The Just-World Hypothesis - Deepstash

The Just-World Hypothesis

Is a cognitive bias that causes us to assume that people’s actions always lead to fair consequences, meaning that those who do good are eventually rewarded, while those who do evil are eventually punished. Shortly, is the belief that everyone gets what they deserve.

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