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7 Assumptions Smart People Never Make

Believing Therapy Is A Waste of Time

The fallout of not getting to the bottom of your stuff can affect not only your personal life but your professional life as well. 

Not only do successful people not fear therapy, but they also embrace it.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

7 Assumptions Smart People Never Make

7 Assumptions Smart People Never Make

https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/01/24/7-bad-habits-assumptions-that-successful-people/

forbes.com

7

Key Ideas

Believing That Being Wrong Is a Failure

The best way to know what works and what doesn’t, is to fail a few times.

Smart people don’t fear being wrong because they know that being wrong is ultimately an instrument that pushes them closer to being right. 

Thinking That Everything Is About You

Many of us obsess over “rejections” and ruminate on what we could have done differently. It’s more productive to realize that every disappointment or poor interaction is not actually about us. 

Successful people realize that every little thing – bad or good – is not a reflection of them or their self-worth.

Being E-Ready Every Minute of the Day

Smart people know that having a fulfilling life means having a life outside of work. And they make time for it. Obsessively checking work email at the dinner table is a good recipe for disaster. 

Set some time where your phone is off, and your attention is on the people right in front of you.

Believing Therapy Is A Waste of Time

The fallout of not getting to the bottom of your stuff can affect not only your personal life but your professional life as well. 

Not only do successful people not fear therapy, but they also embrace it.

Thinking It's OK to Skip the Gym

Smart, well-rounded people do physical activities during their downtime – swimming, skiing, rock-climbing, tangoing – and they build them into their schedules. 

That makes exercise something to look forward to, not to dread.

De-Stressing

If you don’t take time to de-stress your brain, something’s going to snap, mentally or physically. Successful people internalize that reality and build time for de-stressing into their lives. 

Mediate, run, walk, do yoga, swim, write, knit, dance, take a long drive. Whatever it is that allows your brain to relax and reboot, make sure you do it at least once a day.

Believing You're Smarter

Smart people never assume they are the smartest people in the room.  That sort of assumption is really just contempt in disguise, and it leads to undervaluing and underestimating the others.

Smart people assume that they can learn something from anyone, and they provide others with opportunities to ‘tell their stories.’

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Fear of old age (and death)

Benjamin Franklin once said, "Most people die at 25 and are buried at 75." This metaphorical death comes when people figure they can't make it happen, so they end up quitting in advance.

Fear of old age can also be harmful when a person has to go through a major career transition. In the end, age is far less important than your belief in yourself.

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Types of lies
Types of lies
  • White Lies. People tell white lies claiming to be tactful or polite.
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Turn Small Decisions Into Routines

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One way to avoid this is to eliminate smaller decisions by t...

Make Big Decisions In The Morning

Save small decisions for after work (when decision fatigue kicks in) and to tackle complex decisions in the morning, when your mind is fresh

A similar strategy is to do some of the smaller things the night before to get a head start on the next day.

Pay Attention To Your Emotions

...and you'll able to look at decisions as objectively and rationally as possible.

Strong decision-makers know that a bad mood can make them lash out or stray from their moral compass just as easily as a good mood can make them overconfident and impulsive.

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Stress and smart choices

When we are in a stressful situation, we are prone to make poor choices.

Even a little stress can influence our decisions and make us slip up.

Stress motivation

Don't let stress motivate your decisions. When you're feeling the most stress, you'll also feel the biggest urge to make a poor choice.

If you do make a decision while you are under stress, ensure to re-evaluate it when you are calm.

De-stress regularly

When you're under regular stress, you'll never get a chance to make good, rational choices.

If you set aside 30 minutes each day to relax, you will be in a better state to make smart choices.

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Design trumps willpower

Your behavior defaults to what is most convenient.

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10-minute night routine
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  • Set up literally everything that needs to be set up so that you don’t have to waste mental energy during your morning.
Being friends with your employees

... means they will do anything for your company.

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Do not rule someone out

... because of past issues.

Jordan Belfort took a chance on a handful of employees that were in dire situations. Despite past misconduct or lack of experience, he looked at personality and work ethic when making decisions.

As a result, he hired many of the "wrong types" of people. These people did great work for him, and felt indebted for the opportunity. It teaches to look beyond a resume or a few key signals when making hiring choices.

Building a company culture

Social gatherings are a great way to build company culture. Stratton Oakmont was extremely creative about the events that they had. These activities created a stronger bond between people at the company and offered a fun, social outlet.

Company get-togethers do not have to be as morally wrong as Stratton Oakmont's were to accomplish the same thing. Rather, it takes extra creativity and effort from a company.

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Emotional Intelligence( EQ/EI)

Is the measure of an individual’s abilities to recognise and manage their emotions, and the emotions of other people, both individually and in groups.

Benefits of a higher EQ
  • Ease in forming and maintaining interpersonal relationships and in ‘fitting in’ to group situations.
  • A better understanding one's own psychological state, which can include managing stress effectively and being less likely to suffer from depression.
IQ and EQ

There is no correlation between IQ and EQ scores.

IQ has no connection with how people understand and deal with their emotions and the emotions of others (EQ). 

You simply can’t predict emotional intelligence based on how smart someone is.

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Act as If You Are In Total Control
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Ignore What You Can’t Influence

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See The Past as Training

Learn from your mistakes, and those from others too, but let them go. The past is just training; it doesn't define you.

When something bad happens, see it as an opportunity to learn something you didn't know. When another person makes a mistake, learn from it and see it as an opportunity to be kind, forgiving, and understanding.

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Mental shortcuts

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Smart people and biases

We often assume that intelligence guards against bias. Its why those with higher S.A.T. scores think they are less likely to make universal thinking mistakes.

However, smarter people are more vulnerable to these thinking errors.

Biases and human intelligence
  • People who are aware of their own biases are not better able to overcome them. Our intuitive thinking is just as prone to overconfidence, extreme predictions, and the planning fallacy.
  • According to scientists, intelligent people have a larger bias blind spot. They can spot systematic flaws in others, but not in themselves. They will excuse their own minds but harshly judge the minds of other people. 

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Emotional intelligence when facing uncertainty
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Strategies to improve the quality of your decisions
  • Be wary of fear and spot it as soon as it begins to surface.
  • Stay positive. 
  • Know what you know—and what you don’t.
  • Embrace that which you can’t control. 
  • Focus only on what matters. 
  • Don’t seek perfection - it leaves you lamenting what you failed to accomplish instead of enjoying what you were able to achieve.
  • Don’t dwell on problems. Rather focus on actions to better yourself.
  • Recognize when you are overly influenced by your assumptions and emotions or by another person’s opinion.
  • Have a contingency plan without asking "What if?"