. This has given you a more positive outlook in life but what are the steps you can take in order to put your new ideas into practice?

Good environments are a blend of talent, technology, tolerance, transparency and transcendence.

  1. A place that makes you shine and brings out the best in you.
  2. Encourages you to make smart, right choices every day, like saving money by riding a bicycle, or eating an apple instead of a pack of Lays.
  3. Promotes moving towards good decisions and accelerating your success.
  1. Join a social club, gym or a business club.
  2. Find a new spouse, who is a better fit for your life.
  3. Switch to a job where your talents are better appreciated and where you like doing what you do.
  4. Change your career altogether.
  5. Move to a different country.
  1. Get rid of the Television.
  2. Find a positive person or a mentor to help you reach your goals faster.
  3. Delete your Facebook, Instagram and Twitter Accounts.
  4. Stop spending time with people who drain your energy.
  5. Sell your car and get a bike.

Our environment, the people and all the external elements around us can be influenced with varying degrees. It is easy to replace the car we have, as compared to switching to a different company. Family culture, market trends and political/social/economical factors are the hardest to change or influence.

Learning about what is easy to change and what is not is important before we try to influence, replace, remove or tinker with any of the environmental factors.

We may not have control over most of the factors of our environment, but the more we understand ourselves, getting aware of our personal power and learning the required life lessons to humble us, the more capable we get at influencing our own environment.

Some factors will stay the same no matter what we do, and it is a good idea to change our mindset about them, and decide to see things differently. We can redesign our environment or redesign our thinking.

  • Change your smartphone or desktop wallpaper to something motivational.
  • Set alarms to follow your daily systems and good habits.
  • Declutter your home.
  • Install apps to manage your health better, like a meditation app.
  • Remove time-sucking apps and constant notifications from your phone.
  • Sell away things that annoy you.
  • Buy fresh fruit instead of chips.
  • Get a faster computer.

We can impact our environment by simply changing the way we behave and react.

  1. Stop fighting with family members.
  2. Stop resisting the market trends, and adjust our actions instead.
  3. Build a strategy to work with the system we are in, and the law of the land.
  4. Remember that the more successful we want to be, the more support we need from our environment.
The Variables Of Life

Where you are right now is a sum total of your starting point, your character and your environment.

Our character, personality traits, behavioural patterns, level of awareness, and decision-making skills form a set of variables that define the outcome of our life. Another set of variables is what we get in our environment, like our upbringing, and the people around us.

Friedrich Nietzsche

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And if you gaze long enough into an abyss, the abyss will gaze back into you."

Nietzsche observed that we start to become the person we focus on. We start to resemble our enemies and indulge in the very things that we hate in the other person, absorbing the thoughts and feelings of those associated with us.

Friedrich Nietzsche

""Sometimes people don’t want to hear the truth because they don’t want their illusions destroyed.""

Madness was a subjective and relative term according to the German philosopher.

He wrote about madness being found in prayer, love and a personal response towards life. A madhouse or asylum, according to him, was filled with people who were not really mad, but just like himself, different from what the society deems as normal.

Nihilism is the belief that all values are baseless, and there is nothing worthy to know or communicate. It is a philosophy of no belief, no trust, and having no purpose in life.

The No-belief ideology of Nietzsche provides a kind of cosmic scepticism, where everything is uncertain and even the concept of good and evil is subjective.

Established moral theories were routinely questioned by the philosopher and many consider the doctrine as an important counterpoint to many of the practices and moral values taken for granted.

The controversial philosopher questioned whether people really want to hear the truth or are happy in their beliefs, assumptions and illusions, not wanting them to be crushed by inconvenient facts.

Many people suffer from delusions and pretensions that have now taken up the place of reality and can turn hostile if faced with the bitter truth.

Nietzsche believed successful marriages are possible when there is a good amount of existing friendship.

According to him, a woman's love has a built-in hatred towards that which is not loved, and both love and hate come together as a package.

Nietzsche, a controversial German philosopher, fell out of favour due to his ideas about the ideal, superior man, described as the ‘overman’ who can and should foil the weaker man, were used by the Nazis.

His ideas pertaining to nihilism form his most popular doctrines and philosophies.

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