How to Switch Careers Even if You Think It's Impossible - Deepstash

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How to Switch Careers Even if You Think It's Impossible

https://money.com/switch-careers-advice-covid/

money.com

How to Switch Careers Even if You Think It's Impossible
'Confidence is king. Faking it is not.'

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Adopting a new profession

Adopting a new profession

Any time there's a crisis, it can spark self-evaluation. We can wonder where we are in our life and career. Are we doing things that feel fulfilling and challenge us?

Whether you've been unsatisfied in your career path or your job seems risky at the moment, this might be a time to map out a future that is satisfying and potentially financially rewarding.

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‘The two Rs’ of job seeking

  • Reflection. Take time to pinpoint what your values are in your career: What skills and strengths do you have? What do you still want to grow? And what feels like the right move?
  • Research. Align your vision with research. Google what companies and industries make sense. Learn whether you need to go back to school, and if so, what programs would be best suited.

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Translate what you already have

If finding a new job sounds overwhelming, think practically about how you can insert yourself into an area where you might seem like an outsider.

Knowing how your specific experience translates is key. Knowing the fine details of the job, what it requires, and the company will help you to find a way in. Showing examples of learned new skills proves you're really passionate about that role and will grow into it. Employers find that exciting.

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Take steps, not leaps

It is good to dip your feet in before the big switch. It doesn't hurt to do a side hustle while performing a full-time job. For example, if you're dreaming of becoming an interior designer, ask friends if they know someone looking for help redoing a room.

Networking is easier than ever. Email listservs and specialized Facebook groups can offer a relatively simple foot in the door for particular industries.

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Confidence and career switching

Instead of "fake it until you make it," it's better to believe in yourself and your capability. No employer expects you to have 100% of the qualifications.

Don't lie about your proficiency and then get in over your head. Expect to find the job more challenging at first. If you're not hearing back from employers or not nailing the interviews, reach out and ask for feedback. Ask people in that industry to read your resume.

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Common career advice is changing

Common career advice is changing

In the last few years, experts describe the current labor market as "candidate-driven," meaning that job seekers hold more power than employers. This means that you shouldn't ...

Telling your boss you’re looking for another position

  • It used to be that when you left a job, you were seen as a traitor. Now companies make efforts to ensure people leave on good terms. They have programs that keep the door open in case employees want to return.
  • Not only is there less risk in letting your manager know you're looking, but there may also be upsides. Your boss may want to figure out how to keep you.
  • If staying with the company isn't realistic, you may find ways to continue to work with the company. But the conversation may be uncomfortable and be far worse if you suspect your manager won't be understanding.

Staying at a job for at least a year or two

  • This conventional wisdom is not always realistic. You may need to relocate because of your spouse's job, for example.
  • Staying for only a short term no longer hurt a resume. 32% of employers expect job-jumping. Millennials are especially prone to brief stays at jobs. 70% quit their jobs within two years.
  • Gaps in job history are no longer seen as problematic either, but you have to show that your time off wasn't a waste of time.
  • However, you should avoid jumping around if you can because of the emotional drain of finding a new place, new friends, and reproving yourself.

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Remote Working

It’s almost hard to imagine now that people would commute 2 hours each way, from home to office and back, hopping buses and trains. Remote working, as discovered by millions recently, has plenty of...

Challenges In Remote Working

Remote working is not without its challenges, with many feeling isolated and unmotivated, being left on their own.

Communication is trickier with colleagues and bosses, and there is a general lack of transparency and chances of overworking.

Tools Of A Good Remote Worker

  • Being Tech Savvy: A Good PC/Laptop, the latest tools and software for the job, and a reliable internet connection are a must for most remote working profiles.
  • Good Communication Skills: Most of the communication will be written, and one should be able to articulate complex concepts and subtleties while being concise. This link provides a handy guide.

Make Job Seeking A Constant Thing

Make Job Seeking A Constant Thing

We should try and learn every new skill possible and continuously build our personal brand.

Most people start their search for a job after years when they feel they should ...

Your Skill Inventory

  • Your skill sets are of no value if no one knows about them, and sometimes we ourselves do not know the value of our unique skills.
  • Updating your resume regularly with a clear list of your old and new skills helps you understand and shape yourself for your next adventure.
  • It is also a good idea to create a brand for yourself in a specific sector, listing out the relevant skills that are concentrated and leave an impact.

What Makes a Good Resume

The last decade has changed the way a recruiter looks at a profile. You need to constantly update and restructure the content with the market realities and demands.

  • A good resume has brevity, action verbs, and skills that fit the job being applied for.
  • It helps to have a formal tone while providing hard, countable facts.
  • Making use of keywords and familiar buzzwords(corporate lingo) makes finding and selecting easier for the recruiter.